Livro [RE|THINKING Lighweight Structures

[RE|THINKING  Analysis & Materials -
Analysis & Materials WG round robin
exercises I & II

P.D. Gosling' *" B.N. Bridgens', N.J. Bartlc', A.G. Colman'
School of Civil Engineering & Geoscience.s. University ofNewcastle, Newcastle-
upon-Tyne, NEI 7RU. UK
Author for correspondence (p.d.gosliiig@ncI.ac.uk), Chairman of tiie Tr-NSINHT
Analysis & Materials Working Group,

Abstract

During 2011 the TENSINel Analysis & Materials Working Group launched a round-
robin (1) exercise to quantify the analysis and design of four simple conic and hypar
membrane structures. Around 20 organisations including consultants, contractors,
and university research groups took part in the exerci.se. This paper presents a
summary of the inain outcomes arising from an initial study of the submitted data. It
also provides details of further information being used to identify the underlying
causes of the signilkant variations contained in the solutions provided by the
participating organisations.

A second round-robin exercise is de.scribed in this paper that aims to provide a link
between material characterisation and structural analysis. The exercise looks at both
the testing of membrane materials and the analysis and interpretation of the data
arising from these tests as inputs into the structural analysis. Details of the approach
adopted in the round-robin (II) exercise, the form of the expected outcomes, and
timescales are presented.

Keywords: analysis and materials, structimil analysis, material characterisation,
roiind-rohin.

Introduction

In 2010 the TENSINet Analysis & Materials Working Group launched a round robin
exercise to explore the solutions obtained from the analysis of simple fabric

3

structures. At the launch of the round robin exercise it was made very clear that; // is
not !lie purpose or aim of the roimd robin exercise to demonstrate tluil one analysis
method is superior to another or to develop a competition iKtween design
consiihants [11. Instead, the generic purpose or aim of the roimd-rohin exercise is to
facilitate on understanding of the analysis methodologies used in the design of
membrane structures, ranging from theoretical considerations through to reporting.
It is well known that several different simulation approaches are used, each with
particular characteristics and capabilities [ 1 ].
hi this initial round robin exercise a small number of realistic, simple membrane
structures were proposed. Information was provided in sufficient detail for each
membrane structure to avoid particular t>'i5es of ambiguity in the resulting design.
Along with analysis outcomes such as stresses and displacements, participants were
also recjuested to state the required fabric strength to fulfil the design.
The following information was provided for each membrane structure task;
TS I.     Structure geometry- e.g. positions of support points, etc.,
'1"S 2.     Structure support definitions - e.g. masts, cables, belts, etc., as
applicable,
fS 3.     Boundary conditions - e.g. simple/tnoment supports, fixed/sliding
supports, rotational freedoms/constraints, etc.,
fS 4.     Membrane material tjiie & grade - e.g. PVC/polyester,           PTFE/glass,
Si/glass, P TFE/PTFE, etc.. types ll-V,
TS 5.     Supporting structure material types - e.g. steel, aluminium, timber,
wire ropes, etc.,
TS 6.     Fabric orientation/patterning - warp and fill directions.
TS 7.      Fabric prestress - warp and fill.
TS 8.     Wind load - in the form of surface pressures (kN.m""),
TS 9.     Snow load - projected plan area (kN.ni ").
The anal>'sis of the membrane structure assumed static loads. Other aspects of the
analysis methodology were not prescribed, fhey were to be chosen freely, and were
expected to he that which were normally used in practice by the participants.
The round robin exercise was proposed as a non-commercial activity. It was
intended to serve the purpose of advancing the scientific and engineering practice in
the analysis and design of membrane structures. Participation in the round robin
exercise was further based on the principles |1J that involvement in the round robin
exercise was voluntary, completion of the round robin tasks were undertaken
without fee and liability, the completed tasks would not be used outside the remit of
the round robin exercise and would not be made available in a format that could be
used for design purposes by a third parly, the membrane structure task results would
be made anonymous, and reporting of results from the round robin tasks would be
made using a standard forin (provided) via a dedicated Analysis and Materials
Working Group page on the TBNSlNet website.
As part of the information pack provided for the round robin exercise a form was
provided for reporting the results (Figure 1) that included information about
ma,ximum and minimum warp, fill, and shear stresses, displacement and reactions,
and there positions on the canopy. For each membrane task details of the analysis
methodology (e.g. name and version of the software, reference or website link

4

describing the basis of the software, etc.), assumptions made to obviate the need for
specific data not provided as part oT the task specification, and reasons for not
making use of any part oftlie information provided as part of die task specilication,
were also requested. A statement of the design criteria used to select the fabric (e.g.
DIN 4134; lASS WG 7 recommendations; French design Guide; MSAJ; ASCE 55-
10; in-housc design practice; ..,) concluded the reporting of the exercise,

The following four exercises were defined:

Exercise 1, Conic >vith asymmetric preslress (Figure 1)

Geometry:
14m X 14m square base with fixed edges
Circular head ring: 5m above base, 4m diameter, lixed
Preslress:
Radial (warp) - 4kN/m, circumferential (fill) = 2 kN/m
iVlaterial properties: PVC coated polyester,
Warp modulus = 600 kN/ni, Fill modulus = 600 kN/m, Poisson's ratio, v,,f- v,v =
0.4, Shear modulus = 30 kN/m
Applied loading;
Uniform wind upliit; 1.0 kN/in2 perpendicular to upper surface of fabric
Uniform snow: 0.6 kN/ni2 vertical downwards
Loadcases for analysis:
LC1: Prcstress; LC2: Prestress + Wind upliQ; LC3: Prestress + Snow
Note: seams are not required la be modelled in any of(he exercises.

5

Exercise 2. Conic witli equal prestiess (Kigure 1)

As Exercise 1, except:
Geometry:
Circular head ring: 4m above base, Sm diameter, fixed
Prestress:
Radial (warp) = circumferential (1111) = 4 klN/tii

Exercise 3. Simple hypar (Figure 3)

Geometry: 6m x 6m square hypar, high points 2m above low points. Warp direction
runs between high points. Rdges are supported by cables.
Prestress: warp = fill = 3 kN/m; cable prestress = 30kN.
Material pronerties: PVC coated polyester,
Warp modulus = 600 kN/m. Fill modulus = 600 kN/m. Poisson's ratio. v„r =  =
0.4, Shear modulus = 30 kN/m
Cable diameter = 12mm, axial stiffness eqiiiyalent to a solid steel rod, elastic
modulus = 205 GPa = 205 kN/mm2
Applied loading:
Uniform wind uplift: 1.0 kN/m2 perpendicular to upper surface of fabric
Uniform snow: 0.6 kN/m2 vertical downwards
Loadcases for analysis:
LCI: i'restress; LC2: Prestress + Wind uplift: LC3: Prestress + Snow
Note: seams are not required to he wodelied

Exercise 4. Twin hypar

Geometry: 12m x 6m twin h>par, 3 high points and 3 low points, 4m height
diflerence between high and low points. Warp direction as shown. Edges are cables
supported.

6

Prcstress:
Warp = fill = 5 kN/m; cables prestress = 50 kN
Material oronerlies: PTFE coaled glass fibre,
Warp modulus = 1400 kN/ni, Fill modulus = 800 kN/m, Poisson's ratio, xv = Vf„ =
0.8, Shear modulus = 100 kN/m
Cable diameter = 19mm, axial stiffness equivalent to a solid steel rod, clastic
modulus = 205 GPa = 205 kN/mm2
At)plied loading:
Uniform wind uplift: 1.0 kN/ni2 perpendicular to upper surface of fabric
Unform snow: 0.6 kN/m2 vertical downwards
Loadcases for analysis:
LCI: Prestress; LC2: Prestress + Wind uplift; LC3; Prestress + Snow
Note: seams are no! required to he inocielled

Outcomes of round robin I - outline samples

Twenty-two participants completed all or some of the exercises. The cross-section of
those involved was truly cross-disciplinary and international, with 20 diflerent
organisations {two organisations provided two ditTerent .solutions), representing
fourteen engineering design consultancies and six universities. They were located in
four countries in Europe, the Middle East, South-East Asia, and the United States
(see list of authors and affiliations for details). For such a specialist analysis
exercise, this response represented a significant proportion of the organisations that
would be capable of carrying out such exercises world-wide.
The analysis codcs used by the participants are listed in Table 1, The codes are listed
in alphabetical order, such that they cannot be related to the participant nutnbers
used in the presentation of the results, to avoid compromising anonymity.

During the planning piiasc and after the launch of the round robin exercise there was
some skepticism that the effort was worthwhile. Comments and questions including.
"Win' are vou doing this? - the exercises are so well defined lluil il is inevitable thai
even'one will get the same results " were received, flie sample results illustrated in
Figures 5-7 [2] clearly justify the need for an exercise of this t>pe, and the need for
future work to understand the principles behind the analysis methods. Further
validation and benchmarking for membrane analysis software is also clearly
required. Consistency is essential to provide conlldcncc in the analysis and design
process, to enable third party checking to be carried out in a meaningful and efllcient
manner, and to ensure the development of the pAirocode that will facilitates the safe
and efficient design of membrane structures.

Round Robin II - analysis and materials

The second round robin will contain two studies; one related to analysis, and the
second focusing on material testing and interpretation.
'fhe first study is to be a continuation of the analysis-based work started in Round
Robin I. No additional analyses will be requested in Round Robin II. Instead the
existing data (from Round Robin I) will be used more completely. Not all the data
has cuiTcntly been used in the synthesis of results published in [2]. To provide some
additional context to this data and to assist in its interpretation a request to the
original Round Robin I participants will be made during the first half of 2013 for
further information including, for example;
■     Mesh details (e.g. simple image - screen capture)

10

■     Element details (e.g. from matiuais, handbooks, notes, etc.)
■     Solver details (e.g. From manuals, handbooks, notes, ctc.)
■     Material local a.xes (e.g. simple image - screen capture)
■     Limit(s) on residuals
■     Detailed equilibrated geometry (x,y,z) - form-found, analysis, {e.g. data tile)

This list clearly concentrates on the finite-element-type characteristics of the
analysis which all the codes in Table I feature. Within the field of computational
mechanics these tyjies of details can have significant impacts on the validity and
accuracy of a solution. This has been further demonstrated in the application of
finite element principles to the analysis of membrane structures [3].
In Round Robin I the material properties for the membrane were specified. The
specification of tests and the analysis of test data open to interpretation in defining
biaxial stilTiiesses. and is often not specifically considered for shear. Whilst a
European Standard is currently being dralled for the biaxial testing of coated fabrics
it is not always possible to overcome difficulties arising from customary practice;
for e.xample, the assumption of plane stress in calculating materia! stiffnesses (Table
2).

 

The measurement of the shear properties of a membrane material is much less
frequently undertaken. It is normal to assume the stiffness in shear to be ,�-5% of the
biaxial values. However, it is well known that the shear characteristics of a fabric
play an important role particularly during installation of a canopy.

In Round Robin II manufacturers will be asked to provide samples of PVC-
polyester, PTFE-glass, and Si-glass fa foil may also be included depending on availability and interest]. Two routes to testing and interpretation will be pursued -
(i) Test houses - test fabric to their own protocols (biaxial and /or shear) and
interpret results using their methods. Report clastic constants; (ii) Consultants /
analysts /fabricators - Data to be provided from typical tests (biaxial and shear).
Test data sent to participants (graphs & tables of stress-strain values), who report
elastic constants if assuming a plane stress formulation and/or an alternative method
of use of the material data in analysis.

 

Concluding remarks

The outcomes, progress and developments of analysis and testing round robin
exercises have been presented. Interested existing and potential participants are
encouraged to contact the organisers via tensinet.iiinwg�lncl.ac.uk.

References

1       GOSLING, P.D., BRIDGKNS, \i.\�.,Speciftcciti(m ufa round robin
ererciseforlhe design ofmembrane structures. BOGNER-BALZ. H.,
IVIOLLAERT, M. (eds.). Tensile Architecture: Connecting Pas! and
Future, Proceedings of the 2010 TensiNet hiternationa! Symposium,
TensiNet, UACfiG, Sofia, 2010, pp.59-67.
2       GOSLING, P.D., BRIDGENS, B,N., et al. Analysis and design of
inemt>rcine structures: Results ofa round robin exercise. Engineering
Structures, 48, 2013, 313-328.'
3      GOSLING, P.D., ZH.ANG, L., A High-Fidelity Cable-Analogy
Coniiiuumi Triangular Elementfor the Large Strain. Large
Deformation, Analysis ofMembrane Structures. Computer Modeling in
Engineering <& Sciences, 71 (3), 201 1, 203-251.

 

12

 


Computational Cutting Pattern Generation
for Membrane Structures

Falko Dieriiiger''Armin Widhammer', Roland Wuchner", Kai-Uwe
Bletzinger'
' Chair ofStructural Analysis, Technische Universitiit Miinchen

Abstract

This Paper presents a computational method Ibr Cutting Pattern Generation of
textile membrane structures by using ideas from inverse engineering. This method is
based on an optimization approach, which is embedded in a lull continuum
mechanical description. The three dimensional surface, which is defined through the
form finding process, represents the final structure after manufacturing. For this
surface the coordinates in the three dimensional space £230 and the finally desired
prestress state (iprcsta-ss are known. The aim is to find a surface in a two dimensional
space Hiu which minimizes the difference between the elastic stresses Od.2D�3D
arising through the manufacturing process and the final prestress Oprgstrcss- Thus the
cutting pattern generation leads to an optimization problem, where the positions of
the nodes in the two dimensional space Q2D are the design variables. In addition this
paper presents various improvements to the depicted method. First of all. the
influence of the seam lines to the stress distribution in the membrane is investigated.
Additionally, the control of equal edge length for associated patterns is an example
for important enhancements.

Keywords: Membranes, Cutting Fallern Generation, Computational Methods,
Tensile Structures.



13

            Introduction

Membrane Structures are lightweight structures, which combine optimal stress stale
of the material with an impressive language of shapes [I], The shape ot membrane
structures is defined by the equilibrium of surface stresses and cable edge forces in
tension. The process to find the shape in equilibrium is known as form finding. In
the past a various number of methods have been developed to solve the inverse
problem of form finding [2] -[II]. Recent research in the field of Fluid-Structure-
Interaction accomplishes the design process with the strong possibility of simulating
the coupled problem of wind and membrane structure [I2J. Throughout the whole
design process of membrane structures the variation of prestress constitutes the main
shaping parameter. Details of cutting pattern and compensation are atTected by
residual  stresses from  developing curved surfaces  into   the   plane and  trom
anisotropic material properties. With the knowledge of this, numerical methods for
the design and analysis of membrane structures should be able to deal with all
sources of stress states in a proper way. In the following sections, a method for a
proper cutting pattern generation of membrane structures, which is able to treat the
prestress and residual states of stress in a correct continuum mechanical way. It is
well known that a general doubly curved surface cannot be developed into a plane
without compromises which result in additional residual stresses when the structure
is assembled. Figure 1 shows an example for this non-developability. If one tries to
cover a sphere with a fiat piece of te.xlile, the resulting surface will  show
compromises in the sense of wrinkles.

In case of membranes structures the clastic deformation due to prestress has to be
compensated as well. Typically, a two stage procedure is applied consisting of (i)
forced  flattening  of the curved  surface  into   a    plane  by   pure   geometrical
considerations and (ii) compensation of both, the intended pre-stress and the

14

 

additional elastic stresses of the flattening procedure [13]. Usually, an additional
problem occurs if the llattening strains are determined using the curved, final
surface as undeformed reference geometry, thus neglecting the correct assembling
procedure.

2           Cutting Pattern Generation

In this chapter an alternative approach is suggested which uses ideas from the
inverse engineering [14] - [17], The idea is to correctly simulate the assembling
procedure from a plane culling pattern as undeformed reference geometry to the
final deformed surface as defined by the design             stresses.          Consequently, the
definition of strains is non-conventional, i.e. inverse, as the coordinates of the
undeformed cutting pattern are introduced as unknowns. The proper cutting pattern
layout is found by an optimization technique by minimizing the deviation of the
stresses due to prestress and elastic deformation from the defined stress distribution
of form finding. The advantages of this procedure are that (i) the true assembling
process is modelled, (ii) automatically, all sources of stress deviation are correctly
resolved, e.g.    residual  stresses from   development,  (iii)    all    mechanical  and
geometrical reasons of compensation are considered, and (iv) again, the procedure is
consistently embedded          into                                     non-linear continuum     mechanics allowing    for           a
formulation as close as possible to reality.  Figure 2 roughly visualizes the
optimization procedure. The challenge in this way of doing cutting pattern
generation is to handle the numerical solution strategies for the optimization
problem. In [15] two difiercnt methods of solving the optimization problem are
reviewed.  Both of them are well  known methods for solving unconstrained
optimization problems. In the following, thus two methods are briefly discussed.

 

(I)
!i)j,
A necessary condition for a niiiiiinum in the least squares is a stationary point in the
functional H w.r.t. a variation in the reference geometry, 'I'his results in (he
following variational form of the optimization problem:

Av' =  J (cT.,,                         ):                                 = 0                                                       (2)

l o solve the nonlinear field equation (2) standard procedures like the finite element
method in combination with the Newton-Raphson method are applied. It turned out
in [15] that equation (2) shows a very small convergence radius due to the non-
convex character of the optimization problem. This disadvantage eould be avoided
by method II.
Method II: Minimization of the "stress difference" energy
The idea of method II is to solve the optimization of the stress difference in a "mean
way'. To do so a Galerkin approach is used. In this case the stress dilTerence is
integrated over the domain and a weighting function is applied to the stress
difference. Again, a variation of the equation should lead to the optiinum cutting
pattern (see eq. (3)).
Av"                                                     =0                                                                           (3)

To avoid the non-convexity of the optimization the weighting function is chosen as
the Euier-Almansi strains since they are energetically conjugated to Cauchy stresses
(see eq. (4)).

' J= 0                                                                                                                      (4)
n,
With both methods the resulting cutting patterns are only slightly different. A
detailed eomparisoti and more details about the ntimerical issues of both methods
can be found in [14J, [15],
Using this method to compute cutting patterns for membranes structures, a genera!
procedure can be described like the Ibllovving. (i) Compute the cutting lines in the
membrane surface. For this task geodesic lines are used in most cases, (ii) Divide the
membrane structure into pails, (iii) Compute the individual patterns with the
described optimization tnethodology. (iv) Compute the resultant stresses after the
assembling of the membrane. In Figure 3 an example for the procedure is given.


16

 

3          Consideration of scam stiffness in the computation

Alter the computation of the cutting patterns, an important step is the quantification
of the residual stresses in the membrane. These are occurring due to the fact that a
non-developable surface cannot be developed into a Hat surface without any
compromises. This results in residual stresses after the simulation of the erection
process, from a continuum mechanical point oi' view this means that the cutting
patterns are the reference configuration and the configuration from form finding is
an intermediate stage which is not totally in equilibrium. Performing a geometrical
nonlinear analysis to this configuration will result in a slight displacement which
ends up in the residual stresses. Starting with this in mind, the exact description of
the erection process is crucial, 'fhere are several inlluences to (he compulation. One
of them is the correct description of the geometry, respectively the structural
members of the structure. From this point of view it is totally clear that the
modelling of the seams is an important step to the "correct" structural model. The
intluence of the seams is related to the fact that the membrane is doubled in these
regions since overlapping material is needed for joining the adjacent strips. In order
to take this issue into account during the computation, cable elements are included
which consider the stiflhess from this doubled material. The problem which arises is
to quantify the inlluencc of tiiis doubled material in the membrane? There is no
unique answer ihis problem. Topical examples for a noticeable eiTect ot the
concentration of material are highpoints of membranes where a concentration of
seam lines is located, figure 4shows the well known Chinese hat membrane were
the seam lines are concentrated towards the upper ring. The diagram in figure 4
shows the change in stresses a in the membrane and the change in the forces F in the
cable elements by increasing ihe cross section area A of the seam line cable
elements. It can be seen that the membrane .stresses are decreasing while the forces
in the cable elements increase for larger seam line cross section areas. What is very

17

interesting in tiiis example is the amount of stress decrease in the membrane. For a
ratio of one for A to Amax the membrane stresses decrease to 65% of the initial
stresses. This effect is not equal for each kind of membrane and each situation but
this example shows that the effect should be investigated and included in each
computation of a membrane structure.

 

4          Control the same length of adjaccnt edges in cutting pattern
generation
When building a membrane structure the process of assembly can be structured as
(i) taking the patterns of the membrane and joining them together, (ii) assemble the
primary structure (e.g. steel frames) and (iii) mounting the membrane into it. In the
lirst step of joining the patterns it is obvious that the adjacent edges of the pattern
need to lit together or at least must have the same length. When neglecting this
constraint the resulting membrane will show wrinkles along the seam line due to the
fact thai the initial strains arc included into the membrane by Joining edges of
unequallenght together. From the numerical point of view the requirement of same
edge length of adjacent edges shows up in an equality constraint in the optimization
problem. In Figure 5 the requirement of same edge length of adjacent edges is
shown for the example of a four point lent consisting of six patterns with live seam
lines.

 

 

18

 

From a mathematical point of view the description of the equality constraint is rather
simple. The difTercnces of the lengths should be 0 for all seams. This allows the
formulation of an equality constraint for each seam which is shown in equation (5).
h,{x)=&L.=0                                                                                                                  (5)
All dilTercnces of the lengths are summed up to get a single equation of the equality
constraint. To avoid cancellations from positive and negative length dilTerences the
square of the values is choscn. With this equality constraint the optimization
problem by using the Least-Squares approach is slated in equation (6).

min —> / (x) = —/ J                  ~ �,,s) ■                  ~ �p.t
such that: h-(A") = AL, = 0
Knowing from section   2 that the objective function has a relatively small
convergence radius the starting point is a crucial issue to the optimization problem.
Additionally we know            from                      2                               that method               11 (Minimization                                             of the "stress
difference" energy) is a suitable related problem and provides a very good starting
point tor the optimization problem. In that sense a staggered approach is used to
solve the optimization problem: First solve the unconstrained problem with method
11. Use the resulting cutting pattern as the starting geometry for the constrained
optimization problem which can be tackled by various optimization algorithms. The
chosen solution strategy herein is the Lagrange method. The Lagrangian function for
the unconstraint problem is given in equation (7).
4x,//J=./(x)+/y/,(x)                                                                                                     (7)
The coiTCsponding Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions are given in equation (8).

 

19

 

5          Conclusions

Computational methods Tor the optimized eutting paUern generation have been
presented. The governing equal ions for cutting pattern generation have been cierivecl
by using the idea of inverse engineering from a fully continuum mechanical
approach. Improvements regarding structural requirements have been included into
the optimization process. Problems concerning seam line stiffness and controlling
length of adjacent patterns are tackled directly during the optimization process of the
cutting pattern,

References

fl]    Olto F, Rasch B. Finding Form. Detitscher Werkbund Bayern, Edition
A, Menges, 1995.

[21   Barnes M. Formfinding and              oftension siruclures by cfynamic
reletxcilion. International Journal ofSpace Structures 1999; 14:89-104.

f.>1     Wakcfick] DS. Engiin'eriiig cincilysis offen.sion slriicUtre.s: rheory and
practice. Engineering Structures 1999; 21{8):680-690,

[4]    Schek H-J. Theforce density methodforformfinding and computationii
ofgeneral networks. Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and
Engineering 1974; 3:115 134.

[5]    Linkwitz K. Formfmding by the Dirt'ct Approach andpertinent
.strategiesfor the conceptual design ofprestressed and hanging
stntctitres. International Journal of Space Structures 1999; 14:73-88.

[6]    filetzingcr K-U, Ramm E. A generalfinite element approach to the form
finding of tensile structures by the updated reference .strategy.
International Journal of Space Structures 1999; 14:131-146.

[7]    liletzingcr K-U, Ramm E. Structural optimization andformfinding of
light weight structures. Computers and Structures 2001; 79:2053-2062.

[8]    Bletzinger K~U, Wiiehncr R, Datjud F, Camprubi N. Computational
methodsforformfinding and optimization ofshells and membranes.
Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering 2005;
194:3438-3452.

 

 

20

[9]     Bletzinger K,-U, Linharci J, Wiichner R. Extended and integrated
numericalformfinding and pat/erning ofmembrane structures. Journal
ofllie inteniational association lor sliei! and spatial structures 2009;
50:35-49.

[ 1OJ Linliard J, Bletzinger K-U. "Tracing" the Ec/nilibrium - Recent Advances
in Numerical Form Finding; International Journal of Space Structures
2010; 25; 107-116.

f 11J Gallinger T. Effhiente Algorithmen zur partitionierten Losung slarl<
gekoppelter Probleme der Fluid-Struktiir-Wecbselwirkung. PhD Thesis,
Technische Universitat Miinchen, 2010.

[12] Doniinguez S. Numerische Simulation versteifter Membrane.
Mastcrlhesis, Technische Universitat Miinchen, 2010

f 13] Moncrieff li. Topping BMV. Computer methodsfor the generation of
membrane cutting patterns. Computers and Structures 1990; 37:441-
450.

[14] Linhard J, Wiichner R, Bletzinger K-U. Introducing cutting patterns in
fifrm finding and structural analysis, in (E. Oiiateand B. K.roplin, eds.)
Textile Composites and Inflatable Structures II, Springer, 2008.

[15] Linhard J. Numerisch-mechanische lietrachtung des Entwutfsprozesses
von Membrcmtragwerken, PhD Thesis, Technische Universitat
Miinchen, 2009.

[16] F. Dicringer, K.-U. Bletzinger, R. Wiichner: Practical advances in
numericalform finding and cutting pattern generation for membrane
structures. Journal of the international association for shell and spatial
structures 2012; 53:147-156

[17] Widhammer, A., Wiichner, R„ Bletzinger K.-U., Drape Simulationfor
.\'on-Deve!opahle Multi-Layered CFRP Structures Focusing on
Optimized Cutting Patterns, BCCOMAS 2012

 

21

 

The Role of Poisson's Ratio for the
Determination of Elastic Constants for
Fabrics

Jorg UhlemaniV, Reinhold Koenen', Natalie Stranghoner'
' Institutefor Mela! and Ligbtweight Structures, Utiiversity ofDuisburg-Esseu.

Abstract

Up to date the linear-elastic orthogonal anisotropic constitutive law is commonly
used to cover the actual nonlinear orthogonal anisotropic material behaviour of
coated fabrics in the stioictural analysis of membrane structures. The material
properties are incorporated by the elastic constants, namely the tensile stitTness in
the fabrics' warp and fill direction and the Poisson's ratio, respectively. This
contribution tbcusscs on the Poisson's ratio and demonstrates its importance to the
stress- and deformation-results of a structural analysis. Various recommendations
for the determination of the elastic constants have been published in the last decades.
Some of them generate rather high values for the Poisson's ratio. This contribution
aims to investigate for which deterniination options systematically high values arc
obtained and gives practical advise regarding a limitation. The sensitivity of the
constitutive law with high values for the Poisson's ratio will be confronted with the
approximative character of the elastic constants.

Keywords: Fabrics, material hehavioiw, linear-elaslic consti/iitive law, Poisson's
ratio

1          Introduction

In the orthogonal anisotropic linear-elastic constitutive law the strains are linearly
linked to the loads by the compliance matrix [D]"'. This can be written like in
Formula I. Alternatively this relation could be converted to Formula 2, where the
loads are linearly linked to the strains by the stiffiiess matrix [D]. Herein e arc the
strains [-] and n are the loads [kN/m], which are often called stresses in membrane
structure analysis. The four elastic constants are; E.�t as the tensile stiffiiess in warp

23

 

direction [kN/in] and liiyt in fill dircclion, respectively. Generally, the axes >: and y
refer to the vvarp and the fill yarn direction of the fabric. The transverse strains are
taken into account by the I'oisson's ratio v. v\y is the Poisson's ratio in x-direction
caused by a load in y-direction, Vyx applies analogue in perpendicular direction. The
compliance matrix fD] ' as well as the stiffness matrix [DJ arc presumed to be
symmetric, which is displayed in Formula 3. This implies that only three of the four
elastic constants arc independent of each other.

 

Ollcntimes the engineers' sight is set only on the elastic moduli E - or the tensile
stillness (it if multiplied with the fabric thickness t, respectively - when elastic
constants are discussed or when the effects of elastic constants on the stresses and
dellections of a membrane structure are analysed. Furthermore, troni time to time
the Poisson's ratio is set to zero in structural analysis and the tensile material
behaviour is modeled only by the two tensile stillnesses in the yarn axes. The aim of
this paper is to highlight the role of the Poisson's ratio within the anisotropic linear
elastic constitutive law. It will be analysed, in which design situations Poisson's
ratio may be neglected and where it is more accurate to model the actual material
behaviour considering the transverse strains.
The analysis and descriptions in the following sections are based on the testing
procedure of the Japanese standard MSAJ/M-02-1995 [1]. Herein biaxial tensile
tests at cross shaped test specimens are standardized. The aim is to produce
standardized load-strain-curves in order to determine elastic constants from these.
The standard defines the geometry of the cross shaped test specimen with arms
parallel to the yarn directions of the fabric, 'fhe yarns in the arms are loaded with

24

 

subsequcnlly varying tensile loads, so that within the measurement Held in the
center square of the cross different load ratios warp;fiil are produced. The Japanese
standard is mainly characterized by applying five load ratios warp:fill to the test
specimen: 1:1, 2:1, 1:2, 1:0 and 0:1. The measured load-strain-curves in warp and
till direction obtained From a biaxial tensile test depend on the load ratio applied
during a loading sequence.
From the obtained load-strain-curves only the parts above a fixed load are used to
detomiine elastic constants. This lower limit of the interpreted parts of the curves is
set to I kN/m for sjTithetic fiber fabrics such as polyester fabrics and 2 kN/m for
glass fiber fabrics. According to MSAJ/M-02-1995 the upper limit of the interpreted
curves is approximately '/j of the tensile strength obtained from uniaxial tensile tests.
Thus, elastic constants that produce load-strain-lines connecting the lower limit
point of the associated load-strain-curves with the upper limit point - or at least
approach this upper limit point as good as possible - are seen as the optimal ones.
Generally, the elastic constants can be derived from a curve fitting procedure using
the least squares method. This procedure aims to correlate straight load-strain-lines
to the non-linear load-strain-curves as good as possible. The straight load-strain-
lines result from inserting clastic constants and load ratios into Fonnida 1.

2          The requirement for the use of Poisson's ratio under specific
design situations

In general, the prestress of a membrane structure contributes to the load bearing
behavior. In anticlastic structures, where an external load leads to decreasing
membrane stress in one yarn direction and increasing stress in perpendicular
direction, it is important to model the transverse strain in the membrane accurately.
This enables to judge at what load magnitude the prestress decreases to zero at one
location and in which area the prestress is neutralized for the full load magnitude. At
the time when the prestress is locally neutralized, the load bearing behavior changes,
see e.g. [2],
■fhe Poisson's ratio is needed to model the stress-strain-relationships in those load
ratios where negative strains can occur under tensile loads. This can be realized from
Figure 7, which shows exemplary load-strain-curves of a Glass-PTFE-fabric under
the load ratios 1:0 and 0:1 and the determination of clastic constants exiusively for
these uniaxial loadings. In the uniaxial load ratios 1:0 and 0:1 large negative
transverse strains appear in the unloaded yarn direction. Typically for fabrics
transverse strains of smaller magnitude also occur in warp direction for the load
ratio 1:2.
Furthermore, the Poisson's ratio is generally needed when elastic constants are
aimed to be derived from more than one load ratio, simply because the number of
required   elastic   constants  equals   the   number   of    load-strain-curves to    be
systematically approached optimally. As the load ratio 1:1 usually occurs only in the
corners or at the edge of a membrane with small percentage of area, the load ratios
1:0 and 2:1 would be convenient as the determination basis - 0:1 and 1:2 for
opposite loading, respectively. In this case the use of a set of constants considering
Poisson's ratio seems to be appropriate. In fact four independent clastic constants
are necessary to fit four load-strain-curves properly. This also means that in the linear-elastic constitutive law with a symmetric stilthess matrix, where only three of
the four elastic constants are independent of each other, only three measured load-
strain-curves can be fitted exactly.

For quadratic pneumatically prestressed membranes as well as  for quadratic
mechanically prestressed membranes a load ratio of approximately 1:1 is dominant.
In this case, where only one load ratio has to be analysed to determine elastic
constants and where the strains are always positive, the measured load-strain-
relation can be described using only two tensile stiffnesses Ext and Eyt and setting
the Poisson's ratio equal to zero at the same time. As the obtained tensile stiffnesses
are not the same as when obtained from an uniaxial tensile test - which would give
the correct definition of the modulus of elasticity - the values have to be seen as
fictitious values. Nonetheless, the application is a reasonable approach.
A proper determination of the elastic constants is generally recommended as they
may have an important eiTect on the stresses and deflections of membrane strucaires

26

[3]. Parametric studies performed at the Institute for Metal and Lightweight
Structures of the University of Duisbiirg-Essen showed that the membrane stress can
easily increase by values up to approximately 30% for plane structures and
anticlastic structures with small curvature while the tensile stilTness increases within
a frame of realistic values. Even if the influence of the constants' values on the
stress state of a structure decreases with an increase of the curvature - and it actually
may decrease to an influence close to 0% - it is recommended to determine the
elastic constants properly. First of all, the quantitative influence and thus the proof
of the negligible influence on a specific stress item can only be obtained from
parametric studies for a particular structure. No general limit for the curvature can
be given, where the influence changes        from "important" to "unimportant".
Furthermore, even if the infltience of the tensile stilTness decreases, the influence of
high values of the Poisson's ratio may be significant. Secondly, the influence of the
elastic constants on the deflections decreases very much less. Decreasing tensile
stiffness values within a realistic frame can easily increase the deflection by 40% for
structures with small curvature. For structures with high curvature the influence of
decreasing tensile stilTnesses is actually lower, but the deflection may increase by
approximately 25%, though.

3           Limit values for Poisson's ratio

An upper limit value of v < 0.5 is given for isotropic solid materials. As fabrics are
anisotropic materials, this limitation is not applicable for them. The limitation can be
derived from an examination of the volume expansion of a three-dimensional
isotropic volume, see Fomnila 4 [4].

— = --(l-2v)-(o, +ay+a,)

Formula 4.                Volume expansion ofan isotropic solid under
axial stress in the three directions x, .v and z

The examination of the material model shows that for v > 0.5 the volume would
decrease under tensile stresses in all three dimensions. Actually, no known material
shows this behavior and therefore the material model is not plausible for values of
V > 0.5. For a value of v = 0.5 the volume does not change under external loads,
which means that the material is incompressible. Some types of rubber show
approximately this behavior. For anisotropic materials, a general limitation like the
one for isotropic materials can not be given. Furthermore, for plane materials like
coated fabrics an examination of the volume is not appropriate. But limitations for
certain situations can be derived from other examinations.
First of all, finite element software expects a positive definite stiffness matrix [D].
This means that the determinant det [D] has to be positive as well as the determinant
of all submatrices, e.g. [5]. For a plane stress state like quoted in Formula 2, the
only submatrix in the stillness matrix is the entry at the top left, which is the tensile
stiffness in warp direction E�t. The latter requirement directly leads to E�t > 0. The
calculation of det [D] brings Formula 5. hiserting of Formula 3 into Formula 5 leads to Formula 6, where a limitation of the Poisson's ratio    is given as a
flinction of the tensile stiffiiess ratio.

As the tensile stiffness in warp direction E�t has to be positive. Formula 6 implies
that the tensile stiffiiess in fill direction Eyt has to be positive, too. These limits are
due to the requirements of a finite element analysis for a plane continuum and are
independent of the material to be analysed.
Fabrics are characterized by quite large transverse strains, especially Glass-PTFE-
fabrics with their highly crimped yarns. This has been shown with means of the
uniaxial load ratios 1:0 and 0:1 in Figure J. The figure shows, that the transverse
strains are even greater than the strains in the loaded direction.
Derived from the typical material behaviour of fabrics, limits for the Poisson's ratio
can be examined to ensure plausibility of the material model for specific load ratios,
i.e. to ensure at least the correct algebraic sign of the strains. Figure 2 gives
exemplary load-strain-curvcs for the load ratios 1:1 and 2:1. From experience it is
known that for these load ratios the determined set of elastic constants ollentimes
leads to wrong algebraic signs, namely for the warp strains at 1:1 and the fill strains
at 2:1. It can be seen from Figure 2, that the strains in warp and fill direction are all
posifive under these load ratios for this exemplary test results. To generally ensure
positive warp strains under the load rafio 1:1 it has to be < Ej.t/Ext, and to ensure
positive fill strains under the load ratio 2:1 it has to be Vxy< 0.5, see Figure 3 for the
derivafion. Within the frame of this contribution, this analysis distinguishes only
between positive and negative strains and does not consider any exact values.
From the different values for the Poisson's ratios examined in Figures I and 3, it
can be clearly seen, that if the Poisson's ratio is limited in order to ensure
plausibility in the load ratios 1:1 and 2:1, the large transverse strains in the load
ratios 1:0 and 0:1 can not be modeled in the required magnitude at the same time.

The same realization can be described from another point of view: The inclusion of t

he zero-load-curves into the determination procedure for elastic constants in order
to improve the curve fitting for these two curves generally leads to higher values of
Poisson's ratio and lower values of the tensile stiffnesses. This is because it is the
only way to model high negative strains within the linear-elastic constitutive law.



4          Large effects of high values for Poisson's ratio versus the
approximative character of fictitious elastic constants

The Ibllowing example of a barrel vault examines the effect of the Poisson's ratio to
the membrane stress at the edge of the membrane. The structure shown in Figure 4
is quadratic in the horizontal projection with a side length of 10 m and an arch
height of 3 m. The edges are fixed. The prestrcss is chosen to be isotrop with
p = 3.0 kN/m in each yarn direction. The structural analysis is conducted using the
finite element software package SOFiSTiK 2012 [6] applying a third order analysis.
The structure is vertical loaded downwards with q = 0.60 kN/m�.

29

On ihc basis of load-strain-ciirves of a Glass/I'TKE-labric wil!i a tensile slrength
warp/fiil of 140/i 20 kN/m three different sets of elastie constants are examined,
calculated by three different determination options. All        constant values are
calculated with the MATLAB correlation analysis routine established at tiie Institute
for Metal and Lightweight Structures of the University of Duisburg-Essen [7], using
the "least squares method minimizing the strains" [1 j. The first determination option
is the original MSAJ procedure. The commentary of MSAJ/M-02-1995 recommends
to include all live load ratios into the determination procedure, but evaluating only
eight out of the ten available load-strain-curves, disregarding the zero-load-curves;
Fill at 1:0 and warp at 0:1. The resulting set of elastic constants is given in Tnhk' I.
The second determination includes the zero-load-curves like it is proposed by
Bridgens and Gosling [8J. As described in the section above, this inevitably results
in lower tensile stitTnesses and higher Poisson's ratios, see Table 1. In the third
determination option the evaluated load ratios are limited to those which are close to
the real load ratios in the analysed structure under the analysed loading condition
f7J. As the load ratio varies over the membrane from approximately 4; I in the center
to approximately 1:1 at the edges, the MSAJ-test load ratios 1:0 and 2:1 are chosen
as the basis for the elastic constants' determination. To examine the effect of the Pois.son's ratio on the warp stress the results are given
in a warp stress (n„)-Pois.son's ratio (V\y)-diagrani, see left side oCFigure 4. It can be
seen that the effect increases strongly for high values of Vvy. This is where the
Poisson's ratio approaches the limit of V\y\'y> < I as given in Fonmtkt J. In this
region the effect easily exceeds the effect oi'the tensile stiffnesses.
If the warp stress n„ in the nw-v�j-diagram is normalized to niin n�j for each
determination option and the normalized value n�t/min n,v is plotted against the
product of the Poisson's ratios v�yVyx� it can be .seen that the influence of the pair of
Poisson's ratios is approximately linear for values up to about VxyVyx-0,6. The
maximum effect on the stress can be quantified to about 20% in that range. For alues greater than v�vVjx = 0.6 the effect becomes strongly over-linear: Tiny
changes of the Poisson's ratios result in large changes of the membrane stress.
Knowing about the very approximative character of the linear-elastic constants for
fabrics, sets of elastic constants with a high product v�.vys should be questioned and
applied very carefLilly. Which set of constants leads to analysis results nearest to the
reality has to be evaluated by tests conducted at spatial curved membranes. At the
Institute for Metal and Lightweight Structures plannings for a test rig have just
begun in order to close this lack of knowledge.

30

 

5          Conclusions

The use of sets of elastic constants which consider Poisson's ratio is recommended
for anticlastic membrane structures, where difTerent load ratios occur over the
membrane and where negative strains can occur under tensile stresses. Modeling the
transverse strains accurately increases the precision of the load bearing analysis.
In the anisotropic linear elastic constitutive law, no general limit value tor the
Poisson's ratio can be given. But for certain design situations or load ratios limit
values can be derived from the load-strain-curves in order to ensure the plausibility
of the modeled material behaviour. This was shown by simply distinguishing
between positive and negative strains in order to ensure at least, that the algebraic
signs of the strains are correct. On the other hand these limitations imply that the
large transverse strains in the load ratios 1:0 and 0:1 can not be modeled in the
necessary magnitude at the same time. These are general limits of the linear-elastic
constitutive law, which provides only three independent elastic constants.

 

31

 

The influence of the Poisson's ratio on the calculated stress values of a membrane
was demonstrated in an example. The effect showed strong over-linear behaviour for
high values of the Poisson's ratio, i.e. tiny changes of the Poisson's ratio lead to
large changes of the membrane stress. Considering the very approximative character
of the elastic constants, sets of constants with a high product of VxyVyx should be
critically analysed. Static load tests at spatial curved membranes are planned to b>e
conducted at the institute for Metal and Lightweight Structures of the University of
Duisburg-Essen to close this lack of knowledge.

Rcfcrences

[1]    MEMBRANE ASSOCIATION OF JAPAN, MSAJ/M-02-1995 - Testing
Method for Etastic Cofistants of Membrane Materials, 1995

[2J    KOENEN, R., Ztim Stand der Berechnung von Memhrankonstriiktionen,
BUBNER, E., KOENEN, R., SAXE, K., SCHURMANN, B. (eds.),
Membrankonstruktionen 5, Fachgebiet Baiikonstruktion - Konstruktive
Gestaltung, Universitiil GH Essen, 1987

[3J    BRIDGENS, B., GOSLING. P.D., PATTERSON, C.H., RAWSON,
S.J., HOVE, N., Importance ofmaterial properties in fabric structure
design i?- analvsis. Proceedings of the lASS S>mposium, Valencia,
2009. pp. 2180-2191

[4]    PESTl'X, E., WITTf��NBURG, J., Technische Mechanik, Band 2:
Festigkeitslehre, 2. Edition, B1 Wissenschaftsverlag, Mannheim, 1992

[5]    ANSYS, Mechanical APDL and Mechanical Applications Theory
Reference, 2010

[6]    SOFiSTiK 2012, documentation, 2012

17]    UHLEMANN, J., STRANGHONER. N., SCHMIDT, H., SAXE, K.,
Effects on Elastic Constants of Technical Membranes Applying the
Evaluation Methods ofMSAJ/M-02-I995, ONATE, E., KROPLIN, B.,
BLBTZINGER, U. (eds.). Proceedings of the Structural Membranes,
Barcelona, 2011

[8]    BRIDGENS, B., GOSLING, P.D., Interpretation ofresultsfrom the
MSAJ "Testing Methodfor Elastic Constants of Membrane Materials ",
BOGNER-BALZ, H., MOLLAERT, M. (eds.), TensileArehitectiire:
Connecting Past and Future, Proceedings of the 2010 TensiNet
International Symposium, TensiNet, Sofia, 2010, pp.49-57

 

A Neural Network Material Model for the
Analysis of Fabric Structures

N J Bartle' , P D Gosling', B N Bridgcns'
' School of Civil Engineering ct' Geosciences, Nex�raslle University, Newcastle upon
Tyne. NFJ 7RU. UK.
* Author for correspondence

Abstract

Neural networks are an artificial inlcllisience concept. Through a process of training
Ihey are capabic ol'capturing the relationship between experimental input and output
data. With the addition of historical inputs and internal variables it is demonstrated
that neural network models are capable of representing the complex history
dependant behaviour of architectural fabrics.

Keywords: architecturalfahric, neural network, constitiilive modeiling, hysteresis.

1           Introduction

Architectural fabrics are effectively woven composites with yam-based cores and
outer layer coating substrates. In the analysis of fabric structures it is common
practice to represent membrane material as a homogeneous continuum described by
a plane stress stress-strain relationship, where the material characteristics arc
represented by Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. Fitting a plane stress model to
biaxial test data for tyjjical architectural fabrics leads to inconsistencie.s between the
physical and theoretical descriptions, with values of Poisson's ratio in excess of the
compressibility limit offl.5, and for some fabrics approaching 2.0 [I]. An alternative
to the plane stress framework is therefore required to more correctly represent fabric
behaviour.
Neural networks offer an exciting solution for the constitutive modelling of
architectural fabrics as they are capable of capturing highly non-linear response.
Furthermore, neural network material models effectively 'learn' the material
response directly from experimental dala and therefore no assumptions regarding the
re.sponse are required.

33

2          Scope and context

The aim of this study is to develop a novel approach to represent the relationship
between fabric stress and strain which suipasses the capabilities of the current best
practice.
Through a process of training neural networks are capablc of capturing the
relationship between sets input and output data. The trained network may then be
used to generate outputs from previously unseen inputs.
To date limited attempts have been made incorporate the effects of load history and
residual strain within fabric material models. It has been shown that relatively
simple neural network models are capable of representing hysteretic behaviour
through the use of'internal variables' [2], It is proposed here to use this method to
capture the hysteretic behaviour of architectural fabric.

Neural Networks Architecture and Training

The architecture of a neural network takes on a layered form with each layer
containing neurons (Figure 2) which in turn are connected to the neurons of the next
layer via weighted connections {Figure I).

 

Each neuron sums the weighted output signals from each neuron of the previous
layer, adds a bias signal and passes the result through an activation function. This
function may be any differentiable function. In this study (and many similar studies)
a tan sigmoid transfer function is used in the hidden layer and a linear transfer
function is used in the output layer. The non-linear transfer function in the hidden
layer enables this kind of network to capture non-linear relationships between inputs
and outputs.
A multilayer feed forward neural network with a single tan sigmoid hidden layer
may be represented by the following set of equations. The fomi of these equations is

 

34

 

A number of training algorithms have been developed but the most commonly used
fall under the general term of back-propagation. In this sttidy the Matlab Neural
Network Toolbox [4J is used for the development of the neural networks,   fhe
Levenberg-Marquardt training method 'trainim' is used. A detailed description of
the method is available in [5].
A key consideration when designing Neural Networks is the issue of over fitting
where a network is trained to a point where it no longer possesses the ability to
generalise. It is therefore vital that the network is tested using previously 'unseen"
data in order to identify where over filling has occurred.

4           Response surface style network

Minami [6] extends the use of multi-step linear approximation through the use of
response  surfaces. A   pair of response                              surfaces made               up                  of triangular and
quadrilateral elements are developed from biaxial stress-strain curves obtained for
0:1. 1:2. 1:1, 2:1 and 1:0 load ratios. A plane stress material stilTness matrix is
derived for each element of the surface to be used in analysis.
Bridgens and Gosling took the response surface concept further suggesting the
complete removal of any plane stress assumption. The use of either direct look up
tables [7] or spline curves used to interpolate between measured stress strain points
within the surface [8] were proposed.
When a neural network is trained using data in the form of load ratio arms similar to
those used in [6J and [7] it may be used to interpolate between those arms thus
creating a response surface style model. As this model is easy to visualise it is
selected as a good starting point tor the initial development of an architectural fabric
neural network material model.
4.1        Training Diita Collection and Pre-Processing
A biaxial testing prollle was developed which included additional arms between the
standard 0:1, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1 and 1:0 load ratios {Figure 3). These ratios offer the
opportunity to further investigate the shape of the response surface (Figure 4) and
also provide 'unseen" testing data for network validation.

35

 

Biaxial testing and data processing closely follows the protocol laid out in [1]. In
post processing residual strain is removed from the experimental data, this is done to
remove the skew from the final response surface.
4.2        Network Testing and Validation
Within typical finite element analysis the current strain state is used to determine the
current level of stress. The current strain will therefore be used as input and the
stress as output. This leads to a network comprising two inputs (warp and fill strain),
a single hidden layer containing 10 neurons and two outputs (warp and fill stress).
Three individual sets of data are used to train the networks. Network 1 is trained
using a data set which contains the full range of load ratios. Network 2 is trained
using a data set which contains only the standard 0:1, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1 and 1:0 load
ratios. Network 3 is trained using a data set that is derived from a reversed stress
controlled version of the neural network described above. This set is also used as a
testing set along with the data set containing all load ratios. In this way the gaps
between loading arms may be investigated and cases of over-fitting may be
identified.
Because neural networks are initialised using random numbers for all weights and
biases each trained network produces a difTerent functional mapping despite being
presented with identical training data. In this study a total of 15 independent
networks have been trained and tested. The resulting coefficients of determination
are set out in Table 1.
The highest coefficients of determination are observed when a network is tested
using the same set of data it was trained with. The network trained using the partial
data set achieves the lowest performance, this is expected as this is the least
comprehensive data set.

 

36

 

 

Network Version

1

2

3

4

5

00
c

on

Fidl

0.9978

0.9991

0.9978

0.9990

0.9993

o
H

-o

Network derived

0.9936

0.9919

0.9640

0.9912

0.9814

 

 

Network 2: Trained using partial data set

 

 

 

 

 

Network Version

1

2

3

4

5

 

Full

0.9886

0.9933

0.9855

0.9938

0.9784

 

-o

Network derived

0.9772

0.9900

0.9598

0.9872

0.9649

 

 

Network 3: Trained using network derived data set

 

 

 

 

Network Version

1

2

3

4

5

c

cd
(/]

Full

0.9964

0.9951

0.9904

0.9950

0.9952

a>
1-

■S

Network derived

0.9993

0.9975

0.9954

0.9990

0.9993

 


Version 5 of Network I (Pigure 5) shows the best performance when tested with the
full range of experimental load ratios. However, when tested with the more
eomprehensive network derived data set a considerably lower performance is
observed, the effects of overflitting are clearly evident in the warp surface.
\\.\UI' Sl Kt ACi; IM.rWOKK 1|                              tILL SI kl ACi: INLrWOUK I]

 

37

 

The same procedure has been undertaken for PTFE glass fabric with reduced
success. The response surface of PTFE glass is much steeper than that of PVC
polyester fabric, this is due to the fabric's very stiff yams and high level crimp
interchange [1]. This effect leads to the requirement of the network to map multiple
pairs of strains to a single value of stress. This is impossible for the network to
achieve and therefore additional inputs are required. This same issue is encountered
when attempting to train a network to capture the hysteretic behaviour of
architectural fabrics.

5          Uniaxial network including load historj'

5.1         Internal variables
The use of internal variables is proposed by Yun et al [2] as a solution to transform a
many to one mapping to a single valued mapping in order to model materials which
exhibit hysteretic behaviour. These internal variables (Equations 5 and 6) have been
adopted to capture the uniaxial hy.steric behaviour of architectural fabric. For a
detailed explanation of the internal variables and a proof of single valuedness for a 1
dimensional mapping please refer to [2], Previous strain is denoted by £„_i and
previous stress by          Ae,, denotes the strain step.
(5)
(6)

 

38

 

5.2          Training Data Collection and Pre-Proccssing
The uniaxial testing protocol is based on the British Standard [9] (BS EN
IS01421;1998). Testing is completed using an [nstron constant rate extension
machine. Three dilVerent profiles were used to provide full data sets for training and
testing and to investigate the ideal training profile (Figure 7).

 

5.3        Network Testing and Validation
As in the previous study a basic Matlab fitting neural network is used. The network
model input comprises currcnt strain, previous strain, previous stress, and the
internal variables combined into a single input via addition. The output is the current
level of stress.
A preliminary study into the effect of training profile, training data density and
network architecture was undertaken. It was found that a reasonably sparse data
density should be used in order to obtain the best generalisation and profile three
was demonstrated to be the most successfijl training profile.

39

 

'['he llnal network has 7 hidden nodes and is trained using Profile 3. Each loading or
unloading cycle is described by 10 data points, a total of 480 input sets are used in
training. Once trained the network is tested in recunent mode, where previous
network outputs are used to generate the current network input. This is important as
it is the mode in which the network would Itc used in analysis
When tested in recurrent mode using Profile 3 the network model is shown to
successfully capture the complex hysteretic labric response {Figure 8). Deviation
observed in the latter load cycles may be due to accumulated error caused by the
recurrent mode of testing, 'llie powerful generalisation capability of the network is
demonstrated when it is tested with 'unseen' data from Profile 2 (Figure 9). The
network achieves the lowest levels of accuracy at maximum stress levels this
highlights the importance of capturing data beyond the bounds of stress range
anticipated in analysis.

6          Conclusions

It has been demonstrated by the networks described above that neural network
material models are capable of capturing the complex non-linear stress-strain
response of architectural fabrics. The response surface style network captures the
strain stress relationship in a similar manner to the plane stress framework however
removed the need for plane stress assumptions.            However, this network has
limitations when employed to model the much steeper response surface of PTFE
coaled glass fabric and neglects the effects of load history.
The uniaxial network demonstrates the capability of neural networks to model the
effects of load history. This initial study offers a promising proof of concept which
aims to lead to a biaxial response network which includes the effects of load history.

7           Further work

The development of a load history biaxial response network will require careful
design of biaxial profiles to explore the full response envelope and provide
comprehensive testing and training data sets. The effects of load step size will also
require further consideration.
The modelling of shear has been omitted from this study due to its complexity. A
novel approach would be required to capture the interaction between shear and
biaxial stress which is currently outside the scope of this body of work. Flowever,
once training data is available it is likely that neural networks will have the ability to
successfully model the shear response of architectural fabrics.
The   final    step   in   the development of neural  network  material  models  for
architectural fabrics will be to implement them within a custom fabric analysis finite
element programme. This will be achieved using a method proposed by Mashash el
al [3] whereby the network equations (Equations 1 to 4) are used to calculate an
'implied' stiffness matrix. Initial studies into this process show promising results.

 

 

41

 

Acknowledgements

This research is funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council
(EPSRC), with material contributions from Serge Ferrari and Verseidag Indutcx.

References

[IJ     Bridgens, B.N. and P.D. Gosling. New devehpments infabric structure
analysis, in HKIE/lStnictE Joint Struclwal Division Annual Seminar:
Innovative Light-weight Strucftires and Sustainable Facades. 2008.
Hong Kong.

[2]    Yun, G.J., J. Ghaboussi, and A.S. Elnashai,         new neural network-based
modelfor hysteretic behavior ofmaterials. International Journal for
Numerical Methods in Engineering, 2008. 73{Compendcx): p. 447-469.

[3]    Hashash, Y.M.A., S. Jung, and J. Ghaboussi, Numerical implementation
ofa neural netxwrk based material model infinite element analysis.
International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 2004.
59(7): p. 989-1005.

[4J    Neural Network Toolbox, [cited 2012 29th November]; Available from:
http://vvw\v.math works.co.uk/products/neuraI-network/.

[5]    Hagan, M.T. and M.B. Menhaj, Trainingfeedforward networks with the
Marquardt algorithm. Neural Networks, IEEE Transactions on, 1994.
5(6): p. 989-993,

[6]    Minami, H., A multi-step linear approximation methodfor nonlinear
analysis ofstress and deformation ofcoatedplain-weavefabric. Journal
of Textile Engineering, 2006. 52(5): p. 189-195.

[7]    Bridgens, B.N. and P.D. Gosling. A new biaxial test protocolfor
architecturalfabrics, in IASS 2004 symposium: shell and spatial
structures from models to realisation. 2004. Montpeltier: IASS.

[8]    Bridgens, B.N. and P.D. Gosling, Direct stress-strain representationfor
coated woven fabrics. Computers & Structures, 2004. 82(23-26): p.
1913-1927.

[9]    BS EN ISO 1421. Rubber- or plastics-coatedfabrics. Determination of
tensile strength and elongation at break. 1998, British Standards
Institute,

 

 

42

 

A picture frame shear test methodology to
determine accurate shear properties of
architectural fabrics

A.G. Colman', B.N, Bridgens'*, P.D. Costing'
' Newcastle University. School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle
upon TyneNEI 7RU. UK.
*Author ("or correspondence - ben.bridgens@ncl.ac.uk

Abstract
A test methodology is described that enables the application of a homogeneous stale
of shear strain to an architectural fabric test specimen with a known state of biaxial
stress. This allows for accurate and repeatable determination of the fabric shear
properties, appropriate for the analysis of tensile fabric structures. The homogeneous
shear strain field allows the shear stress to be readily inferred, without the need for
complex or theoretical correction factors. Shear stiffness values obtained using this
methodology difler to those calculated using the available design guidance.

Keywords: TensiNet, Architectural Fabrics/Textiles, Mechanical Testing, Material
Properties, Shear.

1           Introduction

Available guidance advises rule of thumb estimates when including shear stiffness
in the analysis of tensile fabric structures [1] and some analysis methods used in
industry fail to consider shear altogether [2]. This is despite the fact that shear
behaviour can significantly impact upon the results of membrane structure analysis.
Understanding and quantifying shear behaviour of architectural fabrics is important
to designers as imposed loads are re.sistcd by in-plane tensile and shear stresses. This
is achieved by virtue of a structure's anticlastic (doubly curved) surface shape,
applied pretension and large deflection behaviour [3]. Large shear deformations are
inherent in tensile fabric structures, both during installation to achieve an anticlastic

43

 

form from flat panels, and under imposed loading. Accurate determination of shear
stiffness allows for the improved prediction of deflection and formability of tensile
labric structures as well as the avoidance of wrinkling. This would allow designers
to deliver safer, more eflicicnt designs and explore more innovative architectural
forms.
The combination of an architectural fabric's base cloth and its coating, coupled with
the woven yarn structure, results in complcx in-plane tensile and .shear behaviour.
Elastic moduli, Poisson's ratios and shear stiffness are not constrained by the same
relationships as for homogeneous, isotropic materials and are arguably inappropriate
for describing this complex behaviour [4]. Coating predominantly determines shear
stillness of architectural fabrics [5] and is routinely a.ssumed to be linear [2, 6, 7],
To simulate the in situ behaviour of an architectural fabric it is necessary to
simultaneously apply predetermined biaxial tension and shear deformation. The
Membrane Structures Association of Japan (MSAJ) [8] provides the only standard
suitable  for determining shear stiffness of coated                      fabrics used              for structural
engineering applications. Therefore, development of suitable test equipment and
methodologies must be based on       the        MSAJ                      standard, design       guidance and
previously published works. Methodologies for shear testing woven materials have
been well described elsewhere, tor example by Galliot and Luchsinger [9]. 'fhe
European Design Guide for Tensile Surface Structures [10] and Galliot and
Luchsinger [9, II] offer more recent, alternative methods for shear characterisation
of architectural fabrics. However, both these methods produce non-homogeneous
shear strain distributions and con.sequently require the use of correction factors. The
method described in the European design guide also requires a hard to prepare
specimen andean only apply 1:1 biaxial stress ratios.

2           Aim

The equipment and associated methodology proposed here aims to characterise the
shear behaviour of coated woven materials subject to applied biaxial tensile loads. A
repeatable test that produces homogeneity of the strain field over the specimen
allows for simple, robust determination of the shear behaviour.

3           Methodology

3.1       Picture frame design
The picture frame shear test was selected as the preferred method for testing as it
allows for the application of uniform loading along the edge of the specimen. Four
pairs of bars clamp the specimen with pinned corner connections allowing shear
deformation of the frame (Figure 1). Homogeneity of the shear strain relies on the
clamping edge of the frame aligning with the centre of the pinned connections [12].
Furthermore, a homogeneous strain field requires that the specimen fill the fratiie
without exposing parts of the specimen not subject to biaxial tensile load [13J.
Meeting these requirements simultaneously is problematic as free yarn rotation is
prevented by the corner connections {Figure 3), results in crushing of specimen. The
novel feature of the proposed design is the non-penetrating pinned connections,

 

44

Each specimen was prepared for testing in accordance with the method described by
Bridgens and Gosling [14]; a cruciform specimen is cut from the fabric roll with the specimen arms ahgned with the yarn directions.

The specimens were then loaded to their predetermined values of biaxial stress and
held at these values to minimise the effects of short term relaxation once the
specimen is clamped in the shear frame. After preloading, the shear frame was then
secured to the specimen, allowing it to be removed from the biaxial testing apparatus
whilst maintaining the applied level of prestress. The frame was then fixed in a
uniaxial test machine where the frame subjects the specimens to a profile of shear
deformation, fhe project's industrial sponsors are interested in shear deformations
of approx. 5-6° degrees. However, the profile used to validate the frame will subject
the fabric to higher shear angles, so as to observe the ability of the corner
connections to allow for yarn rotation. Therefore, the shear test profile will achieve a
maximum angle of 15° (Figure 2).
3.3       Calculation of shear stress and strain
Shear strains during testing were calculated tising a triangular arrangement of linear
voltage displacement transducers (LVDTs). Unlike the strains, it is not possible to
measure the stresses in the centre of the sample. Only the load required to deform
the picture frame is measured and is resolved to provide the shear force, from which
shear stress is obtained, fhis approach is only valid if the strain, and hence stress, is
homogenous across the specimen. Full Held strain measurement has been conducted
using a two camera digital image correlation (D!C) setup to assess the level of
homogeneity afforded by the proposed apparatus and methodology.

 

46

4          Results and discussion

Observations of the specimen during testing provided a positive indication of the
Irame and methodology's performance. The corner detail did not induce crushing of
specimen, as was experienced with previous designs (Figure 3). The frame appeared
lo allow for the specimen to be sufllciently restrained whilst simultaneously
allowing for free yarn rotation in the specimen corncrs vvith increasing shear strain.

 

47

The results of the DlC analysis show the shear strain field exhibiting a good degree
of homogeneity with only a small variation (approx, 0.3° at  of shear deformation)
becoming apparent at high angles. No adverse effects can be observed in the corners
of the fi ame. The shear strain in the centre of the specimen is higher than the region                         
closer to the damp edges. This finding agrees with work regarding picture frame
testing of uneoated fabrics by Lomov et al. [13], This allows for simple calculation
of the shear stress as described in the previous section and shear strains can be                   
calculated from the LVDT readings. The angles ineasured in the centre of the                         
specimen, both determined from LViJT reading and DIC, are lower than the angle                        
being prescribed by the frame. Therefore it would not be advisable to use frame                      
displacement to plot the shear stress-strain relationship. The LVDTs offer a simple                     
means to do this.                                                                                                                                                        tl
The shear stress-strain plots provide evidence that the test methodology produces
repealable results (Figure 5). The results .show increasing non-linearity of the
response to shear deformation, but that at lower angles a linear approximation for
much of the curve would be reasonable for medium term behaviour.

48

 

For short term behaviour, shown by tlie first loading cycle in eacli cycle set, the
I'abric is stifTer and becomes softer during subsequent cycles. Fabrics in situ are.
therefore, likely to e.xhibil lower shear stilTness when responding to imposed loading
then at the time of installation.
The average shear moduli, G, of each cycle set ( fable 2) has been linearly
approximated for the linal      1/3 of each loading and unloading curve as well as
between the uppermost and lowest iioiiit of each cycle (tip-to-tip). This average does
not include the initial, stiffer cycle. The values .show good agreement between the
tests and demonstrate a problem with linear approximations as the choice of how to
interpret the stress-strain plot yields diilerent shear moduli. The values obtained
through the shear testing described here are significantly lower than values assumed
for analysis in the case of the PVC/PES fabric, fhe rule of thumb method described
in the European design guide [lOJ estimates the shear stiffnesses as 42kN/m. The
PTFE/glass fabric is dissimilar for lander ansiles of deformation.

 

49

 

5          Conclusions and further work

A methodology based on the picture frame shear test has been proposed, Tliis new
shear test apparatus and associated methodology aims lo allow simple determination
of the shear stress-strain relationship. Achieving a homogenous strain field during
testing allows for accurate determination of an architectural fabric's response to
shear deformation. There is no requirement for complex or theoretical correction
factors. The use of linear approximations of the stilfness values may be problematic
for the design and construction of tensile surface structures. From the results here,
short and medium term behaviour is different and materials are softer at higher
angles of deformation (further testing would be required to investigate other
materials). However, uncertainly over a choice of a single stiffness value could be

50

 

dealt with, with the use of a statistical approach that considers variabihty of all
parameters.
DevclopiTient of European standards for biaxial fabric testing and fabric structures
design are underway; the CRN TC250 Working Group 5 has been established to
write a standard for Membrane Structures for inclusion in Eurocode 10. Methods for
shear characterisation are iinpuriant but interpretation of the results must also be
addressed.
The next stage in this project is to use the methodology to investigate the effect of
difTerent biaxial tensile load on the shear stiffness of the materials.

Acknowledgements

Research funded by Architen Landrell Associates, Buro Happold, the Engineering
and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Serge Ferrari and Tensys, with
material contributions from Serge l-errari and Verseidag Indutex.

References

fl]        Barnes, M..     L. Grundig, and E.     Moncrieff, Form-Jlnding,      load
analysis and paflerning, in European design guide for tensile surface
slnictrues, B. Foster and M. Mollaert, Editors, 2004, TensiNet. p. 205-
218.
[2]       Gosling, P.D., et al.. Analysis and design ofmemhrane s/rucinres:
Results of a round robin exercise. Engineering Structures, 201,3.
48(0): p. 313-328.
[3]        Foster, B. and M. Mollaert, Engineering fabric architecture, in
European design guidefor tensile surface structrues, B. Foster and M.
Mollaert, Editors. 2004, TensiNet. p. 25-42.
[4J       Gosling. P.D. and B.N. Bridgens, Material Testing & Computational
Mechanics      -     A    New     Philosophy   For    Architectural   Fabrics.
International .lournal of Space Structures, 2008. 23(4): p. 215-232.
[5]       Skelton, .1. and J.W.I). Freeston, Mechanics of elastic peifonnance of
te.xtUe materials. Furl XIX: The shear behavior of fabrics under
hia.xial loads. Textile Research Journal, 1971. 41(1 1): p. 871-880.
[6J        Pargana, J.B.. I). Lloyd-Smith, and B.A. izzuddin. Advanced material
model for coated fabrics used in  tensioned fabric structures.
Engineering Structures, 2007. 29(7): p. 1323-1336.
[7]        Bridgens, B. and M. Birchall, Form and function: The significance of
material properties in  the design    of tensile fabric structures.
Engineering Structures, 2012. 44(0): p. 1-12.

 

51


[8]        MSAJ, Standarc/ of the Menihmne Slructurex Association of Japan.
Testing method for in-plane shear stiffness of memlvane materials.
1993, Membrane Slructures Association of Japan.
[9]       Galliot, C. and R.H. Liichsinger, The shear ramp: A new test method
for the investigation of coaled fabric shear behaviour - Fart I:
Theoiy. Composites Part A; Applied Science and Manufacturing,
2010. 41(12); p. 1743-1749.
[10]      Mollaert, M. and B. Fo.ster, eds. European Design Guide for Tensile
Surface Structures. 2004, TensiNet,
[11]     Galliot, C. and R.ll. Luclisinger, The shear ramp: A new te.st method
for the investigation of coated fabric shear behaviour  Part IT.
Experimental validation. Composites Part A; Applied Sciencc and
Manufacturing, 2010. 41(12): p. 1750-1759.
[12]      Bassett, R.J., R. Postie, and N. Pan, Experimental Methods for
Measuring Fabric Mechanical Properties: A Review and Analysis.
Textile Research Journal, 1999. 69(11): p. 866-875.
[I3J      Lomov,     S.V.,     et al..    Full-field strain measurements in textile
deformability studies.   Composites Part A; Applied Science and
Manufacturing, 2008. 39(8); p. 1232-1244.
[14]      Bridgens, B.N. and P.D. Gosling, A New Biaxial Test Protocol for
Architectural Fabrics. Journal of the International Association for
Shell and Spatial Structures (J. lASS), 2004. 45(3); p. 175-181.



52

 

Strain-controlled biaxial tests of coated-
I'abric membranes

Paolo Beccarelli', Giada Colasante", Giorgio Novali",
Bernd Stimpfle�, Alessandra Zanclli'�
' Departmelit ofAfchiteetufe ami Built Environment, University ofNottingham
Nollingham, UK
•>
' Department ofCtvH ami Environmental Engineering. Politecnico di Mi/ano.
Milan. Italy
 formTL ingenieiirefiir tragwerli imcileiclithaii GmbH, Radolftell. Germany



4


Department ofArchitecture. Built Environnient and Construction Engineering.


Politecnico di Miiano. Milan, Italy

Abstract
A better uiulcrsiaiuling of the mcchanical behaviour of coated fabrics used for
architectural membranes can lead to significant improvements in the design of
tensile surface structures,
The plane biaxial test on a cruciform specimen is considered to be the most
appropriate test to characterise the complex non-linear behaviour of such membrane
nialerial. The biaxial tests described in the literature are usually carried out under
prescribed stress histories at various predetermined stress ratios.
The present contribution reports on an ongoing research at Politecnico di Miiano
concerning strain-controlled biaxial tests, in which the strain histories in a central
portion of the specimen are prescribed. Such tests can bo particularly meaningful in
relation to membrane installation processes. Since they imply a variable stress ratio,
the results obtained by these non-traditional tests can be considered complementary
to the ones of stress-controlled experiments.

Keywords: coated fabric, inaxial test, cruciform specimen, strain-controlled test

 

53

 


1           Fiitroduction'

The main international standards for llic mechanical characterisation of coatcd
fabrics are mostly focused on uniaxial tests due to the relatively simple and common
testing equipment required. The values of ultimate tensile strength [I] [2] [3], tear
resistance [3J [4] [5J [6] and adhesion [7J arc easily determined by means of uniaxial
tests and commonly reported in the technical data sheet of the main products.
However, an adequate characterization of the mechanical behaviour of coated
fabrics is possible only through bia.\ial tests carried out with specific testing
equipments able to pull both warp and fill directions at the same time and reproduce
more complex load and strain profiles. Despite the several typologies of testing
equipments [81 the use of cruciform sample is universally considered a reliable
approach in order to obtain a uniform stress state in correspondence of the central
area of the sample.
The testing procedure for biaxial test is currently described by few national
standards [9] [10] and, due to the absence of a widely recognised procedure,
laboratories  and    engineers   have   developed   their   own    internal     protocols
[11] [12] [13].    fhe procedures are generally based     on         stress     profiles
reproduce the level of prestress assiniied in the design phase and/or the e.\pected
stress due lo the external load such as wind and snow loads. The load is applied
according to a predetermined stress rate and the elongation of the material is
constantly measured and recorded. The strain response curves in warp and fill
direction combined with the corresponding imposed stress histories, which generally
investigate several stress ratios in the two weaving directions, provide the necessary
data for the calibration of material models.
Some procedures prescribe a predetermined displacement rate like comtnonly
required by uniaxial procedures. However, due to the cruciform shape, the speed of
the actuators is not directly related to the strain rate at the centre of the sample.
Displacements at the clamps are mainly absorbed by the arms of the sample, with
potential discordant strain between the centre and the arms.
The present contribution describes biaxial tests driven by strain histories assigned to
the central zone of the cruciform specimen. This testing procedure requires a feed-
back control system: the strains measured by the extcnsometers are compared (in real-time)
 to the assigned, programmed values and the loading system automatically
adjusts to minimize the discrepancy. The results obtained by such new experimental
procedure can provide further insight into the mechanical behaviour of coated
fabrics and can give valuable information in connection with membrane installation
processes. Tor example, the knowledge of the stress level required to achieve certain
desired strains, by following a specific pre.scribed strain-path, is certainly of interest.

2          Aims of the research           

In membrane structures, which can carry load only by means of tensile stresses,
prestress is needed to ensure that the membrane remains in tension under all loading

54


t:onditioiis, and to rcdiice detlections. During the installatidn proccss, the assembled
textile panels are stretched by the prestress loading. Accurate knowledge of the
material properties is needed to estimate how much smaller the unstressed textile
panels must be with respect to their final dimensions. In current practice, biaxial
stress-controlled testing of samples from each roll of" fabrics arc carried out at
prestress loading to determine the percentage length reduction required in warp and
fill direction at installation (compensation factors) [14].
A simple case of installation of a Hat membrane tliat must be llxed to a rectangular
rigid frame is considered here. First the coated fabric is stretched along one of the
material directions (warp or fill) and fixed to the rigid support. Then the membrane
is stretched parallel to the other weaving direction and fixed lo the boundary frame.
Aim of this work is to perform some strain-controlled biaxial tests that simulate this
installation processes following two different strain-paths.
A preliminary stress-controlled biaxial test is performed up to an established pre¬
stress level   to estimate the compensation     factors. The maximum strains thus
obtained in warp and 1111 direction are successively used as final values in the strain-
eontrolled tests mentioned above,
Strain-control led tests may be useful for the definition and calibration of models for
the simulation of installation procedures, which to date are often mainly governed
by experience and "observational methods", whereby tensioning is applied as and
when required [14].
If conductcd at higher stress levels and using a mechanically conditioned material
(i.e. after performing appropriate conditioning cycles) [15], strain-con trolled biaxial
tests may also provide lin'ther information on the material Ixihaviour, which can be
used Jointly with the results of classical stress-controlled biaxial tests in order to
define the constitutive    law   for the    modelling of membrane      liehavionr under
environmental loads.

3           Expcriniciitai procedures
■fhe tested material is a PVC coated polyester fabric Kerrari Precontraint* 1002
white/blue     538    opaque     characterised      by     an     tiltiinate   tensile    strength     of
420/400 daN/m     in   warp/fill   direction    [IJ.   The    cruciform    samples    have    been
extracted     liom   the   same    batch    of material.    They    have    a   central    square of
300 mm X 300 mm and each arm is divided into three strips 100 mm wide and
200 mm long, with additional 100 mm of material used for the clamping system.
in the central portion of the squared zone of the specimen, the stress/strain state is
assumed lo be homogeneous throughout the test. Stresses can be obtained from the
forccs at the clamps (ineasured by load cells); strains are measured by two contact
extcnsometers, one mounted above the membrane (in warp direction) and the other
below (in fill direction), widi a gauge length of about 100 mm.
Strain-controlled biaxial tests have been carried out, aimed at reproducing the initial
strctching of a rectangular textile panel, which has to be fixed to rigid beams
forming a rectangular IVamc. Tests have been performed following the two different
strain-paths represented in Figure l(a,c): OAB and OA'B. The strain histories to be imposed al the centre of the specimen are plotted in Figure l(b,d). Such strain
prolilcs are relevniU to a (Irst loading ol'the membrane at inslallation. with final
values of warp and till strains given by   and £/-.

These llnal vakies of strain to be imposed during installation subordinate the initial
size ofthe unstressed membrane panel (compensation process). The actual values of
and      to be used in the strain-controlled experiments have been estimated by
preliminary carrying out a traditional load-controlled biaxial test. As shown in
l-igure 2, a crucilbrm sample was loaded with live cycles from 0.1 kN/m to 2 kN/m
at constant rate (0.1 kN/s) and using a load ratio of 1:1. The resulting strain histories
are plotted in the same figure; the maximum values of warp and fill strains turned
out to be equal to 0.33% and 0.21%. respectively. Note that these values remain
almost constant Ibr repeated load cycles.

 

56

 

In the strain-control led tests, a strain rate of 0.001% per second has bcon adopted in
both directions, which implies that the linal strain state          = 0.33%. £f - 0.21%) is
reached at t        540 s. The actual strain profiles adopted in the experiments have been
extended in time beyond t — 540 s. by enforcing five cycles in order to investigate
the gradual stabilization of the material behaviour (see Figure 3(a-b)).

The tests have been carried out with a biaxial machine {Figure 4) based on a rigid
square frame with batteries of independent servomotons, three per side, designed for
labrics and foils used in structural applications. The square frame, with a net internal

 

57

 

The axiality of the forces applied by the actuators is guaranteed by their kinematics:
each of them is free to move along the side of the frame and free to rotate around an
axis perpendicular to the sample plane. The movement along the frame is allowed by
the presence of two low friction rollers for each actuator, which are free to move
along the rail placed on each side of the frame. The actuators are based on a
brushless motor, a Planetary Gearbox and a ball screw and provide a tension force
between 1 N and 25 kN for each clamp (100 mm wide), with a maximum speed of
240 mm/min and a maximum stroke of 512 mm. Each actuator is equipped with a
force transducer which measures the force applied in the range from 1 N to 25 kN,
allowing accurate control of the linear displacements of the actuator. Elongations
(and   hence  strains)  in    (he   zone  of interest     are   measured  through  contact
extensometers. two linear potentiometers Penny & Giles SL.S095/0()30/l.2K/R/5fl
with a closed size of 90 mm and a maximum stroke of 30 min.
The strain control is performed using the following strategy; the strain to be imposed
along each of the material directions drives the displacements at the clamps of the
two specimen arms aligned with the direction in point, 'fhe three clamps at the end
of each arm are made to have the same displacement. This implies that the
corresponding forces are slightly dilTerent; however the effect on             the stress
distribution in the central area of the specimen (where strains are measured) is
negligible.

 

58

For each test, deformations in the central part of the specimen and forces at the
clamps are measured with a frequency of 2 Hz. The recording begins immediately
alter the initial tensioning of the membrane at a very low stress level (0.2 kN/m),
which is necessary to make the sample tight and to enable the extensometers to
measure the deformations correctly.

4          Experimental results

Although it is common practice [111 [14] to apply a reduction coefficient to the
applied stresses at the end of the arms in order to obtain the ones in the central area,
in the results presented below stresses are calculated from the measured forces al the
clamps without any reduction. The appro.\imation           implied                in this choice    is
comparable to other uncertainties inherent in the adopted testing procedure.
As described in the previous section, two kinds of tests, labelled A and R, are
performed: in tests of t\'iieA(B) the specimen is flrst stretched in warp (fill)
direction keeping a null value of the fill (warp) strain and successively it is stretched
in the fill (warp) direction keeping constant the warp (fill) strain.
Two test of type A (denoted by Al and A2) and two of type B (denoted by B1 and
f}2) have been carried out; the imposed strains (precisely, the strains actually
measured by the extensometers) and the stress response are shown in Figures 5-6.
Figures 7-8 show that the required (programmed) strain histories and the actual
strain histories measured by the extensometers are almost overlapping, thanks to the
efficiency of the feed-back control system (after an appropriate calibration of its PID
parameters).
A number of comments are made here below about the obtained stress responses
(Figures 5-6). Both kinds of test show a behaviour that is qualitatively the same in
each cycle, with maximum stress values that remain almost constant. The strain-
controlled linear loading in warp (fill) direction induces a nearly linear increment of
the stresses. Note that the change of loading direction determines a modification of
the stress curves slopes; this change in the slope is evident also during the
unloading, and it is more marked in the fill direction.
By comparing tests of the same tvpe. the obtained results in term of stresses are
more variable along the fill direction, especially during the first loading. This
variability between the measured stresses of different specimens is larger for tests of
type A. fhis unevenness of the results is due to the fabric weaving, characterized by
a gi'cater crimp in well direction. When the fill yarns are stretched first (test of type
B) the stress response is less variable thanks to the crimp interchange, which reduces
the level of crimp of the weft yarns. The highlighted phenomenon might even be
more marked for another type of coated fabric not manufactured          using the
Precontraint* technology (tiiat consists in applying the coating under tension, thus
reducing differences between the behaviour along the principal material directions).

 

 

59

 

shows the stress responses at                  first    loading (i.e.   corresponding to
installation). Experimental results indicate that higher stresses are required to
achieve the prescribed strains ifthe fill direction is stretched first (test of type B). In
tact, a maxiimim warp stress of 2.02 and 2,08 kN/ni and a maxiinum fill stress of
4.14 and 3.57 kN/m are recorded in tests AI and A2, while a maximum warp stress
of3.60 and 3.66 kN/ni and fill stress of 5.17 and 5.26 kN/m are measured in tests HI
and B2.
Furthermore, the stress ratio between warp and weft direction is variable during the
strain loading. Focusing the attention on the final value of such ratio, which
represents the linal state of prestress at the completion of the installation procedure,
it can be noted that in the tests of type A, the mean stress ratio required in order to
achieve the maximum level of strain is 0.54 {2.02/4.14-0.49 for test A1 and
2.08/3.57=0.58 lor test A2). On the other hand, in the tests of type B, a stress ratio of
0.7 is needed (3.60/5.17=0.70 for test BI and 3.66/5.26=0.70 for test B2).
As an example of typical stress-strain curve resulting from the kind of test described
here, in Figure 10 the warp stress-strain curve of test A2 is shown. The stresses and
strains on the axes of this plot are increments from the initial values that characterize
the prestress state (obtained by loading the membrane up to 0,2 kN/m, with a load
ratio of 1;1). The first loading curve has a slope that is slightly difTerent from the
one of the subsequent cycles: this is reasonable, since the crimp interchange in the
material is not stabilised yet. However, one loading/unloading is sulTlkient to reach
the stable condition in that specific stress level. Loading and unloading segments
have the same slope, which confirms that the material can be treated as elastic in a
certain stress/strain range, even if residual strains are show up at the end of the test.

62

 

5          Conclusions

In this paper strain-controlled biaxial tests on crucirorni specimens ol'coated fabrics
have been discusscd together with some Inst experimental resulis obtained by means
of such nonstandard testing procedure. It appears that strain-controllcd tests can be
useful ly employed to gain a better understanding of the initial mechanical behaviour
of coated-febric membranes. With reference to a simple installation process of a Hat
inembrane that must be lixcd to a rectangular rigid frame, it has been shown that
appropriate strain-controlled tests run on the basis of dilTcrcnt strain paths can be of
help    in    simulating    alternative    installation   procedures     and    in    predicting    the
corresponding required level of prestress.

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Canobbio S.p.A.. Fcnari S.A. and F.lli Giovanardi
S.n.c. for the support and Carol Monticelli for her contribution in the experimental
work, 'fhe biaxial testing equipment belongs to the multidisciplinary research cluster
on "Innovative Textiles" (ckisTEX) at Politecnicodi Milano.



63


References

[1]    EUROPEAN COMMITTEE FOR STANDARDIZATION.
EN ISO 1421 Rubber - or plastics - coatcd fabrics. Determination of
tensile strength and elongation at break, 1998.

[2]    SEIDEL M., Tensile Su)fnce SlrttcUires. A Pmclical Gukle to Cah/c and
Memhrwte ConsSmction. Materials. Design. A.sseinly/y aiul Erection.
Wiley-VCIl, Weinheim. 2009.

[3J    AMERICAN SECTION OE THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION
FOR TESTING MATERIALS. ASTM 07.51 Slanikinltest nietliodsfor
coatedfabrics. 201 1.

[4J    EUROPEAN COMMITTEE FOR STANDARDIZATION.
EN ISO 13937 Textiles. Tear projyertics offabrics.

[.5]    EUROPEAN COMMI TTEE FOR STANDARDIZATION, EN 1875-
3: 1997 Rubber- or plastics - coatedfabrics. Determination oftear
strcniith - Fart 3: Trapezoidal method. 1997.

[6]    DEUTSCHES INSTI'I UT FUR NORMUNG. DIN 53363 Testing of
plastic fihus. Tear test using trapezoidal test specimen with incision.
2003.

[7J    EUROPEAN COMMITTEE FOR STANDARDIZATION ,
EN LSO 241 I. Rubber - or plasties - coatedfabrics. Determination of
coating adhesion. 2000.

[8J    BECCARELLI P., BRIDGENS B.N., GALLIOT C.. GOSLING P.,
STIMPFLE B.. ZANELLI A„ Round-robin bia.xial tensile testing of
arcliiteciiiral coated fabrics. Proceedings of the 201 I International
Symposia lABSE-IASS: Taller, Longer, Lighter, London, United
Kingdom, 201 1. pp. I-IO.

f9]    MEMBRANE STRUCTURES ASSOCIATION OF JAPAN. MSAJ/M-
02 Testing methodfor elastic constants ofmembrane materials. 1995.

[lOJ AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS, ASCE55-I0 Tensile
membrane structures. 2010.

[II] GALLIOT C., LUCHSINGER R.H., A simple model describing the non¬
linear bia.xial tensile behaviour of PVC-coated polyester fabrics for ti.se
in finite element analysis. Composite Structures. 90(4), 2009, pp. 438-
447.

 

 

64


[12] GOSLING P.[5., BRI13GENS B.N., Material testing & computalional
mechanics: a new philosophy for architecturalfabrics. International
Journai ofSpacc Structures, 23(4), 2008, pp. 215-232.

[13] BOGNER-BALZ H„ BLUM R., KOHNLEIN J., RRiMANN K., The
stress-slrain-hehaviourfor coated orthotropicfabrics and its influence
on the analysis ofprcstressec/membranes, an approach.. Proceedings o("
the 2011 International Symposia lABSE-lASS: Taller. Longer, Lighter,
London, United Kingdom , 2011, pp. 1-8.

[14] BRIDGENS B.N., GOSLING P.D„ BIRCHALL rvI.,l.S., Tensilefabric
structures: cottcepls, practice        developments. The Structural Engineer,
82(14), 2004, pp. 21-27.

[15] BRIDGENS B.N., GOSLING P.D., BIRCHALL M.J.S., Membrane
material behaviour: concepts, practice tt- developments. I he Struct m a I
Engineer, 82( 14), 2004. pp. 28-33.



65

New Membrane Materials with Adaptive Heat
and Light Transmission Properties

Barbara Pause'
' Textile Testing dE Innovation, LLC.

Abstract

In ihis paper, new membrane materials for building applications are introdticed with
unique properties of adaptive heal and light transmission. The changes in heat
transfer and translucency are triggered by temperature. The effects are due to the
application of phase changc material (PCM). Applied to a tensile structure, the
membrane material's adaptable heat transfer characteristics reduce the structure's
air-conditioning and heating demands, and, therefore, make the building iTiore
energy efficient. The changes in the membrane material's light transmission ensure
privacy overnight and a sulllcient incidence of light into the structure during the
day.

Keywords: Phase change malerial, adaptive beat transfer, energ}' efficiency,
adaptive light transmission

1              Introduction

Architectural membranes used for tensile structures provide a relatively low thermal
insulation capacity compared to the classic building materials such as wood, bricks,
and fiber mats. Therefore, large amounts of heat penetrate daily through them,
leading to overheating of the building's interior on      hot      days.         The thermal
performance of membrane materials can be greatly improved and tailored to the
insulation needs of buildings by the application of phase changc material (PCM).
The change in the PCM's physical stale causes heat exchanges that are then used to
regulate the heat flux into and out of the structure. Furthermore, the phase transitions
lead to changes in the appearance of the PCM which can be used to regulate light
incidence into the structure.

 

 

67

 

2        Phase Change Material (PCM)
PCM changes its physical state within a oortain Icmpcratiiro range. When the
melting temperature is obtained through heating, the phase change from sohd to
liquid oeeiirs. During this melting process, the PCM absorbs and stores a large
amount of latent heat. The temperature of the PCM and its surroundings remains
nearly constant throughout the entire process. !n a cooling process of the PCM, the
stored latent heat is released into the environment and a reverse phase change from
liquid to solid takes place. The fact that a large amount of latent heat is absorbed or
released without any temperature change makes PCM highly desirable as a means of
heat storage. Suitable PCMs are paraffins, salt hydrates, organic materials, and
eutectics. The PCMs differ from one another in their phase change temperature
ranges and their latent heat storage capacities.

3              Membrane material design

In a tensile membrane application, the PCM needs to be properly contained in order
to prevent dissolution while in its liquid state. .Although PCMs are often difficult to
contain,  silicone rubber was                 found to be an appropriate carrier system.                                     In
manufacturing a membrane material, the PCM is first mixed into the components of
the silicone rubber matrix. In the next step, the compound is topically applied to a
suitable base fabric such as a fiber glass fabric by knife-over-roll coating. Then the
system is cured at a temperature above 100 "C, In order to connect two such
membrane materials to each other they may be bonded by an adhesive tape,
Tensile structures are arranged in different geographical regions,            in order to
accommodate the various climatic conditions several diiferent (mainly salt hydrate)
PCMs have been selected with melting points between 30°C and 60"C. They possess
latent heat storage capacities of up to 340 J/g,
The membrane material with PCM can be made in different versions, i.e, different
weights and thicknesses. In one version, a 0,4 mm thick fiberglass fabric was coated
on each side with a 0,8 mm thick silicone rubber compound containing 40 weight %
PCM,    The fiberglass membrane fabric with the PCM silicone rubber coating
possesses a latent heat storage capacity of about 150 kJ/nr, This is a substantial
increase in the heat storage capability of architectural membrane structures. In order
for an ordinary membrane material made of PVC coated polyester with a similar
weight to absorb the same amount of heat, its temperature would need to be raised
by about 100 "C,
The newly-developed PCM/silicone coated fiberglass membrane (PCM/S/FG) has
been tested in comparison to common membrane materials such as PVC coated
polyester (PVC/PES), PTKB coated fiberglass (PTFE/FG) and silicone coated
fiberglass  (S/KG).    Weight,   thickness  and   density of the  test    specimen  are
summarized in Table 1.



68

 

Test

Weight/area

Thickness

[density

Specimen

[g/m'j

fmmj

Lkg/m']

PVC/PES

1,450

1,40

1,036

PTFE/FG

1,550

0.90

1,722

S/FG

1,520

1.25

1,216

PCM/S/FG

1,450

2.00

725

 

 

 

 

As the test results in Table I indicate, the newly-developed PCM/silicone coated
fiberglass membrane possesses a slightly higher thickness and lower density
compared to the common membrane materials, even though weight stays roughly
the same.

4        Adaptive heat transfer properties

4.1 Thermal insulation

The membrane materials summarized in Table 1 have been tested regarding their
thermal insulation properties. A "passive thermal resistance" measurement is used to
characterize the thennal resistance value of the specific membrane material.
The heat absorption of the PCM, which takes place when a certain temperature is
obtained by heating, leads to a temporary decrease in the heat flux through the
membrane material causing an additional insulation effect measured as "active
thennal resistance".
The total thermal resistance of a membrane material equipped with PCM is the sum
of the material's passive thermal resistance and the active thermal resistance by heat
absorption of the PCM.          For membrane tnaterials without PCM the total thermal
resistance equals the material's passive thermal resistance. Test results, received for
the different metnbrane materials are shown in Figure 1.

 

69

 

Ordinary membrane materials such as PVC coated polyester fabrics and silicone
coated fiberglass possess only a low thermal resistance due to their low thickness
and high density. However, the heat absorption feature, provided by the PCM leads
to a temporary increase in the thermal resistance up to a factor of four,

4.2 Heat flux control

Without the PCM application in the tensile structure, the solar irradiation during the
day results in an increase of the solar heat gain in the building which may lead to
overheating of the enclosure in the afternoon hours. In contrast, by having PCM
integrated in the silicone coated fiberglass fabric, the membrane controls and limits
the heat flux into the structure mitigating overheating of the building. This heat flux
control is triggered by temperature. Therefore, membrane materials with a PCM
treatment are considered to be "smart" materials.
As the sun rises in the morning hours, the membrane's temperature increases and the
heat Ilux through the membrane into the structure rises. As soon as the PCM
embedded in the membrane material reaches its given trigger temperature in this
healing process, the PCM starts to absorb latent heat and its temperature remains
constant. Thus, the heat flux into the structure does not rise further. The limited heat
Ilux prevents overheating of the interior and, therefore, ensures thermal comfort also
on hot days. The stored heal is released out of the structure at night as the membrane
cools.

4.3 Thermal comfort

In order to quantify the improvement of the thermal comfort due to the PCM
application in the silicone coated fiberglass material, experimental studies were
canied out by measuring the temperature inside membrane structures with and
without PCM treatment.

70


For instance, a comparison test was conducted using two tent-like structures, one
consisted of tiie silicone coated fiberglass membrane fabric without PCM (S/FG),
and the other consisted of the PCM / silicone coated fiberglass fabric (PCM/S/FG).
The physical parameters of the two fabrics are described in Table 1. In both test
configurations only a single layer membrane construction was used. The membrane
structures were full enclosures. Temperature measurements were carried out at the
same location inside the two enclosures. The temperature development test results
obtained for the two set-ups on the same day from 9 a.m. in the morning until 6 p.m.

in the afternoon are shown in Figure 2

The test results indicate that there is a substantial delay in the temperature increase
during the day due to the limited heat incidence into the structure resulting from the
latent heat absorption of the PCM. Temperature differences of up to 6 °C were
obtained in the test.

4.4 Energy savings

As a result of the thermal comfort improvement due to the heat flux control of the
PCM, i.e. the overall air-conditioning demands of the facility on hot days will
decrease and, therefore, the structure becomes more energy efficient. In order to
quantify the energy savings resulting from a reduction in the air-conditioning
demand, a computer modeling procedure was applied. A spherical membrane
structure with a lloor space of 115 m" was used as a model building. In the
construction, about 300 m'of the PCM/silicone coated fiberglass fabric was applied
and a volume of about 660 m� was covered. Based on a latent heat storage capacity
of about 150 kJ/m� of the PCM treated membrane material energy saving of up to 30
% were calculated in the modeling procedtire.



71

 

5         Adaptive light transmission properties

5.1 Translucency

The newly developed PCM-treated membrane materials show some interesting
features regarding light transmission. First, the translucency of the PCM silicone
coated fiberglass membrane exceeds the translucency of the common membrane
materials summarized in Table 1. The test results are shown in Figure 3.

5.2 Changes in light transmission

Most of the PCMs used in the membrane material application are opaque in their
solid state and transparent in their liquid slate. The silicone coating compounds
utilized in the membrane material composition are primarily transparent. When the
PCMs absorb latent heat and melt their appearance changes gradually fiom opaque
to transparent. In the same way, the entire membrane material becomes increasingly
more translucent. The difTerence in the light transmission between the two states
(solid and liquid) of the PCM incorporated into the silicone rubber that is coated
onto the fiberglass fabric totals 27 %. The light transmission change is also triggered
by temperature. Therefore, the membrane materials with PCM treatment are also
considered to be "smart" materials in this regard.
At night, the PCM-treated membrane cools and becomes opaque, with only 26 %
light transmission in its solid state, which aids privacy. Once the PCM starts to
absorb latent heat during the day, the membrane inaterial becomes more translucent,
leading to more incidence of light into the structure during the day. When all the
PCM is melted, the translucency of the PCM treated silicone coated fiberglass
membrane will be about 53 %. Therefore, the use of artificial light in the interior
during the day can be minimized.
This melting process leads to a curious and somewhat counterintuitive effect in
which the heat radiation, most of which is in the (invisible) infrared spectrum, is
effectively llltered out. while in turn increasing the transmission of light in the

72


visible spcctriim. In a facade application, this can also eliminate the need for costly
and often complex shading systems.
Conversely, overnight, when cooler outside temperature results in the solidification
of the PCM, the light transmission across the membrane is reduced, which in turn
increases its capacity to reflect light from interior sources, thus increasing the
efficiency of interior lighting, particularly indirect lighting fixtures directed towards
the membrane.

6       Additional material features

6.1 Material aging

It is common for materials to age quickly by high temperatures and significant
temperature fluctuations. Reducing the temperature increase in the afternoon and
minimizing the daily temperature fluctuations will enhance the service life of a
membrane structure equipped with PCM substantially making the structure more
sustainable.

6.2 Temperature resistance and flame resistance

The temperature resistance and the flame resistance properties of the selected
membrane materials are summarized in Table 2.

 

Test
Specimen

Temperature
resistance
[°C]

Flame
resistance
[category]

PVC/PES

-30 to 70

C(B1)

PTFE/FG

stiff below -20

C(B1)

S/FG

-50 to 200

C(BI)

PCM/S/FG

- 50 to 200

A2/B (A2)


The temperature resistance of the membrane materials is determined by the
temperature resistance of the material                                                        used as coating compounds.                                                                            Silicone
withstands higher temperatures than PVC. When fire resistant salt hydrate PCMs are
used in the membrane material's composition, the fire resistance is enhance and
meets the reciuirements of the catcgoi y A2/B in accordance to the standard method
EN 13501-1 (or A2 according to DIN 4102).

 

73

 

6.3 Tensile strength

The tensile strength of an architectural membrane fabric is directly related to the
strength of the base fabric. The exterior coating does not contribute to the overall
tensile strength of membrane material. The PCM application in the coaling
compound does not change the physical strength of the membrane fabric at all.

7        Applications

The PCM treated membrane material is most suitable for applications in tensile
structures. Furthermore, the features of adaptive heat transfer and light transmission
properties can be beneficial when integrated in fa9ade systems or greenhouse
coverings.

8        Conclusions

The newly-developed membrane materials with PCM treatment offer a unique set of
adaptive heat and light transmission capabilities. The adaptive heat transmission
capability enables a substantial improvement of the thermal management of
buildings with membrane enclosures. The enhanced thermal management reduces
the building's air-conditioning demands, and, therefore, makes the building more
energy efficient. The PCM treated membrane material is most suitable for
applications in tensile structures. Furthermore, the features of adaptive heat transfer
and light transmission properties can be beneficial when integrated in fa9ade
systems or greenhouse coverings. The adaptive light transmission feature enables
privacy overnight and natural light in the interior of the building during the day,
reducing the need for artificial lighting, which ftirther saves energy.

 

The reduced temperature lluctuations the membrane material is able to bulTer during
the day may reduce the material's aging behavior, leading to a longer service life
and making the tensile structure more sustainable. The thermal effects provided by
the PCM application in membrane structures are durable.

References

[1]    MUELLER, J.: Silicone coated archHectural textiles. Technical 3
(2003) issue 46, pp. 34-35.

[2]     PAUSE,    B.:     Membranes    with     thermo-regnlating properties for
architectural applications, in; International Conference On Adaptive
Building Structures, Eindhoven, The Nederlands, 2006.



74

 

Day light performance of multi-layer textile
building envelopes

Florian Heinzelmann (Dipl.-Ing, Fi I)"'', Patrick TcuITel (Prof. Dr.-

I Eindhoven University of Technologv
2 Delft University of Tecinmlog\�
3 TEUFFEL ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS

Abstract
In most European countries healing requirements mai<e the bigger part of energy
spent to generate a comfortable indoor climate for the inhabitants. Here the thermal
conductivity ol the material is the key aspect of the thermal performance of the
clilTerent building parts. Membrane roofs combine .several outstanding aspects like
being applicable at light weight structures, wide spanning, etc. Because of their
lightness membranes have a poor thermal performance. Here Aerogels have great
potentials to support those positive intrinsic properties of membrane constructions
while improving the thermal behaviour,
This study looks specifically at the application of Aerogel in combination with
membrane structures in order to evaluate the potentials for natural day lighting. The
possibilities for Aerogels in the building industries are manifold.
Existing buildings windows or roof lights can be retrofitted, which leads to a better
thermal performance while the overall weight is not drastically increased (in
comparison to replacement with double or triple glazing). Mere the daylight situation
simuhaneously will be improved. The rays of the direct sunlight are scattered which
reduces the thermal solar impact in the interior. Glare is also eliminated and with
that interior visibility and an even light distribution is ensured,
The application of Aerogels for new buildings, especially for large span membrane
roof structures located in cold and moderate climate conditions has potentials. Mere
freedom of design and shape which is intrinsic to the possibilities of membrane
structure is ensured while the thermal performance can compete with or surpasses
any other wide span construction. Another point is availability of daylight. The most
surface area of a large span roof structures is e.xposed towards the sky. In common
constructions only the perimeter of those buildings or partly through sky lights

75

 

daylight is able to enter the building. These unused potentials arc adding up and
increase running costs and energy consumption for having to use artilicial lighting.
Keywords: Mtilti-kiver textiles, day light performance, insulation, aerogel

1.0 Introduction

This study looks into the possibility of applying Aerogel insulation in combination
with membrane structures and looks specifically at the daylight peribrmance and
implications for daylight autonomy. The reference which the research is based on is
a sports hall with the approximate dimension of 40m*70m.

2.0 Dayligliting

The transmittanee of natural light into the interior of the building is not only
important in terms of wellbeing and productivity of the inhabitants [1] but also in
terms of cost savings in comparison to otherwise used artificial lighting. Further
natural light possesses in general a higher luminous flux per watt heat gain in
comparison to artificial light sources. This is insofar important because this fact
sheds a different light onto the discus.sion of solar heat gain of more transparent membrane structures versus opaque oties.

Light source

Efficiacy (lumcnsAvatt)

Direct sun {low altitude)

90 Im/w

Direct sun (high altitude)

117 ImAv

f�irect sun (mean altitude)

100 Im/w

DilTuse sky (clear)

150 Im/w

Diffuse sky (average)

125 ImAv

Global (average of sky and siui)

115 Im/w

Incandcscent (I50w)

16-40 ImAv

Fluorescent ( 40w, CWX)

50-80 ImAv

High Pressure Sodium

40-140 ImAv

 


Membrane roofs are not only used as shading devices like the well-known examples
of Bodo Rasch in the Middle Bast but also to let natural daylight into the interior of
the building. Since membrane roofs transmit light in a difTused way this makes them
especially suitable for functions which require an        even   light di-stribution  like
infrastructural or sport facilities without having the negative elVect of glare through
high differences in contrast. Depending on the base material, manufacturing process
and manufacturer the Visual Light I'ransmittance (V1,T) can vary greatly. PTFE-
coated glass fabric for instance depending on its thickness and weavings can have a
light transmittanee between 5-25% [3]. In combination with Aerogel insulation this
would be further reduced but a total of 5%-7% of Visual Light Transmittanee would
be sufficient to replace artificial lighting in sports halls and reduce running costs
during daytime for the case study location Munich which is also used for the later
shown daylight simulation ease studies.

76

According to the requirements of the DIN EN          12464-1   [4J certain minima in
illumination levels have to be met. The classes shown differentiate between school
and club sports (class 111), competition and training for intermediate levels (class II)
and professional competitions (class 1). Since a lot of membranes structures are used
for covered tennis courts which are rented out to the public, the later shown assessment
orients it self to meet the illumination value of 300 ux (class III).

Class

Description

Illumination

1

competitions serious sports, training serious sports

500-20001 ux

II

competitions average level, training average level

300-1000IUX

III

competition simple, common training, sports at school

200-300IUX

 

 

 

 

Apart irom the unique material properties of Aerogel being translucent, a good
sound insulating material and hydrophobic. Aerogel displays superior insulation
qualities. Depending on the treatment of Aerogel being cither packed granules,
compressed, or as a fleece it has dilTerent thermal conductivity (>.-value) also
depending on the respective product manufacturers.
Mere Silica aerogel [5J is the most common type of aerogel. Aerogels are open-
celled. mesoporous, solid structures of a 95-99% gas content, produced by the
removal of the liquid component from a gel. without its shrinkage to occur. The
process of obtaining the porous solid framework of the gel without collapsing is
called supercritical drying.
Silica aerogel is produced by the supercritical drying of silica gel and thus the
resulting solid framework of silica aerogel is composed of nanoparticles of silica—
the oxide of silicon. It is hydrophilic due to the unreacted silanol (Si-OIl) groups on
the framework's surface, but chemical processing of silica gel before the stage of
supercritical drying can convert the linal product to 100% hydrophobic. One of the
most know attributes of silica aerogels is the high optical transparency and low
thermal conductivity of values as low as 0.012 W7(in*K). Silica Aerogel has a very
high compressive strength to weight ratio but it is very brittle.
The lower the thermal conductivity value the better is the performance. As general
indication Aerogel as such has a relatively low thermal conductivity which is only
surpassed by Vacuum Insulation Panels (VIP). Applying a 70mm layers of Aerogel
blocks (>.-value 0.012 W/(m*K)) would result in a U-value of 0.193 W/(m-K). As a
comparison this value would be reached with 20cm of mineral wool (Jv-value 0.04
\V/(m*K)), 30mm of VlPs (�-value 0.04 W/(m*K)) or 9m of reinforced concrete (a-
value 1,8 W/(m*K)). The advantage of applying Aerogel for te.xtile buildings is its
lightness with 60-80kg/m-� but also the fact that it can be applied in relatively thin
layers while having good insulation properties and will not make the construction
too thick.
The following table shows a comparison of different insulation materials in terms of
thermal conductivity, layer thickness and LJ-%alue.

 

77

Material

/.-value W/(m*K)

Thickness (mm)

Li-value \V7(m�K)

Aerogel block

0.012

70

0.193

Aerogel granule

0.018

70

0.25

Mineral wool

0.040

200

0.19

VIP

0.006

30

0.22

 

 

 

 

The above shown table only takes thermal conductivity but not transparency into
consideration. It is also a rather idealized view on Aerogel, because it is necessary to
look more closely at specific manufactLirers and their products not only in terms of
performance but also in terms of pricing and applicability for membrane structures.
The following table compares several products.

From the list only the Lumira Aerogel blanket with embedded aerogel granules in
non-woven polyester and polyethylene fibers or the Thermal Wrap are immediately
usable for membrane structures also due to their transparency. Here the Tensotherm
composite system with an outer layer of glass fiber P f FE Membrane utilizes this.
Aerogel granules as such which are also cheaper than the brittle Aerogel block
would have a lower thermal conductivity and superior light transmittance inL
comparison to the Lumira blanket. However the granules cannot be used one to one
without being integrated in some sort of carrier mat or layer.
3.0 Daylight simulation test cases

3.1 Material requirements for the test case
As location Munich was chosen to conduct the daylight simulation. Here it is
required to design metnbrane structures according to class 3 because of snow and 
wind loads. This also poses a more challenging ease in terms of day-lighting because

78

the stronger the tensile strength of a membrane, the less daylight it transmits. For the
sports hall a medium sized structure with measureiTients of 40m*70m was selected.
With a girder distance of 6,5m and fuliilling class 3, this requires the membrane
having a tensile strength of around 560daN/5cm.
In    terms of energy requirements and  resulting dernands regarding thermal
transmittanee, the German BnEV 2009 [II] (law for energy preservation in
buildings) is taken as basis for defining the thickness of the Aerogel insulation. In
accordance with the indoor temperatures requirements of 15°C-20°C for sport halls
[12] lowered values in thermal resistance according to the EnEV 2009 are applied.
Compared with a massive construction method for a sports hall which would have
10%-20% of glazed surfaces the resulting mean u-value is around 0,66 W/{m�K).
For the membrane itself various products are available. Only a couple of them match
the requirements in terms of tensile strength and light transmittanee.

3.2 Daylight Simulation setup

The daylight simulation is done from the Rhino 3D modeler with the help of the
D/VA plugin which utilizes the Radiance engine for light simulation. The material
chosen the membrane within the simulation is based on a glass material in
opposition to translucent trans material definition since it is not possible to
determine the diffuse and specular transmittanee as well as the total         light
transmittanee of the chosen material mix by the manufacturer data only. To receive
precise information this would have to be done fay physically testing in the
laboratory via a spectral-photometer according to DIN. However this poses not so
much of a problem since the main interest is to look into the quanfities of daylight
transmitted rather than the qualitative aspects. Since the membrane is spread all over
the usable surface of the hall the light distribution is in any case equally distributed

79

 

nd scattered or difTiised, In order to prool' that this approach is valid a test run was
done with a trans materia! whicii was readily available in the Rudunice material
library and the properties are based on actual material measurements,
Usually the zone of measurement is situated 0.85ni above ground. In the current set
of simulation the points of measurement are situated 5cm above ground due to the
fact that the end fields of the membrane are inclined and some of the simulation grid
points would sit in the exterior which would falsify the result.
iVIiiterial selection lor the daylight simulation
Table 6 shows the light transmissions of the membrane structures which were run in
the daylight simulations.
Case I
Control simulation in order to detenniiie the difference between glass and tranx
tnaterial in terms of illumination levels under clear sky and overcast sky conditions.
Case 2
'fhe Thensothcrm Lumira [16J membrane composite found in the product sheets
gives a range of light transmissions. The outer, mcehanical layer consists of a Saint
Gobain Shccrlill glass fiber PTKE membrane, sandwiched inside are 4 layers of
8mm Lumira Aerogel sheets and in the inner layer consists of an acoustic liner. By
looking at the dilTerent product sheets of Saint Gobain and Lumira regarding the
light transmission of the single layers it is safe to say that this setup does not match
structural requirements according to class 3. The stated U-valuc is 0.65 W/(m�K)
und light transmission 2,48%
Case 3
Another fensotherm Lumira [16J prodtiet which similar to case 2 has the same inner
layering. However by comparing several product data sheets it became clear that the
outer, mechanical layer is a Saint Gobain Sheerfil! 11-A glass fibre PTFE membrane
[15] which itself has a light transmission of 16% and with a tensile strength of
560/560 daN/5cm fullills the requirements according to class 3. The U-value of the
membrane composite is 0.65 W/(ni'K,) and light transmission is 1.72%,
Case 4
Hy looking into the results which ease 2 and case 3 delivered and the earlier stated day
light transmission requirement, this case represents the optional solution,

Case

light transmission in "/a

1 .trans material, control case

20

2,Tensotherm 32mm,

2,48

3, fensotherm 32mm, class3

1,72

4,Optimal case

6

 

 

 

The rest of the materials were dehned according to available material lists within
Radianee.

80

 

Opaque material

50% reflectance

Interior lloor

20% rellcctance

Outside ground

20% reflectance

 

 

It is important to note that the required values for illumination, thermal resistance
and tensile strength have to be checked in relation to the local building codes
individually for cach country where a sports hall will be built.       For this study the
German c{)dcs were used.        The aim is to get a constant illumination of 300 lux
throughout the year in order to achieve daylight autonomy and limit the use of
artificial lighting during the early morning, evening and winter months.

3.3 Simulations

The simulations were run based on the following geometry with the approximate
dimension of 40m*70m.

3.3.1 Case 1 trans material 20% light transmission

Date/time

Sky condition

Mean illumination in lux

21,12./12:00

clear sky with sunlight

3437

21.12./12:00

overcast sky

807

21.09./12:00

clear sky with sunlight

8020

21.09./12:00

overcast sky

1671

21.06./12:00

clear sky with sunlight

11882

21.06./12:00

overcast sky

2238

 

 

 

 

Date/time

Sky condition

Mean illumination in lux

21.12./I2:00

clear sky with sunlight

323

2I.12./12;00

overcast sky

95

21.09./12:00

clear sky with siinlighl

800

21.09./12;00

overcast sky

195

21.06./12:00

clear sky with sunlight

1286

2I.06./12:00

overcast sky

261

 

 

 

 

82

3.3.3 Case 3 Tensotheriii 32mm Lumira,  light transmission

Date/time

Sky condition

Meat! illumination in lux

21.12./12:00

clear sky with sunlight

213

21.12./12:00

overcast sky

62

2!.09./12:00

clear sky with sunlight

524

21.09./12:00

overcast sky

128

21.06.712:00

clear sky with sunlight

850

2l.06./12:00

overcast sky

171

 

 

 

 

3.3.4 Case 4 Optimal solution, 6% light transmission

Date/time

Sky condition

Mean illumination in lux

2I.I2./12:00

clear sky with sunlight

816

21.12./12:00

overcast sky

241

21.09.712:00

clear sky with sunlight

2061

21.09.712:00

overcast sky

499

21.06.712:00

clear sky with sunlight

3236

21.06.712:00

overcast sky

668

 

 

 

 

83

 

Looking at the trans material and the glass material simulations, it shows that there
is in comparison a gap in terms of percentage of design value of light transmittance
and simulated value which reaches the interior. The differcnco between trans and
glass material in percentage of reaching the interior becomcs larger the smaller the
design value of light transmission gets. This is less favorable especially for case 3
Tensotherm   1.72% material. However especially looking at the more critical
overcast sky conditions throughout the year and increasing the illumination values
by 7%, the Tensotherm structure will not meet the required illumination of 3001ux.

 

 

84

 

3.3.6 Evaluation

Case 2 with a light transmission of 2.48% is not taken into consideration since the
mechanical layer does not meet the class 3 requirements. Case 3 with the earHer
stated dillcrence in daylight simulation results regarding trans and glass material
needs a more dilTerentiatcd view. During the whole year under clear sky conditions
the structure would perform well. However under overcast, meaning cloudy sky
conditions where a fraction of daylight reaches the ground the situation is dilTerent.
Here even in summer the interior would not be sufficiently lit and artificial light
would have to be used. This should be more optimal considering the amount of
overcast or rainy days in Germany. Case 4 with a light transmission of 6% is
satisfying this demand, reaching 240 lu.\ in worst case scenario 21.12. under
overcast sky conditions. However 7%-8% would be better to reach the full 300 lux
and cover more of the morning and afternoon hours. There is currently no product
available on the market which simultaneously fulfills the requirements in thermal
resistance, mechanical properties and light transmission.

4.0 Conclusion

As earlier stated the daylight performance is greatly dependent on mechanical and
thermal  requirements which the   membrane structure should           meet          according
regulations but also on atmospheric conditions thus daylight availability at a certain
location. Further the use or function of the hall also plays a great role, e.g. in case a
vapor barrier or other layers are required this would additionally reduce the light
transmission. However this research should add a new perspective towards future
product developments also in terms of improved daylight performance. By looking
at Aerogel granules only, the light transmission of a layer of I cm is 91%. The
Lumira Aerogel blanket in comparison with a thickness of 8mm has 20%. Here lays
untapped potential to further optimize translucent insulations towards an increased
light transmittance. This is even more important under the consideration that the
above shown simulations just met the minimum requirements in terms of thermal
resistance according to the EnEV 2009 with reduced inside target temperatures. That
means if one considers to build a daylight performing membrane hall under tighter
regulations in terms of thermal performance or a low-energy hall, the layer thickness
of the insulation has to be increased thus the light transmission will decrease. Again
looking at the sole Aerogel granules versus the I.umira blanket (table 4) the
dilTercnce in thermal conductivity 0,018 W/{m*K) versus 0,023 W/(m*K) is not that
large, meaning improvement in terms of thermal performance of a new product and
reduction of insulation thickness will not be that drastic. One has to look for another
way to embed Aerogel granules into a fiexible blanket or sheets where the carrier
material which prevents the granules from accumulating at certain locations and
forming thermal bridges let daylight pass in a better way. Here the Phi J research by
Markus Holzbach [17] which proposes to embed Aerogel granules into a so called
fnversmatrix shows a promising direction. However the work was carried out with
the integration of several   functions in mind rather than exclusively daylight
transmission, thus leaves room for improvement. Finally the costs of Aerogel
products have to be considered. Again the price difference between Aerogel
granules and the Thermal Wrap (table 4} is drastic. This is due to the fact the

85


Thermal Wrap embodies a lesser volume of Aerogel granules (Ihus lowered thermal
resistance).

5.0 Outlook

The only way to make ftiture Aerogel products more ajipealing to the building
industries and bring the initial cost versus the running cost (electricity saving for
artificial lighting) into an economic balance is by being able to produce Aerogel
more cheaply. According to predictions, in 2050 [I8J aerogel will be commonly and
widely applied (equally to plastics today), significantly contributing to the solution
of future environmental problems. Although the raw material for the silica aerogel
production is among the most abundant elements in earth, silica aerogel is still very
expensive. The high cost is mainly related to the supercritically drying production
technique that requires the development of high temperatures and pressure and
produces in relatively small batches. There are several researches on the way which
claim to be able to reduce manufactin'ing costs of Aerogel by 80%-90% in the near
future. Here Maerogel, an aerogel made of rice husk developed at the Universiti
Teknologi Malaysia [19] or Quartzene by Svenska Aerogel AB [I8J are some of the
developments to keep an eye on.

6.0 Annex

SI units:



Thermal conductivity X-value:
Thermal resistance R-vaUie:
Thermal transmittance U-value:
Illuminance:


\V/(m*K)
(m�K)/W
W/(m=K)
!ux(lx)



References

fl]     HESCHONG MAHONE GROUP, Windows and Offices: A Study of
Office Worker Perfonncmce and the Indoor Environmen! - CEC,
http://w\vw.h-m-g.com/projects/daylighting/summaries on
daylighling.htm#, 2012
[21   NATURAL FREQUENCY, Daylight & Sunlight,
http;/Aviki.naturalfrequency.com/wiki/Daylight_Sunlight, 2013
[3]     I MGHTEX, PTFE-glass,
http://ft'ww. h i tih texworI d. com/images/pd Phi iihtex nt fe-
glass properties e.pdf. 2013
[4]    Empfohlene Beleuchtimgssidrken nach DIN EN 12464-1
[5]    AEROGEL.ORG, Silica Aerogel, http://www.aerogel.org, 2013
[6]    U-WE RT.NET, Online Berechnung Hirer Wcinneddmmiing, www.u-
wert.net,2012

 

86


[7]    CABOT, Limiira Tmnslucenl Aerogel LA 1000 LA2000,
http://v\'\v\v.cabol-corp.coni/\vcni/dovvnload/en-
us/ae/Data%20Shet;t%20LuiTiira%20Aerogel%20LA 1000_2000%2012
_2011,pdf, 2013
[81    CABOT, Liiniira Aerogel Blanket LB800, http://www.cabot-
corp.coin/wcm/download/en-
us/ae/Dala%20Sheet%20LLimira%20Aerogcl%20Blanket%20LB800_5
_20l 1 Jmal.pdt; 2013
[9]    CABOT, Thermal Wrap TiV350, 600. �00, http://www.cabot-
corp.com/wcm/download/en-
us/ae/Data%20Sheet%20Thermal%20Wrap%20T\V350_600_800_4_20
llJ-lNAL.pdi: 2013
[10] ASPEN AEROGELS, Spaceloft (dala sheet),
http://\vww.aerogel.com/products/pdfSpaceloft_DS.pdf, 2013
LI I] ENEV2009.
hUp://ww\v.enevonliiie.oi'g/enev_2009_volltext/enev_2009_anlage_02_
anforderungen_nichtwohngebaeudc.pdf, 2013
[ 12] http://w\vw.um.baden-wiierltcmberg.de/servlct/is/44899/j_2013
[13] SERGE FERRARI, Textile Architecture                           (Technical data
sheets), http://architecture.sergcferrari,fr/Lightweight-composite-
textiles, 2013
[14] VERSEIDAG COATINGS AND COMPOSITES, MEMBRANES
Architecture (Technical data sheets).
http://www. verscidag.de/en/en/duraskin/architccture/ni embranes/membr
ancs, 2013
[ 15] SHEERFILL SAINT-GOBAIN, Architectural products (Technical data
sheets), http;//\vw\v.sliecrflll.com/arciiitectural-membranc-
products.aspx, 2013
[16] BIRDAIR. Tensulhenit Performance Characteristics,
lcnst)therm_Per fCharac.pdf
[ 17] HOLZBAC11 M.,Adaptive undkonditionierte textile Gehaeudehuellen
aufBasis hochintegrativer Bauteile. ILEK. Stuttgart, 2009
[18] AEROGEL, Cost-effective manufacturing,
http://vvww.aerogel.se/technology/cost-efTective-manufacturing/, 2013
[19]    MIGIIT,/im;i?t'/,
http://wvvw.might.org.my/tda/Publications/Aerogel.pdf, 2013



87

 

An iterative algorithm to optimize the stress
distribution of an equilibrium form by
using the force density method

Dr. Fevzi DANSIK'-� Dr. Meltem SAHIN''"
 Asxixlafit Frofex.soral Mimar Sinaii Fine Art Uriivar.sin�
Partners ofFabric Art Mcmhrane Structures

Abstract

The force density method has been developed to solve the non-linear system of
equilibriLiin equations for a network of elements, which have no flexiiral rigidity and
are pin connected. This solution is achieved by detniing a ratio between the force
and the length of each element, which gives the name for the method. Consequently,
the non-linear system of equations becomes a linear one for the given set of force
densities. Hence, it is possible to obtain a diflbrent equilibrium form for eacli
dif!erent set of force densities ibr the same network. Furthermore, ditVerent element
forces and stresses are obtained for each difTerent set of force densities,

The introduced algorillim also works networks with compression element such as
tenscgrity systems. Furthermore, il is also possible to obtain minimum surfaces by
defining proper boundary conditions,

Keywofds: Form Finding, Afchitecturai Fabfic, Geometric Non-Linear Analysis

1           Introduction

The force density method has been developed to solve the non-linear system of
equilibrium equations for a network of elements, which have no llexural rigidity and
arc pin conncctcd [I ]. This solution is achieved by defining a ratio bctw�ccn the force
and the length of each element, which gives the name of the method as 'Force
Density', The non-linear system of equations becomes a linear one for the given set
of force densities. Consequently, the equilibrium form of the network is achieved by
solving the linear system of equation for the given force densities. Hence, it is

89

 

3          Iterative Algorithm

The algorithm starts with a set of force densities, which refers to a group of elements
with diOcrent mechanical                                                                          properties of the considered network.                                                   In order to
elaborate, consider the cablc net configuration in Figure 2 and let the cross sectional

 

91


area of the boundary cables is 5 times more than that of the inside cables. The steps
of the algorithm are described as follows:
Step I; To begin with, let the force densities of the element of the initial form in
Figure 2 be equal to the cross sectional area of the cables in order to impose
the relative stiffness difference between the cables.
Step 2; Obtain the equilibrium form by solving the linear system of equations for
the defined force densities in Step 1.
Step 3: Calculate the element lengths, forces and stresses.
Step 4; Calculate the average element stress by simply dividing the overall sum of
the element stresses with the total number of the elements.
Step 5:    Find the minimum and maximum stresses.
Step 6:    Calculate 'the stress ratio' by dividing the minimum stress with the
maximum stress. If the stress ratio is 1, which is the limit, there will be no
stress difference over the surface and hence the surface can be considered
as 'a minimum surface'. Although it is possible to reach the limit with the
proper boundary conditions, the aim of the algorithm is not to seek
minimum surface but to minimise the stress variation over an equilibrium
form. Hcnce, the relative difTerence between two consecutive steps is
considered as the termination criteria of the algorithm.
Step 7:    Terminate the iteration procedure if the relative difference of the stress
ratios between two consecutive steps is equal or less then the defined
convergence limit.
Step 8:     If Step 7 is not satisHed, terminate the iteration algorithm if the allowed
number of step is reached. This is necessary if the process is not
converging.
Step 9:    Calculate the element force density for the next iteration cycle by using the
average force, which is simply obtained by multiplying the average stress
with the area of the considered element, and its length in the equilibrium for
obtained in Step 2.
Step 10: Go to Step 2, but this time use the force densities calculated at Step 9 and
continue until the conditions in Step 7 or 8 are satisfied.
At each repetition of the above process, the stress ratio changes. This can be
observed from Figure 4 where the stress ratio is plotted for each repetition of the
above process. In the present case, after 16 iteration steps, the stress ratio of the
configuration is found to be 0.99999. This value is very close to 1 which is the
'limit' value for the stress ratio of a conliguration. The closer the stress ratio is to the
limit, the more regular the stress distribution of the configuration.
It can be seen (rom Figure 4 that the changc in the stress ratios for any two
consecutive iterations becomes smaller as the iteration process progresses. For
example, the stress ratios for the first and second iteration steps are respectively
0.587 and 0.860. The difference between the stress ratios for these two iteration
steps is 0.273. At the seventh iteration step, the diflerence is less than 0.001, The
changes becomc smaller in a nonlinear fashion as the iteration process progresses.

92

 

l-inally, the iicralion process is terminated at the sixteenth step when (he change in
the stress ratios lor two consecutive steps is equal to 0.00001. The resulting
equiiibrium  form al this iteration step is given in Figure 3, along with the
equilibrium  form obtained at Step 2. In the  ligure, solid lines indicate the
equilibrium form obtained by using the iteration algorithm, and dashed lines indicate
the equilibrium form at Step 2.

The changes ofthe atress ratios for the present case
The changes in the maximum, minimum and average stresses for each iteration step
are presented graphically in Figure 5. As can be seen from the figure, the maximum
and minimum stresses converge rapidly to the average stress as the iteration process
progresses. At the end of the iteration process, all the element stresses are almost
identical. Despite the fact that the stress ratio has changed significantly and has

93

become almost the same, the equilibrium form has not changed significantly as can
be seen from Figure 3.

 

The algorithm for the above process is shown as a flowchart in Figure 6. In the
flowchart;
•     q denotes the force density of an element,
•     A denotes the cross-seclional area of an element,
•     R denotes the stress ratio of the configuration,
•     L denotes the length of an element,
•     A denotes the limit on the dilTerence between the stress ratios for two
consecutive iteration steps, referred to as the 'convergence tolerance',
•     P denotes the internal force of an element,
•     S denotes the stress for an clement,
•     Sniax, Sn,[„ and SavL- denote the maximum, minimum and average stresses in the
configuration, respectively,
•     M denotes the maximum number of iteration steps allowed,
•     superscript i denotes the number of iteration step and
•     subscript e denotes the number of an element

 

 

94

 

4          Implementation of the algorithm for tensegrity systems

All the elements of the configuration in Figure 3 are defined as cables and hence
they can only take tensile forces. However, the force density method works for
elements with only axial stiffness regardless the direction of the force. If an element
has to be in compression, its force density is simply defined as a negative value. If a
configuration consists of only compression elements, the algorithm will work with
the .same principles as described in Section 3. If a configuration consists of tension
and compression elements such as tensegrity systems, the force density method will
work without any problem other than singularity problems that may occur due to
zero diagonal elements of the primary force den.sity matrix for the system. However,
the iteration algorithm cannot be used for the following reasons;
•     Firstly, since there are positive and negative stresses in a tensegrity form, the
average stress of the configuration may become zero, very s?Tiall, a positive value
or a negative one. This causes divergence for the iteration process. More
importantly, it is not logical to seek the same stress values for two different kinds
of elements.
•     Secondly, the iteration process is terminated when the difference between the
stress ratios for two consecutive iteration steps is less than or equal to the defined
convergence tolerance. However, as discussed above, the stress variation of a
tensegrity form cannot be defined by using one overall stress ratio. Instead, two
stress ratios are necessary to define the stress variation of a tensegrity system,
one    for    the    tension    elements  and    one    for    the    compression  elements.
Consequently, the termination criterion of the iteration process must be satisfied
for the both tension and compression elements.
With the above observations in mind, the iteration process is developed in the
following manner:
•     Instead of calculating one average stress for a tensegrity system, two average
stresses arc calculated, one for the tension elements, positive stresses, and one
for the compression element.s, negative stresses.
•    The element force densities of the next step are calculated by using the positive
average stress for the tension elements and using the negative average stress for
the compression elements. The maximum and minimum stresses are found out
for the tension elements and the compression elements, separately.
•     Then, the stress ratios for the tension elements and the compression elements are
calculated.
•    This process is carried out until the teriTiination criterion is satisfied for both the
tension and the compression elements.
To elaborate, consider the configuration shown in Figure 7. This configuration is a
double layer tensegrity system where the top and the bottom layers consist of
tension elements and the vertical web elements are compression elements. The
compression elements are indicated with double lines in Figure 7. Let the axial
stiffness of the compression element be 5 times more that of tension elements.
Hence, let the element force densities of the initial configuration be 1 for the tension

96

elements and -5 for the compression elements in order to impose the relative
stifthess difference between tiie elements. Then, the same iteration steps can be
carried out with the above modifications. The resulting eqtiilibrium form for the

contlgtiration 

 

The changes of the stress ratio arc given graphically in Figure 9. It can be noted
from Figure 9 that the stress ratio for the compression elements converges to the
limit ratio relatively quicker than that of the tension elements. Also, it is seen that
the compression elements satisfy the termination criterion ait the 6th step of the
iteration process. However, the iteration process is kept going until the tension
elements also satisfy the termination criterion at the 20th step.

 

97

 

5          Conclusions

The introduced algorithm minimises the ditTercnce between the minimum and
maximum stresses drastically and rapidly. It is also possible to reach to the limit
value, which is 1, as in minimum surfaces as long as the boundary conditions arc
properly defined. The extensive research has been can ied out in reference [2] for the
introduced iterative algorithm. Furthermore, another iterative method [2] has been
developed to minimize the variation of element lengths in the same manner
introduced in this paper.
The other advantage of the algorithm is that the force densities are not directly
defined as constant values, but instead they are derived by the iteration algorithm
according to their mechanical properties with respect to their relative correlations.
The algorithm works for the network with different element properties as in
tensegrity systems. This can be extended to the network with more element tjpes
such cables, struts and membrane elements. Different types of element force density
matrices such as triangles and quadrilateral can also be developed as briefly
described in Section 2.

References

[16j SCHEK H J, Theforce density methodforform Jinding and computation
ofgeneral network. Computer Method in Applied Mechanics and
Engineering, 4, 1974, pp 115-134

[17] DANSIK, F, Force Density Method and Configuration Processing,
Ph D Thesis, 1999, University of Surrey, Guildford, U.K.

98

 

AA/ETH Pavilion

I            ■            "2

' Chair ofStructural Design, DA RCH, ETf! Zurich, Switzerland
' Chair ofStructural Design, DARCH, ETff Zurich, Switzerland

Abstract

Lightweight stru;:tufcs arc conventionally associated to membrane and pneumatic
constructions. Aiming at rethinking this paradigm, a research collaboration between
the EmTecli E�rogramme (AA School, London) and the DARCH Chair of Structural
Design (liTH Zurich) has been recently activated to explore the potentials of the use
of plywood in lightweight structural design. As a result of this collaboration, a
temporary lightweight pavilion has been designed and built for the grand staircase of
the LTH Scicnce City Campus. The pavilion consists of three non-standard 18mm-
thiek panels of plywood (up to 11 .Om by 2.5m) which have been individually bent
around their transversal axis and connected together by a sequence of steel cables.
Globally, this form-active structure has a maximum span of 8.5m and works as a
system of self-stabilizing lightweight vaults. Moreover, the architectural qualities of
its emerging spatial enclosure allows for the grand staircase to be activated as a new
all-year meeting space tor the students and faculty. A nonlinear static parametric
digital model, based on the bending energy of the panels, has been calibrated with
extensive physical tests and employed to explore different design solutions. The
shape of the panels after the bending process emerged out of their initial non-
deiormed geometrical layout (geometrical parameter), the thickness and hierarchical
organization of the wooden plies (material parameter) and the given load conditions
(external constraint). By a systematic investigation into the defining parameters it
has been possible to control the stiffness of the panels along their own longitudinal
axis. This has allowed for their bending behaviour to be adjusted to achieve the
required curvature. Employing panels of different lengths has made it possible to
partially overlap adjacent elements and connect them together with a sequence of
cablcs that stabilize the system and let the external forces to be evenly transferred
within the structure.

Keywords: Lightweight, ply\wod, form-active, nonlinear static parametric model,
bending energy.
99

            Introduction

Traditionally, lightweight striiclurcs arc dircctly associated with tensile structures
like    stressed  membranes  or    pneumatic   constructions. Such    structures  are
characterized by a direct relationship between form and force resulting in an
ef'Iicient use of material due to the optimal use of materials strengths. Because of
this, one of the guiding principles in the design of lightweight structures is the
avoidance of elements stressed by bending in favour of elements stressed purely
axiaily by tension or compression [7]. 'fhe AA/ETH Pavilion has been designed by
rethinking this principle in order to extend the notion of lightweight structural
design.
'fhe AA/ETH Pavilion is an experimental construction that has been designed and
built out of a collaboration beiween the EmTech Programme {AA School, London)
and the DARCf! Chair of Snuctural Design (ETH Zurich) during the Academic
Year 2011-2012. The project is based on the architectural exploration of the bending
behaviour of plywood and the use of it in lightweight structural design following a
research-by-design approach.
hiitiaily, the pavilion has been conceived as a .short-term lightweight sun-shading
construction for parts of the grand stairca.se on the Stefano Franscini Plaza at the
ETH Sciencc City Campus. The spatial enclosure generated by the pavilion allowed
for the grand staircase to be effectively activated [Fig. IJ and the pavilion soon
became a new meeting space for both ETIl students and faculty. Thus, the pavilion
had been actively employed as an outdoor venue for about nine months (August
2011 to April 2012).

 

100

 

2            Project Description

The structure of the pavilion is based on three bent panels of plywood with non¬
standard dimensions, up to 2.3m in width and 10.3m in length. Each panel is made
up of six cross-banded veneers - four veneers with Hbres in longitudinal direction
and two veneers in lateral direction - bonded together with plienol resin adhesive.
The nominal thickness of the veneers is equal to 3.0mm resulting in a total thickness
of the panels of 18mni. Although birch (Retula pendula, hardwood) is usually
preferred for structural applications due to its superior mechanical properties, spruce
(Picea abies, softwood) has been employed to take advantage of its lower Elastic
Modulus in the bending process during the construction phase.
Ba.sed on the knowledge gained during the experimentation carried out throughout
the design phase, the arrangement of the veneers in each plywood panel is
specifically defined to control the overall bending behaviour of the panels. In
addition, each panel is cut in a specidc triangular shape [Fig. 2] to adjust the tlexural
stiffness along its longitudinal a.\is and consequently its bent shape. With the same
purpose, cuts in the panels are pre.sent which also allow for a sequence of laniellas
working as sun louvers to be integrated into the design [Fig. 3]. The bent panels are
connected to the ground by means of live pinned supports consisting of plywood
Ibrks fixed to steel channels [Fig, 4].
The panels are connected together through a sequence of stainless steel cables [Fig.
5], The cables stabilize the overall structure and let external forces to be evenly
transferred within the system, i.e. the connected panels function as one unique
structure. Because of this - contrary to lightweight constructions like membrane
surface structures - the overall shape of the pavilion is stable under point loads, like
leaning user.s, or wind and snow loads. Globally, the form-active structure of the
pavilion works as a system of sell-stabilizing lightweight bairel vaults. The total
mass of the pavilion accounts for 326kg while the maximum span is 8.50m.

101

Structural Behaviour

With regards to the design concept, the main idea behind the design of the pavilion
has been to explore the opportunities of the use of plywood in lightweight structural
design by taking advantage of the material properties as well as by testing
unconventional construction processes.
Tlie pavilion is the result of a form-finding process in which each plywood panel,
starting fi-om an undeformed flat state, has been deformed and bent around its own
transversal axis to its final form-active structural state. Thanks to this operation, the
flat surfaces of the panels have been turned into three-dimensional ones, allowing
for a spatial enclosure to emerge and revealing the architectural qualities of the
structure [Fig. 6].

102

 

Precedents to this field of research by design on plywood commenced with the work
of A. Aalto and C. Eames [6]. Experimentation on bending plywood has been
extensively conducted over the last decades. Reccnt contributions include the
Omamentation vl.O by S. Tibbits [8] at the MIT - Massachusetts Institute of
Technology (2008) and Datareef by Probotics [5] at the AA DRL - Architectural
Association  Design   Research  Laboratory  (2010).  Nevertheless,  the   pavilion
represents one of the first attempts of exploiting the opportunity of bending plywood
to produce a fiill-scaie architectural prototype.
As a first step to understand the structural problem of bending plywood, an
analytical approach has been deployed to describe the behaviour of a simple bent
lath with constant flexural stiffness (EI) along its longitudinal axis. The shape taken
on by thin beams under bending moment has been systematically investigated in
previous works. As observed by [1], the curvature (k) of a thin beam of length (L)
along its longitudinal axis varies in proportion to the bending moment (M) and in
inverse proportion to the flexural stiffness (EI). The bending strain energy for a thin
beam with constant flexural stiffness along its longitudinal axis is equal to:
1

.v=0
Formula 1 Bending strain energyfor a thin beam with constant
flexural stiffness along its longitudinal axis.

According to the principle of minimum total potential energy, a bent thin beam, such
as the analysed plywood lath, deforms to the shape that minimizes its internal strain
energy.
As shown in [2], after assuming a parametric fijnction to describe the deflection (w)
of a bent lath, a numerical method can be employed to evaluate for which
parameters the total potential energy is at a minimum. In this way, the shape
assumed by a regular bent lath with constant flexural stiOhess along its longitudinal
axis can be calculated.
The analytical approach can be effectively deployed in case of regular geometries
and simple boundary conditions as the lath previously described. In the situation of
plywood panels with non-regular geometry and changing flexural stiffness along the

103

 

longitudinal axis the analytical approach cannot be applied easily. In order to
investigate the behaviour of the pavilion, therefore, another approach have been
employed, namely physical and digital form-linding experiments.
Overall, the shape of the plywood panels after the bending process depends on their
initial undcforined geometrical layout (geometrical parameter), the thickness and
hierarchical organization of the wooden veneers {material parameter) and the given
load conditions (external constraint).
With regards to the physical form-finding experiments, a series of prototypes based
on scaled-down plywood panels have been produced as a first approach to the
research on the geometrical and material parameters. In relation to the geometrical
parameter, as also shown in the research of J. Huang and M. Park under the
supervision of A. Menges at Harvard GSD - Graduate School of Design (2009) [3],
by gradually varying the cross-section of        the panels and as such the flexural
stiffness along their longitudinal axis, it has been possible to control the bending
behaviour of the panels and their curvature after bending.               In addition, after
introducing cuts in the panels, the flexural stiffness along their longitudinal axis
could be reduced and their bending behaviour could be further adjusted [Kig. 7J.
Furthermore, the cuts introduce flexible lamellas into the pavilion that function as
sun-shading device and at the same time as system for the dissipation of wind loads
through vibration. In relation to the material parameter, different arrangements of the
veneers in tlie plywood panels have been tested in order to control the Elastic
Modulus (E) and adjust the overall bending behaviour of the panels.

The physical experiments has been used to calibrate a parametric digital model to
efficiently simulate and explore dilTerent design solutions at full scale. The model is
based on a nonlinear FEM (Finite Element Method) elastic solution to specifically
perform the analy.sis of plates undergoing large deflections. After setting up the
material properties (material parameter) and the boundary conditions (external
constraints), various geometrical configurations (differing according to the global

104

geometrical layout and the number of cuts iti the plate) have been extensively tested
until the final curvature of the panels fulfilled the architectural requirements. In
addition, due to the irregularities of the site, a final adjustment of the geometrical
layout of the panels has proven to be needed after the bending simulation. This
modifications to the geometrical parameter in turn affected the bending behaviour of
the panels requiring new iterations in the simulation process until a fuial valid shape
has been found.
The final shape of the panels emerged out of the equilibrium of the internal forces
(self-weight and stresses introduced by the bending process). Although the panels
showed to be stable under their self-weight, due to their high slenderness in the
direction of the longitudinal axis, they proved to be highly unstable when subjected
10 concentrated loads or non-symmetrical distributed vertical and horizontal loads.
A solution to this problem has been investigated using a graphical static approach
[4]. Unless the funicular polygon of the loads falls inside the geometry of the panel,
the panels can resist the external loads only through their own llexural stiffness.
Thus, in order to increase the global stability of the structure and allow the funicular
polygon of the external loads to always be within the geometrical boundaries of the
system, a sequences of stabilizing pre-stressed cables has been introduced. By
constraining the panels to their initial position, the cables allow for the external
conccntratcd and non-symmetrical distributed loads to be evenly transferred within
the structure to the foundations, hi addition, employing panels of different lengths
has made it possible to partially overlap adjacent elements. By connecting the
adjacent panels together through the cables, four main arches has been established,
whose structural depth is higher than the ones of the individual panels. In this way, a
load-bearing system can lie produced within the structural depth of the arches that
follows the funicular polygon of the external loads [4]. In particular, a specific
geometrical  configuration of the  cables  has   been    designed  that   takes   into
consideration the maximum structural capacity of the plywood panels and their
buckling behaviour.
The efficiency of the lightweight structural system has been validated by a final load
test [Fig. 9]. Tor the test, a bag was fixed at six points to the arches and gradually
filled with water. At a load of 800kg, that is about 2.5 times the self-weight of the
structure, the test had to be aborted due to the dissolution of the structural integrity
ofthe bag. At that point, the maximum displacement of the pavilion reached 3.5cm.

4          Construction

A non-conventional manufacturing process has been employed to produce the
plywood panels constituting the main structure ofthe pavilion in order to address
their non-standard dimensions. Standard-sized plywood veneers have been directly
glued together and connected by means of half-lap joints in the workshop to produce
unique plywood panels with the dimensions required. In spite of their non-standard
dimension, thanks to their relative lightweight (around 110kg each), the panels have
been easily handled, moved and assembled by a team of twelve students of EmTech
during the construction process.

 

105

The construction of the pavilion followed a process similar to the one employed in
the production of the physical scaled-down model during the design phase.
Handmade cut panels have been produced and put in place without employing any
crane or mechanical equipment. This has been achieved by manually lifting the
panels  from   beneath  while   imposing  a horizontal  displacement along   their
longitudinal axis to adjust the panels to their final position [Fig. 8]. The geometry of
the   final stiucture proved to be very close to the digital model developed in the
design phase. Irregularities in the geometry coming from the manufacturing process
has been evened out by taking advantage of the material tolerances.

 

5          Conclusion

As an experimental construction which follows a research-by-design methodology,
the AA/ETll Pjivilion is a result of a holistic approach to design where architectural
qualities and structural performances are part of the same agenda. In fact, structure
and architecture are evenly integrated within the same building,
The design of the pavilion effectively relied on a lightweight structural design
approach and successfully took advantage of the opportunity of bending plywood to
produce a full-scale architectural prototype. Bending was used in the form-finding
process and the final shape of the plywood panels corresponds essentially with the
resulting shape under self-weight. This shows, that the bending behaviour can be
used in the design of lightweight structures. In addition, a design process based on
the combination of analytical, physical and digital form-finding allowed for the
goals of the project to be achieved while proving to be a flexible and powerful
methodology.

Acknowledgment

The design and construction of the AA/ETH Pavilion has been possible thanks to the
contribution and constant support of a wide group of students and tutors both at the
EmTech (AA School, London) and the DARCH Chair of Structural Design (ETH
Zurich):
Project Coordinator: Toni Kotnik (ETM DARCH; AA EmTech)
Academic   Supervisors: Toni   Kotnik (ETH  DARCH,   AA   EmTech),  Michael
Weinstock (AA EmTech), George Jeronimidis (AA EmTech), Wolf Mangeldorf
(AA EmTech, Buro Happold)
Competition Team: Norman Hack, Pierluigi D'Acunto, Camila Rock De Luigi,
Paula Velasco, Shibo Ren, Shanky Jain, Alkistis Karakosta (AA EmTech)
Design Team: Norman Hack, Pierluigi D'Acunto, Camila Rock De Luigi, Paula
Velasco (AA EmTech)
Project  Management;   Darrick  Borowski  (AA   EmTech),   Ozgiir   Keles   (ETH
DARCH)
Structural Design: Pierluigi D'Acunto, Shibo Ren (AA EmTech)
Structural Consulting: Luke Epp (Buro Happold), Joseph Schwartz (ETH DARCH)
Shading Analysis: Yassaman Mousavi (AA EmTech)
Fabrication Team: Fatima Nasseri, Yassaman Mousavi, Paula Velasco, Camilla
Rock De Luigi, Shanky Jain, Sherwood Wang, Nicolas Villegas Giorgi, Norman
Hack, Pierluigi D'Acunto, Gabriel Ivorra, Sebastian Partowidjojo (AA EmTech)
Steel Work: Peter Jenni (ETH Metal Workshop D-BAUG)
Wood Work: Oliver Zgraggen & Paul Fischliu (ETH Carpentry)

 

107


References

[1] HORN B.K.P., The Cun'L' ofLeas! Energy. ACM TransacHon on
Malhemalical Software, Vol. 9, No. 4, December 1983, pp. 441-460.
[2] KUI.)VENHOVI-N iVl., HOOGENBOOM P.C.J., Parlicle-Spring Method
for Form Finding Grid Shell Structures Consisting ofFlexible Members.
Joiiriuil ofthe International A.s.sociation for Shell and Spatial Structures,
Vol. 53, No. !, March n. I7i 2012, pp. 31-38.

[3] MENGES A., Material Resourcefulness: Activating Material Information
in Computational Design. Architectural Design. Special Issue: Material
Compulation: Higher Integration in Morphogenetic Design. Vol. 82.
Issue 2, March/April 2012, pp. 34-43.

[4] MUTTONI A., TheArtofStructiwes, EPFL Press, Lausanne, 2011, pp.
74-76.

[5] PROBOTICS, Datareef http://theproboiics.t)logspol.cK, 2013.

[6] SANTl C., Charles Fames e la tecnica. Domus, No. 256, March 1951, pp.
11-14.

[7] SCMLAICH, J., SCIILAICH, M., Lightweight Structures, Lecture at MI T
- Massachusetts Institute ofTechnology, 4" October 2012.

[8] TIBBITS S., Sjet, http;//sjct.us/MlT_ORNAMENTAT10Nvl.html, 2013.



108


Extending the Functional and Formal
vocabulary of tensile membrane structures
through the interaction with bending-active
elements

Julian Lienhard', Sean Ahlquist', Achim Menges", Jan Knippers'
' Institute ofBuilding Structures and Strudwal Design (ITKE), University of
Stuttgart, Germany
7
" Institutefor computational Design (fCD), University ofStuttgart, Germany

Abstract

The use of elastically bent (bending-active) beam elements, as an intricate support
system integrated witli membrane surfaces, offers a great potential for new shapes
and highly efficient structural systems for mechanically pre-stressed membranes. In
tliis paper, such an integrated structural logic is being termed a textile hybrid. While
common camping tents have used this technique since the mid 1970's, very few
membrane structures are known that use bending-active support systems at a lai-ger
scale. Such integration of elastic beams with mechanically pre-stressed membranes
poses new challenges to the applied form-finding methodologies. This paper will
present     three      form-finding       techniques   which      can     be     applied;      physical
experimentation,  spring-based      computational   modelling   and    Finite-Element
simulation. The necessity of the interaction of these methods within a design process
will be discussed through a case study of a recently completed textile hybrid
structure. Set in the context of a historically protected site in western France, this
structure exhibits the ability to exert minimal force into the surrounding context by
means of shoilcutting the forces within the bending-active structure. Finally, this
project will also show how a repetition of the system logic at different scales enables
the creation of a multi-layer spatial structure and thereby the possibility of assigning
differentiated functions to the envelope.

Keywords: form-finding, bending-active, textile hybrid

 

109

 

I           Introduction

In the discussion of the structural systems discussed here, we use the terminology of
Heine Bngel [1] who describes membrane structures as fonn-activc, owing to their
inseparable interdependence of form and forcc. Following this notation, the term
"bending-active" was introduced by the authors to describe curved beam or surface
structures that derive their geometry from the elastic deformation of initially straight
or planar elements [2], hi order to guarantee sufficient load bearing capacity of a
structure that includes considerable residual stress, materials of high strength and
low bending stiflhess have to be chosen, in construction materials, the high limit
strain of fibrc-reinforced polymers (FRP) allow for the smallest bending radii. The
low stiflhess of glass-fibre reinforced polymers (GFRP) is usually considered a
disadvantage  in    construction,      but    when     using     these    unique     characteristics
advantageously for bending-active structures, new potentials in material driven
design may be unveiled. Expanding upon Engel's terminology, we specifically
classify the interdependence of form and force of mechanically pre-stressed
membranes and bending-active fibre-reinforced polymers as a textile hybrid.
The formal vocabulary of classical, mechanically and pneumatically pre-stressed,
membranes has arguably been exhausted. A limited set of basic shapes and their
combinations is generated Iroin four principal types of boundary conditions; edge
cables or stiff edges, high-points, arches and ridge/valley-cables. Adding the elastic
beam to this catalogue generates a vast extension to the possibilities of shape
generation. The clastic beam may become any of the above conditions, yet in a more
integral fashion where its shape is directly influenced by the membrane and vice
versa. In addition the elastic beam may bridge the gaps between the clearly
separated types as it may for example evolve from a curved boundary edge directly
into a ridge within the surface. In this hybrid approach of combining form- and
bending-active structures, a new scope of formal possibilities presents lt.self.
Although membranes belong to the class of lightweight constructions, they often
require significant secondary structures to anchor the system. Functionally, the
integration of elastic beams within a pre-stressed membrane surface offers the
possibility of short-cutting tension forces and creating free corner points. The system
is stabilized solely by the elastic beams which, in turn, are restrained by the
membrane surface. Owing to its ela.sticity, the beam partially adapts to the curvature
of the surface, but can carry compressive forces because it is restrained against
buckling by the membrane. On a secondary hierarchical level, the self-structuring
logic may repeat itself at smaller scales adding structural robustness to the primary
system and producing a multi-layer membrane for potential in advanced shading,
thermal and acoustic performance.
Some recent projects show the strategy of a textile hybrid in combining form- and
bending-active structures for short-cutting forces in classical membrane shapes.
Realized projects of architectural scale to mention are the Mobile Shelter Systems
f3], the Bat Sail [4] and the Umbrella Structure in Marrakech [5]. An extended
exploration of the formal capacities of textile hybrid structures, having not taken
place on an architectural scale, shall be presented in this paper.

 

2           Form-Finding

The form-llnding of membrane structures witli ben ding-active support systems
necessitates a simultaneous form-llnding of the form- and bcnding-active elements.
Independent of the exact simulation technique, including physical form-fmding
approaches, two principal strategies can be followed to achieve such a combined
equilibrium system:
a.) The process can be separated into first the form-tlnding of an elastically bent
beam structure and second form-llnding of the membrane attached to the beams.
Here the second form-finding step serves to generate an intricate equilibrium system
which is based on further deformations in the beam structure.
b.) Some scenarios also allow the simultaneous form-finding of the bending-active
beam elements and pre-stressed membrane elements. For numerical form-fmding the
bending of beam elements requires out of plane forces on the beam; this may be
achieved by eccentricities and/or three-dimensional input of the membrane-mesh.
While physical experimentation is vastly used, for example in the form-finding of
camping tents, numerical form-finding methods are still a matter of current scientific
research [6],

 

Physicalform-Jindinsf
Substantial for the exploration of bending-active structures is the fact that the
geometry of uniform singular elements is independent of its materiality and scale.
Comparative physical form-fmding experiments may therefore initially be canied
out at various scales, ranging from small scale study models to full scale prototypes.
However, stiffness is usLially largely overestimated by small scale models, resulting
in improper simulations of beam interaction and deformation. Such scale-dependent
conditions must be studied carefully by computational means, augmenting the
physical Ibrm-tlnding. The stilTnc-ss-dependent interaction of membrane pre-stress
and elastic beams can similarly only be approximated by physical form-finding
experiments. As an initial effort in design exploration of textile hybrids, physical
i'orm-llnding offers expedient means to approximate force active relationships and
define geometries for the interaction of pre-stressed membranes and configurations
of bending-active elements. Output from such experimentations serves to provide
topological data where more precise geometric and material descriptions can be
explored computationally.
The instant feedback of mechanical behaviour possible with the construction of a
physical model is indispensable in finding ways for shortcutting forces in an
intricate equilibrium system. The process, ollen unintuitive due to the complexity of
form-force relationships, furthermore enables exploration of diversity in form not
restricted by a delimiting catalog of types. Fig 1 shows a set of design models which
all feature fully shortcut textile hybrid systems. The studies offer prototypical
solutions of topological arrangements for the interconnection within networks of
bending-active elements in combination with form-active textiles.

 

111

 

Spring-httsed computational modelling
Spring-based methods have been developed to solve complex material behaviours
for both tensile and bending stillness. The programming of the methods utilize
particle systems where a particle represents a position and mass and a spring defines
an axial stitTncss whose calculation follows Hooke's Law of Elasticity [7], Particular
material behaviours are defined in specific spring topologies placing positional
constraints on variable (user-defined) networks of particle-springs. A hierarchy is
established where certain springs serve to provide tensile and bending stifTness
while other particle-springs define meshes representative of a physical geometry. In
this topological construct, the relationships within the condition of the textile hybrid
are relative and not explicitly expressive of select material descripfions.
The approximation of the mechanical behaviour for bending stiffness is captured in
particular topological arrangements of springs and the springs' properties of
stiffness. Three primary numerical methods have been established in Computer
Graphics: cross-over, vertex position and vertex normal [8]. The vertex normal
method has been expanded upon in structural engineering simulating three degrees
of freedom at each particle (node) in order to calculate the behaviour bending-active
beam elements [9], The diagrams below describe the different methods in their
arrangement of constraining parficle-spring topologies to the linear particle-spring
network which define the explicit beam condition.
Spring-based  methods  enable explorations of textile hybrids to advance in
complexity  and   specification in    their   topological  relationships via    relative
descriptions of force characteristics. Most importantly, housed within a modelling
environment, relationships can be actively altered with results being immediately
returned. Where the complexity of the form-active textile hybrid belies intuition,
iterative feedback through the computational environment elicits knowledge in
particular topological and behavioural manipulations. In a programmable modelling
environment, such specific manipulations can be encapsulated and embedded in
order to advance the potentials for geometric performance. Such was accomplished
with a modelling environment programmed in Processing (Java) by the authors,
utilized for the Ml project in developing articulated cell arrays configured to
produce diflerenliated .shading conditions within the textile hybrid envelope.

 

112

 

Finite Element Modelling
The necessity for simulation of large elastic delbrmations in order to form-tmd
bcnding-active structures poses no problem to modem nonlinear finite element
analysis. However, since Finite-Element programs do not serve well as a design
environment, the input data for the pre-processing of the simulation has to be
generated with either physical             form-finding or behaviour-based computational
modelling techniques akin to the procedures introduced above.
The    necessity  and    advantage   of    Finite-Element-Modelling  (FEM)    in    the
development of textile hybrids, in particular, lies in the possibility of a complete
mechanical description of the system. Provided that             form-finding solvers are
included in the software, the possibility of freely combining shell, beam, cable,
coupling and spring elements, enables FEM to simulate the e.\act physical properties
of the system in an uninterrupted mechanical description. These include: mechanical
material properties, asymmetrical and varying cross-sections, eccentricities coupling
and   interaction of individual  components, nonlinear  stress-stiffening effects,
nonlinear simulation of stresses and deflections under external loads (e.g. wind and
snow), patterning and compensation.
As a strategy for form-finding coupled bending-active systems in FEM, the authors
developed a new strategy using contracting cable elements to pull associated points
of an initially planar system into an elastically deformed configuration. These cable
elements work with a temporary reduction of clastic stiffness which enables large
deformations under constant pre-stress. This method was originally developed for
Ihc form-finding of tensile membrane structures using, for example, the transient or
modified stiffness method [10]. For the form-finding of coupled bending-active
systems, the great advantage is that the cables allow complete freedom to the
equilibrium paths that are followed during the deformation process. The pre-stress
that is independent of the change in element length also allows the simultaneous use
of several cable elements in the different positions of the system (See Fig 6)
Fig. 3 shows the form-finding of a membrane system with a bending-active arch
using general purpose FEM software Sofistik®. Here, coupling elements were used
to control the distance between the mechanically pre-stressed membrane elements
and elastically deformed Timoshenko beam elements. In a custom programmed
incremental procedure, pre-stress is assigned to the membrane surfaces while
contracting cable elements pull the ends of the beam towards the corner points of the
membrane.

113

3           Case Study Ml

The Textile Hybrid MI al La Tour do I'Architecte showcases the research on hybrid
form- and bending-active structure systems. The scientific goal of the project was
the   exploration  of   formal  and   functional  possibilities in    highly   integrated
equilibrium systems of bending-active elements and multi-dimensional form-active
membranes (termed in the authors' research as "Deep Surfaces"). The resulting
multi-layered membrane surfaces allowed not only for structural integration but also
served a functional integration by differentiating the geometry and orientation of the
membrane surfaces. The site selected for the design is a historical and structurally
sensitive tower in Monthoiron, France. The tower is based on a design by Leonardo
Da Vinci from the 16th century, which brought the owners to the idea of making the
tower usable for exhibitions. On the basis of a spatial program, a textile hybrid
system was developed where short-cutting of forces produced a minimization of the
loading on the tower. In the context of this project, the Ml was developed as a
representative pavilion.
For generative studies, the spring-based modelling environment, as described above
was    utilized   alongside   exhaustive  physical   fbrm-finding  experiments.  The
computational modelling allowed for complex topologies to be developed and
altered, quickly registering feedback from the prototypical physical studies (Fig 5).
In particular, this approach was utilized for the form-finding of the secondary textile
hybrid systein; a series of differentiated cells providing additional structure to the
primary envelope and variation to the illumination qualities of the space. As both a
design avenue and method for material specification, FEM was utilized. Here the
parameters of the complex equilibrium system were explored to determine the exact
geometry and evaluate the structural viability. Custom programmed methods inside
the   general   purpose  FE-Sotlware   Sofistik®  allowed   for   great   degrees   of
displacement to be calculated in order to form-find the beam positions. The beams
were initialized as straight elements and gradually deformed into interconnected
curved geometries, finally being reshaped by the inclusion of pre-stressed membrane
surfaces. The geometric data therein was determined initially by the physical form-
finding models in defining the lengths and association points on the rods for the
topology of FE beam elements (Fig 4). Given the unrolled geometry and connection
points of the rods it was possible to simulate the erection process and thereby the

114

 

residual stress in a finite element based form-finding prtieess.      By means of
automatic mesh generation, the membrane surfaces were added and a final form-
finding of the fully coupled textile hybrid was undertaken (see Fig. 6). This form
found structural analysis model allowed verification of the geometrical shape
including its residual stress, as well as analysing the deformations and stress levels
under external wind loads. Furthermore the form-found membrane surfaces could be
processed directly by the textile module of the software for patterning (Fig 7). Thus,
all three design models; the physical and both generative and specific simulation
techniques informed each other in this iterative design process.

 

The Ml structure is comprised of 110 meters of GFRP rods, 45m� of membrane
material covering an area of approx. 20m- and anchored to the ground with only 3
foundations resting against the existing stone structures which neighbor the lower, hi
total, the textile hybrid structure weighs approximately 60 kilograms (excluding
foundations), with a clear spans ranging from 6 to 8 meters. Fig. 8 shows the
finished structure, elaborating upon the hybrid nature of the system, where the
organization of bending-active beams and tensile surfaces creates moments of long

116


4          Conclusion

The project    Ml    demonstrates how "rethinking      lightweight structures'" can be
achi(;vcd when established structural types are overeomc ("or the exploration of
fundamentLiI material behaviours in their capacity lor balancing minimal material
use    with    mulli-llinctionality.    In    detail,   this    is    achieved     by    exploring    the
interdependence of lorm and force, designing the synchronlcity between form-active
textile membranes and bending-active fibre-reinrorced polymers lor a textile hybrid
system. This synthesis of material, lorm and force enables a complex structural
behaviour to be resolved into a single self-organizing equilibrium state that is both
robust yet continually elastic in its ability to rebound from varying external loads.
The ease study project Ml shows how textile hybrids may unfold a variegated
architectural space while at the same time being e.\tremely efhcieni with the
employed material resources and minimal contextual impact.

 

5           Acknowledgements

The research on bending-active structures is supported within the funding directive
BIONA by the German Federal Ministry of Bducation and Research,
Student Team of the Ml Project: Markus Bernhard, David Cappo, Celeste Clayton,
Oliver Kaertkemeyer, Hannah Kramer, Andreas Schoenbrunner
Funding of the Ml Project: DVA StifUing, The Serge Ferrari Group, Esmery Caron
Structures, "Studiengeld zuriick" University of Stuttgart

 

 

117


[1]    ENGEL, H.: Tragsysleme - Structure Systems. Ostfildem-Ruit 1999, pp.
41

[2]    KNIPPERS, J.; CREMERS, J.; GABLER, M.; LIENHARD, J.;
Construction Manualfor Polymers + Membranes, Institut flir
intemationale Architektur-Dokumentation. Miinchen: Edition Detail,
2011, pp. 134

[3]    BURFORD N., GENGNAGEL, C.; Mobile Shelters Systems  2 Case
Studies in Innovation-, Conference Proceedings I ASS Symposium 2004,
Shell and Spatial Structures from Models to Realization; Montpellier
France 2004

[4]    Off, R.: New trends on membrane and shell structures - examples of
hatsail and cushion-belt technologies. Structures and Architecture —
Cruz (Ed.), Taylor & Francis Group London, 2010

[5]    LIENHARD, J., KNIPPERS, J.: Permanent and convertible membrane
stnictures with intricate bending-active support systems. Proceedings of
the International I ASS Symposium, Seoul, Korea, 2012

[6]    ADRIANESSENS, S.: Feasibility Study ofMedium Span Spliced Spline
Stressed Membranes. International Journal of Space Structures Vol. 23
No. 4 2008, pp. 243-251

[7]    KILIAN, A., OCHSENDORF, J.: Particle Spring Systemsfor Structural
Form Finding, Journal of the international Association for Shell and
Spatial Structures Vol. 46, n. 147 2005.

[8]    VOLINO, P., MAGNENAT-THALMANN, N.: Simple Linear Bending
Stiffness in Particle Systems, Proceedings ibr Eurographics/ACM
SIGGRAPH Symposium on Computer Animation, Boston, USA, 2006.

[9]    ADRIANESSENS, S.M.L., BARNES M.R., Tensegrity spline beam and
grid shell structures. Engineering Structures 23,2001, pp 29-3

[10] F. HARTMANN, C. KATZ, Structural Analysis with Finite Elements,
Springer, Berlin, 2004, pp. 507

[11] UNTERER, K. Analysen zur Steifigkeit von Membrantragwerken mit
exzentrisch angehundenen biegeaktiven Tragelementen, Diploma Thesis
Kay Untcrer, Supervised by Dipl.-lng, Julian Lienhard, 2012

 

The Effect of Design Parameters of
Membrane Structures on the Costs

Mario Giraldo', Robert Wehdorn-Roithmayr�
 Karner Consulting ZT-GmbiI. Vienna, Aiistrici



2


Fonnjincler GmbH, Vienna, A ustria



Abstract

Architectural design is mainly driven by the available budget. Therefore it is
beneficial for designers to know, how to control the costs with the help of their
design. These basic decisions at the very beginning of a projoet are Ihe (bundations
for its (commercial and technical) success. At this stage the controllable parameters
are merely geometric; the location of the ligation points, the curvature ormembrane
and edges and the layout of the llxation points.

in the course of a master's thesis three independent design studies have been
performed on basis of a simple four-point sail. Different design parameters were
altered to analyze their efleet on the costs. Therefore every sail was run a full
predesign, considering the textile material, the primary and secondary steel structure
as well as the   foundations. The                found dimensions were the basis for cost
estimations.

The aim of these studies was to illustrate (he induenee of different design
parameters on the project costs. As a result a directly proportionate correlation of the
costs and the reaction forces was found. The smaller (e.g.) the curvature gets the
higher are the costs,

The results of this thesis shotdd point the direction and be the basis for further
investigations on this subject. In a first step we created an interactive tool integrated
into the "Formtlnder" software package - a design software for            form-active
structures.

Keywords: cost esliinalion, design parameters, form-active structures, membranes,
software tool

119

 

1          Introduction

The main dilTerence between designing rigid or form-active structures is the
approach to find the geometry required for a certain purpose, hi general one can say:
rigid structures are shaped; form-active structures are derived.
Conventional (rigid) structures are given a specific shape or geometry. Spans,
dimensions, and materials are chosen to be checked mathematically in relation to
given load cases. If the proves fail, either the geometry, sections, or materials have
to be changed. This iterative process continues until an acceptable result in ULS
(= Ultimate Limit Slate) and SLS (= Serviceability Limit State) is achieved.
The form-finding of tensile surface structures on the other hand starts with the
definition of the layout of an area to be covered as well as the arrangement of
fixation points and boundary conditions (such as stiff or elastic edges, or stress ratios
between  warp and  weft).  Within   these the membrane is   supposed  to   lind
equilibrium. One layout of boundaries allows only for one mathematical solution,
?neaning one particular membrane shape. Every alteration of the arrangement results
in a new variation of geometry. [2]
Therefore designers should be aware of the potential they have in hand to control the
(commercial) success of a membrane project. Right after the project idea the first
steps are the most important and have a major influence on the following design
process. In the beginning the architect has to deal with a lot of uncertainties. At first
the knowledge and the degree of detailing are very little and the risk for the project
not to get realized is very high. The more time passes the more knowledge is gained
and the risk of failure reduces.

2           Study

To visualize the relation between optimization of geometry and the resulting costs,
design studies have been performed on a four-point sail. Every single variation of
the base geometry ran through a complete ]5redesign of all main constructioti
components, such as membrane, edge cables, struts, guying cables, foundation.s, and
anchors. In a next step the individual project costs were estimated and the gained
values were visualized in figures for ftirther analyses.
The three independent studies included the following:
1.     Variation of the membrane curvature
2.     Variation of the edge cables curvature
3.     Variation of the inclination of the guying cables
2.1        Geometry
For easier understanding of the effects of altering the geometry the most simple roof
type was used - a four-point sail.

 

 

120

 

2.2        Study 01 - Variation of membrane curvature
The nieinbrane surface of the base roof is designed with an arch rise of 10%. In this
study the curvature of the membrane was altered from 3-20%. As an additional
precondition the minimum clearance of the sail at the highest point was set 3m. As a
result the height of the corners changes from model to model.

 

2.3         Study 02 - Variation of edge cable curvature
In this study the effects of dilTerent curvatures of the edge cables were analyzed.
Starting with the base roof, the considered range of the arch rise is 3-20% of the
fixation point distance. The clearance and the lengths of the struts remain the same
in all models.

 

121

 

2.4        Study 03  Variation of inclination of guy cables
On basis of tiie reactions oftlie standard roof, the angles of the guy cables against
the vortical were altered. The angle between the strut and the guy cables varies from
7.5-57.5°.

 

3          Study 01

To visualize the effects of altering the membrane curvature the following figure
gives an overview of the development of the bearing loads {red and green graphs)
and the forces in the edge cables (purple graph). To meet the precondition of
avoiding ponding, the prestress {blue graph) increases with the diminishing
curvature.



122

 

As generally known, a reduction of membrane curvalure causcs bigger internal
stresses and reaction forces (Figure 5). Taking the standard sail as a point of
reference, the results show, when the curvature increases from 10 to 20 percent
(A =10%), the reaction forces decrease only by 25 percent. Almost the satne
variation occurs when the curvature is reduced from 10 to 8 percent (A = 2%). At the

123

 

extreme end of the investigated range (curvature       3%), the reaction forces are 175
percent higher than at the base geometry,
As expected, the less the membrane is curved the higlier the total costs grow. The
unit costs change ahnost in parallel to the project costs.

4          Study 02

In Study 02 the altered design parameter is the edge cable curvature. Figure 7
suniiTiarizes the development ot the bearing loads (red and green graphs) and the
edge cable forces (purple graph). In contrary to Study 01, here the prestress (hliie

graph) rises with the increasing curvature.

 

124

 

Throughout Study 02 the location of the fixation points remains identical to the base
geotTietry. The most obvious effcct of reducing the edge cable curvature is a bigger
membrane surface. Furthermore (he edge cables become stressed more and
consequently the reaction forces increase. Having the same membrane curvature in
all models, bigger arch rises at the borders reduce the membrane stresses. As a result
the sail requires higher prctensioning the more the edges are curved.
The variation of the edge cable geometry has a major impact on the development of
the covered and the membrane surface area. While the progression is almost linear
over the whole range, the membrane surface of the biggest sail measures 2.3 times
the smallest.
Looking at the data of the structural calculations (Figure 7) the progression of the
forces eases at a curvature of about 12 percent and does not vary much until 20
percent. Although the total costs grow from high going to lower edge curvature
(caused by higher reactions forces), the development of the unit costs is misleading
(Figure 8). Dividing the costs (having a polynornial progression) by the surface area
(almost linear development) results in a U-shaped graph. First the unit costs follow
the total costs but at 12 percent curvature the chart comes to a turning point. From
this point on the unit costs grow again. The reason is the membrane surface
decreasing faster than the co.sts.
In reality this situation is more of a theoretical kind. The roof geometries of the last
models (with strong curved edges) do not seem reasonable from an architectural,
practical, and economical point of view. In reality strong curved edge cables will be
used for architectural reasons or if local stress reduction is required.

 

 

125


 5          Study 03

The following diagram indicates the progression of the strut forccs {blue graph)
respectively the forces in the guy cables {redgraph) and as a result the required size
of concrete foundations {green graph).

As only the strut and guy cables were considered in this study, Figure 9 only shows
the progression of the reaction forces and the corresponding size of the block
foundations. The strut is constantly inclined at 12.5°. Therefore the angle between
the strut and the guy cablcs varies trom 7.5° to 57.5°. As expccted, the smaller the
angle, the higher become the reaction forces of guys and struts. In the range from
57.5° to 37.5° the forces develop almost linear. While the investigated inclinations
augment in steps of 5°, in this range the internal forces grow by about 10 percent
from model to model. From 37.5° up to 7.5° the augmentation is more exponential.
The size of the block foundations evolves accordingly.
The effect of a variation of the enclosed angle between guy cables and struts is best
seen when related to the costs (Figure 10). The visualization shows a development
according to the progression of the forces. The single points on the left give (he
derived values for a support solution with restraint columns. It is interesting that the
costs of sails with very narrow strut-cable-arrangements top the ones of restraint
column solution. In this case architectural reasons may still be controlling. At an
enclosed angle of 7.5° the required steel profile is a CHS 168.3/6 {buckling stresses
authoritative) while the restraint column has to be a CHS 406,4/12 (bending stresses
authoritative). As explained in the presimiptions the more disadvantageous high
point (h = 4m) was dimensioned and taken for all fixation points. The conclusion is
that restraint cohnnns are only reasonable up to a certain column length.
fhe costs certainly mirror the progression of the forces.

6          Perspective / Outlook

The idea for the topic of this study is based on the fact that there are plenty of
dilTerent cost estimation (software) tools for conventional rigid structures on the
market. All of them needed a certain degree of detailing Ibr more or less reasonable
results. Yet, there is no such tool for form-active structures. Some design guides
give advice regarding geometry and detailing based on research and on practical
experience. Only the relation to the costs is not discusscd in any of tho.sc.
As mentioned in the introduction it is valuable to know about the etTiciency of a
structure (regarding the load transfer). However in reality the costs are the most
authoritative deaign pamnieter. Very often architecture is driven by the available
budget. Maximization of profits usually is the main aim. Concerning textile
architecture aiming for a cheap solution may not be an issue. Deciding for a
membrane roof already implies, an architectural solution is desired for the intended
purpose, meaning tensile structures are usually not the cheapest one. Anyhow,
regarding sustainable design a meaningful utilization of resources is to aspire at all
times,
This study should lay the basis for a series of investigations and studies on design
parameters and how the optimum costs can lie achieved by considerate amendments.
The intention is to extend this research to other types of geometries as well as to
other stages of the project. This thesis even leaves space for further investigations on
the four-point sail. Additional fixation points, rigid edges, use of other materials and
products, or special design elements (like loops) are additional design parameters
and their efTects can be interesting for everyone involved in membrane design.

127


The idea is to collect data and to publish the results in a real design guide. In schools
design is often seen as a combination of appearance and function of a product.
Reality shows that tlie commercial aspects, costs and return on investment, are at
least as important. This design guide should focus on all of these aspects. The wheel
will not be invented anew but established knowledge will be extended by and
associated with new aspects in design.
Furthermore the data gained should be used in a software tool that gives designers
an instant cost estimation of the current design. An interactive tool integrated into a
design-soiUvare for form-active structures, sueh as the Fonnpnder, would allow for
a significant simplification of the calculation process. Reduced complexity increases
the understanding of the cost-driving parameters. A first version of this software tool
which is not released yet visualizes these cost factors and can support designers to
keep their own design by providing a set of positive arguments to convince decision
makers of the design intention and the design concept.
We believe, comprehensive research on this topic can make a major difference. If
more and more people involved in membrane design understand the comple.x
relation between design and costs, the number of realized projects will increase
significantly.      Eventually this could encourage the whole industry and make
membrane architecture more common.

References

[ I ]    Gl RALDO, M, Design Parameters of Membrane Struelures and their
Influence on the Co.v/.v, master's thesis, TU Vienna, Vienna, 2012.

[2]    FORSTER, B,, MOI.LAERT. M. (eds.), European Design Guidefor
Tensile Surface Structures, TensiNet, Brussels, 2004.



128

 

Ultra-lightweight Space Frame Structures
Based on Minimal Path Computation

Moritz Fleischmann', Toni Kotnik�, Patrick Tcuffel�, Guntcr Henn'
' HENN Architects, Berlin.
 ETH Zurich.
■' Eindhoven University of Technology.

Abstract
Minimal surfaces, as visible in various natural systems, have great potential for
application in high-rise building design, due to their structural efficiency, overall
area minimization, and efficient material distribution. All of these factors contribute
to a sustainable architectural model and green building concept as they integrate
structure, form and force distribution in one coherent system.
In architecture, minimal surfaces have been predominantly realized as tension-active
surface structures, namely membranes or cable-nets [4]. Their application for
compression active-structures, other than shells, has not been as prominent. On the
other hand, many examples exist in nature. As natural systems are able to compute,
in essence, their physical form is the result of a constant feedback process.
In this research, we model the formations of soap lilm to derive a space frame
structtire based on minimal paths. The system is then applied to the design of a
500m tall prototypical steel structure.
The three-dimensional space frame structure was created using minimization
methods and shortest path algorithms. Together with horizontal slabs, it forms a
rigid system which can be seen as an alternative to conventional structural solutions
in high-rise building design. First simulations indicate that these systems can
achieve the same stifTriess with less material compared to traditional space frame
structures based on 90 degree angles. The proposed system is an ultra-light structure
design that allows for minimal material usage, thereby reducing the environmental
impact   significantly  without  compromising  the   structural  integrity  of more
conservative solutions.
Keywords: Minima! Path, High-rise, Structure, Minimal Surface, Lightweight

129


1  Introduction

In architecture, minimal surfaces have been predominantly realized as tension-active
surface structures, namely membranes or cable-nets. These structures are force-
active structures, meaning that they compute their forms under the application of an
external force.

In the physical world, soap film consumes the least amount of surface area given a
certain boundary. In plan, multiple bubbles form into hexagonal patterns. In space,
they intersect in a three-dimensional curve network. These "minimal paths" consist
of linear elements with the shortest overall length between all boundaries.
Here, we compute minimal path networks geometrically and look at their structural
potential as load-bearing structures for high-rise building design. We perform a
comparison between a traditional space frame based on 90 degree angle joints and
an alternative space frame structure based upon minimal path computation (Fig. 1).
Similar to foam bubble formations in nature, every node of the structure has three
elements that meet at a 120 degree angle. This is a great advantage for the detailing,
fabrication and assembly process, resulting in only one joint type for all connections
in the entire system.

l.I        Minimal Surfaces

In mathematics, a "minimal surface" is a surface that locally minimizes its area. This
is equivalent to having a mean curvature of zero. There arc numerous classes of
minimal surfaces, but ultimately they all link back to the "Plateau Problem".



130

 

The lerin "Plateau Problem" is coined after Joseph Plateau (1801-1883), who
experimented with soap tllm and wireframes to determine the shapes of minimal
surfaces.'

2          Minimal Paths

Minimal paths are a special form of open branching, consisting of linear elements
with the shortest overall length, which requires the least energy and material
consumption due to the inherent rigidness of the interlocking network. Frei Otto's
pioneering research on natural stnictures marked the beginning of analogue network
optimization. He distinguished three fundamental types of network configurations:
direct path networks, minimal path net\mrks and minimizing detour networks.

He linked the modelling of these networks to potential urban planning strategies and
other natural phenomena such as branching [2] [5] [6].
While we agree that there is great potential in the application of minimal path
networks at the urban scale, we would like to investigate their potential as structural
space frames. A limitation of the n�inimal path apparatus (Fig. 2), a physical soap
nim machine, was its ability to physically model 2-dimensional minimal paths only.
Therefore, the translation to (urban) plans during that time (1988) is evident. Today,
we can simulate these networks computationally and are no longer limited to two-
dimensional patterns only.


2.1         Coniputatioiiiil Modelling of Minimal Path Networks
The challenge to define a minimal network between points distributed freely in
space was  recently resolved                                                                       by appropriate energy minimization                       techniques,
computing the equilibrium configuration.

' The problem was first mathematically formulated in 1760 by the mathematician
Joseph-Louis Lagrange (1 7.'i6-1813).

131

 

This task of combinatorial optimization for finding the shortest connections between
points in space is known in mathematics as the Steiner tree problem [3],

In the Steiner tree problem, extra intermediate vertices and edges may be added to
the graph in order to reduce the length of the spanning tree (Fig. 3). Each of the new
points must have a degree of three and ail the angles between the edges incident to
such a point must be equal to 120 degrees.
This elegant, simple feature has some interesting repercussions for applications to
structural systems (iiere considered independently of scale or geometry, but rather
topologically). First of all, the valence of three on the nodal level guarantees that
three elements meet in one joint. There is no limitation to the amount of nodes, only
a few of which have to be fixed in position. l~he overall network geometry can be
three-dimensional, but, as only three elements meet at each node, each node has a
planar condition.

2.2        Modelling Minimal Paths using "Surface Evolver"

One program that enables various interactive studies on minimization methods is
Surface Evolver, developed by Ken Brakke fl].           This software evolves a surface
towards minimal energy by a gradient descent method, aiming to find a minimal
energy surface, or to model the process of evolution by mean curvature. For the
purpose of network optimization, we used the popping non-minimal vertex cones
method in Surface Evolver, incorporating the string model.
"The term string model means that the surface is one-dimensional. Edges are
defined in terms of their vertices and facets by a list of boundary edges. Facets are
not divided into triangles, and may have any number of edges. The edges of a facet
need not form a closed loop, for example, if the facet is partly bounded by a
constraint. A body is defined by associating one facet to it, and the volume of the

 

132

body      is     the    area    of     the    facet.     The    default   energy    is    edge    length"
[8],
In this mathematical model tension resides in the edges. The vertices of any "input
model" with a valance greater than three are popped. The process of "edge popping"
reduces the number of connections to a node (valence), by inserting new nodes (Fig.
4). The algorithm searches for pairs of edges making the least angle and pulls them
out a short distance with a new vertex. At the end, all vertices are joined. Since the
edge popping method takes a mesh as an input, it allows modelling and visualizing
three-dimensional networks.

3           Experiments

As the term "minimal path" suggests, the overall length of linear elements between a
given set of fixed nodes can be minimized using the previously described algorithm.
While this criterion, combined with the (act that all elements of this network meet at
120 degrees, carries a.stonishing potential for the application at the architectural
scale, we were specifically interested in the load-bearing potential and structural
stability of these networks. The tact that they can be found in numerous natural
systems and operate down to the inolccular and atomic levels implies that their
ability to balance and distribute forces might be equally efficient at larger scales.
In order to determine this, we set up a first set of experiments, where we compared
the structural performance of a cube consisting of linear beam elements to that of a
minimal path network. The eight fixed node locations at the corners served as input
for each experiment. Here we present the following:
1)     A cube and a minimal network (10 \ 10m) tinder self-load.
2)     A cube and a minimal network with slabs (35 x 35m) under self-load
3)    A cube and a minimal network with slabs (35 x 35m) under self-load and a
horizontal force.
3.1         Experiment series description & observations
For the experiments we set up a horizontal force equal to 1.500 N/m". All of the
cross-sections are equal for comparison reasons: a hollow circular section with 50cm
diameter and a wall thickness of 10cm. The concrete slab thickness, if used, is 20cm.
The material used in the simulation was slcel.

133

 

Most noteworthy besides the almost equal structural performance of the cube
compared to the minimal path network, is the drastic reduction in overall length of
linear beam elements. The material required to build a cube is almost 200% of that
of a minimal path network. For example, in the first experiment, the overall edge
length of the cube is 120m, whereas a minimal path network connecting the same
corner points only requires 61.96m.

4 Prototower

As part of the DRX 2012 a prototypical tower structure was developed as a 509m
tail space frame.

Each of the basic modules was computed by soap film minimization methods and
shortest path algorithms. The algorithm transforms a given boundary into a minimal
network, where at every node only three elements meet and their overall length is
the shortest possible.

135

 

The assembly of these components created a three-dimensional space frame, which
forms the main structure of the tower. Together with the concrete slabs, the
emergent network forms a stiff system.
The stability of the overall structure was validated through a series of FEA
simulations carried out in GSA. Numerous iterations of the three-dimensional
minimal path network were performed, especially with respect to the system's

ability to withstand a horizontal force at the tip, while acting under self-weight.

 

The final beam structure's total mass accumulated to 17.130 tons of steel for the
beam elements with an overall length of 6355m. The overall height reached 500m
and the tower's widest part measured 54m at the bottom. Three cross-sections were
used throughout the tower ranging from 2000-1000mm in diameter with an average
wall thickness of 100mm. The total area ofthe prototypical tower design summed up
to 78.500 square meters (this low number was a design decision, but can easily be
increased to more competitive ranges), resulting in a ratio of 218kg of structure/m�
of usable area in the entire tower (without the weight of the concrete slabs, including
the mass of the concrete, the ratio increases to an unrealistic 1.136 kg/m� because of
the very low area, which was a design decision).

136

 

Due to the slabs, which act as horizontal stitTeners, the total deformation at the tip of
the tower under an assumed horizontal force of 1500N/ m' amounted to only 2.5m.
This result is based upon calculations without a structural central core. This results
in a maximum freedom for the core design, interior program distribution as well as
potential ventilation systems throughout the tower.
Similar to the foam bubble formations in nature, every node of the structure has
three elements that meet at a 120 degree angle. This is a great advantage for the
detailing, fabrication and assembly process, resulting in only one joint type for all
connections.

5          Conclusion & Outlook

Minimal surfaces, as seen in various natural systems, have great potential for
application in structural design due to their inherent structural efficiency, overall
area minimization, and efficient material distribution.
The integration of structure, form and force in one system results in a reduction of
materials, while also achieving a sustainable building model that can be easily
adapted for futiLre programmatic changes.
While the translation of minimal surface into structural systems, such as tents and
membrane roofs, has been proven successfully, the application of three-dimensional
minimal path networks to building structures, such as space frames, remains
virtually unexplored. The reason for this is unclear, especially as the simplicity of
these networks on the nodal level (120 degrees at each vertex) is intriguing from a
fabrication point of view. The spatial qualities - as with any edge-based nets -
remain to be further explored.
Minimal paths exist in nature at various scales. They usually emerge as patterns
linked to structural performance (honeycomb, soap bubbles, films, etc.). Therefore,
not only their material-saving potential, but also their capacity as load-bearing
structures should be further explored.
The proposed system based on three-dimensional minimal paths is an ultra-light
design which allows for minimal material usage, reducing the environmental impact
significantly without compromising the structural integrity. Together with horizontal
slabs, this rigid system can be seen as an alternative to conventional structural
solutions in high-rise building design. First simulations indicate that these systems
can achieve the same stillness with less material compared to space ft�ame structures
based on 90 degree angles, while maintaining a similar ease for assembly,
While further tests have to be carried out in order to prove the structural capacity in
large complex structural systems with various materials and load cases (earthquake,
wind, etc.), the application of three-dimension minimal path    for space frame
structures seems viable.



137


6           Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the researchers Agata Kycia (HENN), Danae Poiyviou
(TEUFFEL ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS) & Anna Wavvrzinek {Mathematical
Geometry Processing, Prof K., Polthier, FU Berlin) who together developed the
concept, tools & tower project as part of the Design Research Exchange 2012 on
"Minimal Surfacc High-rise Stnicturcs" hosted by HENN Architects [7],



138

 

Refercnccs

[IJ     BRAKKH, K., The Surface Evoiver. Experimental Mathematics, Vol. 1,
no. 2, 1992, pp. 141-165.

[2]    GASS, S., Experiments: Form, Force, Mass J (!L 25), Karl Kramer
Verlag, Stuttgart, 1991.

[3]    HWANG, F. K., RICHARDS, D. S., WINTER, P., The Sieiner Tree
Problem (Annals of Discrete Mathematics 53), Elsevier Science Ltd,
Amsterdam, 1992,

[4]    OTTO, P., RASCH, B., Finding Form- Towards an architecture ofthe
minimal, Edition Axei Menges, Stuttgart, 2001.

[5]    OTTO, F., Occupying and Connecting: Thoughts on Territories and
Spheres ofInfluence with Particular Reference to Human Settlement,
Edition Axel Mengcs, Stuttgart, 2008.

[6J    OTTO, F., Verzweigungen (Konzepte SFB 230 - Hand 46), Stuttgart
University, Stuttgart, 1995.

[7]    IIENN, Design Research Exchange, http://www,henn.com/rescarch/drx

[8]    BRAKKE, K., Surface Evoiver Manual,
http://www.susqu.edU/brakke/cvolver/html/modei.htm#string model


139

 

Membrane restrained girder

Holger Alpcrmann', Christoph Gcngnagel'
' Univenity ofihe Arts Berlin

Abstract

The membrane-restrained girder is a new hybrid, structural element, in which the
membrane has an indispensable etTect on structural behaviour. The girder presented
in this paper has the geometry of a three-chord truss. A flat membrane connects the
chords with each other and restrains them. The membrane between the upper chords
raises the buckling load decisively, the membranes on the side brace the fields
between the spreaders against deformations under asymmetrical loads.

Keywords: membrane restrained, hybrid structure, nonlinear, FE-Model, Detail-
Connection

1           Introduction

The membrane restrained girder has the same geometry as a three-chord truss. All
chords end in a single point at either end where they are supported. The upper chord
consists of two profiles, between which a membrane is stretched. The bottom chord
is compri.sed of a cable. Similar to a suspended girder, the cable is connected with
the upper chords by 8 spreaders on each side. Additionally, the upper chord and the
cable are connected by a continuous membrane.
The membrane restrained girder is used as a single span girder. Just as in the case of
a su.spended girder, the cable is subject to tension. The tensile forces of the cable arc
transferred at each end of the girder and the upper chord functions like a planar
membrane restrained column [1]: the two curved profiles of the upper chord deform
outward under the horizontal load of the trusses. The membrane stretched between
the profiles prevents this deformation. The membrane couples the two profiles, so
that they cannot buckle individually. The buckling load of the upper chord
consisting of both profiles and the membrane is considerably higher than that of the
two individual profiles added together.

 

141



Figure I. Model ofmemhrcme restrained girder.

If the geometry of the cable is aHfine lo the applied loads, the loads are primarily
transferred by the cable. The profiles of the upper chord act like continuous beams,
in which the spreaders perform as supports. Asymmetrical loads are transferred as
by trussed girders: the membrane reinforces the fields between a upper chord, the
cable and two of the spreaders. Diagonal tensile forces develop accordingly within
the membrane. By using membranes instead of cables, the nuinber of nodes is
mari<edly reduced.

2          Numerical Model

The membrane restrained girder was numerically evaluated with the FE-software of
Sofistik. The maximum width of the upper chord is determined to         0,5 m as is the
height of the girder in its middle. The profiles selected for the upper chord - which is
constantly curved - are square, hollow aluminum profiles measuring 25 mm x 2,5
mm. The two compression chords come together in a single point. The compression
chords are modelled as beam elements. The connection of the two beams with each
other is hinged except for torsion-moments.
A parabola was used to create the geometry of the cable, so that equally distributed
loads can be taken on solely by the cable. The intersection of the parabola with the
spreaders determines the location of the nodes of the polygonal cable. The cable is
modelled as cable taking only tension-forces. Each side has 8 spreaders being 0,65
tn apart from one another. In the FE-Model the spreaders are modelled as bars. This
means, that the connection of the spreaders to the upper chord and to the cable are
hinged.



142

 

The membrane is modelled with two-dimensional, quadrangular elements, whieh
only take tension               forces.                                                     The specific orthotropic material                                    properties of the
membrane are considered in the FE-elements according to Mtinsch-Reinhardt. I'he
E-modultis of the membrane was choseti 600 kN/m for both thread directions and
the shear modulus 40 kN/m. The membrane orientation is turned on all sides 45° to
the axis of the girder. The cable has an R-modtilus of 130000 N/mm� and is round
with a diameter of 6 mm.
Two dilTerent load cases were calculated. In the first (symmetric) load case, a
constant, vertical line load was placed on both profiles of the upper chord and in the
second (as>anmclric) load case both profiles were subjected to loads spanning from
the left support to the middle of the girder.
The buckling of the upper chord represents a possible failure of the girder. To
consider buckling in the numerical model, imperfections are applied to the upper
chord. The imperfection of the upper chord is equal to the smallest scaled eigenform
under horizontal loads. The eigenform is scaled, so that the maximum imperfection
comes to 15 mm,

 

3          Structural Behaviour

The structural behaviour of" the imperfect girder is evaluated until the tnaximum
load-bearing capacity is reached. In figure 4, the load-deflection curves tor load
cases 1 and 2 are shown. The line load is integrated to compare both load cases. The

143

maximum vertical deformation of the girder appears in load case 1 at point 1 and in
load case 2 at point 2. The buckling of the upper chord is evaluated by the horizontal
displacement of the upper chord at point 3.
Tlie load-dellection curve for the vertical deformation is close to linear in both load
cases. In contrast, the stiffness of the girder differs significantly in both cases; The
load-dcflection curve is much steeper in the first case than in the second. In the first
load case, the load is affme to the geometry of the cabic, and so the loads are
transferred almost exclusively by the cable to the supports. In the second load case,
the system acts like a trussed girder. The total stiiThess is therefore not only
dependent on the cable, but also on the bending-stilThess of the upper chord and the
stiffness of the membrane acting like a diagonal brace in the fields.
The load-bearing capacity is determined by the outward displacement of the upper
chord, which under vertical loads buckles outwards when the buckling load has been
reached. Due to the applied imperfections, the load deflection curve for point 3 is
logarithmic and approaches the load-bearing capacity. The load-bearing capacity is
higher in load case 1 than in load case 2

If the lateral membranes are removed, this will have almost no effect on the load-
deflection behaviour or the load-bearing capacity in load case 1. In load case 2, the
diagonal bracing provided by the lateral membranes would be missing, in which

144

 

case the asymmetrical load would only bo transferred by the cable and the bending
stitTness of the upper chord. The girder does not act as a trussed girder anymore.
Because of this, the deformations are significantly higher and the load-bearing
capacity significanlly lower.
If the lop membrane is removed, the girder will iosc its concept. The compressive
slilVncss of the upper chord drops dramatically to the sum of two single profiles
compared to coupled profiles. The stiffness of the upper chord is much to small in
relation to the stiffness of the cable, so the concept of having a truss-like structure
does not work anymore. These two comparisons show, that the membrane as a load-
bearing element is indispensable for the construction,
The width and height of the girder should be at least 10% of its span. If the two
upper chords are                                 loaded different,                torsion     moments appear.                                    Under torsional
naoments, the load-bearing capacity of'the girder is reduced. Torsional moments can,
however, be prevented by coupling the girder with other girders, eletnents or
supports. The torsional stiffness of one girder can be improved by rigid (instead of
hinged) connections of the upper chords with each other or with additional spreaders
between the two top chords [1].

4          Membrane Forces

In load case 1, the highest principle tensile forccs in the top membrane appear at the
ends of the girder. The principle forces occur only in one direction, which is turned
45° to the axis of the girder. At the euds of the girder, the applied imperfections are
the highest and it is here that the highest horizontal displacement occurs. Therefore,
the stitTening effect of the membrane - and the tensile forces within the membrane -
are the highest at this point. In the middle area, the forces in the membrane are
relatively small. The membrane forces are equal in both directions and smaller than
at the ends of the girder. The maximum membrane force at the ends of the girder are
as high as 1 kN/m under a load of 4 kN and as high as 2,3 kN/m under a load of 8
kN.
The membrane forces in both lateral membranes are almost identical, being very
small and without any specihc orientation. As shown in chapter 3, the lateral
membranes has little to no effect on the load-bearing behaviour of the girder in load
case 1.
principle membrane forces, load case 1, 4 kN.

145

 

In load case 2, similarly oriented membrane forces occur in the top membrane as in
load case 1. The membrane forces at the unloaded end decline sharply. At the loaded
end, the membrane forces are as high as 1,6 kN/m under a load of 4 kN and as high
as 4 kN/m under a load of 8 kN.
In the lateral membranes, under asymmetrical loads the membrane forces act as
diagonal tensile forces in the individual fields. Thus, the highest forces occur at the
corner joints, despite the fact that the entire membrane in the field contributes to the
overall diagonal stiffness. Almost no membrane forces are present in the outermost
triangular fields, as their form alone creates enough stiffness. The membrane forces
are 2,5 kN/m under a load of 4 kN and up to 6 kN/m under a load of 8 kN.

Tlie principle membrane forces were shown to be primarily diagonal in the top
membrane as well as in the lateral. Due to this fact, the orientation of the warp and
weft direction of the membrane is turned 45°. If the orientation of the membrane is
kept by 0°, the defonnations of the girder will increase.

5          Influence of Detail Connection

The membrane forces are transferred to the chords. The membrane forces at the
chords can be divided in forces tangential to and those radial to the edge. If the
membrane edge is clamped, tangential and radial forces can be transferred from the
membrane into the chords. In detail connections, where the membrane edge can
slide in tangential direction as for example in keder trails, only radial membrane
forces can be transferred. The influence these two principle detail connections have
on the overall system is analysed in two separate models.
Clamped connections can take on radial and tangential membrane forces, to which
the results in chapters 2-4 are testament. "Free-to-slide" connections can only take
on radial forces. Friction, such as that which occurs in a keder trail, are neglected.
The connections of the top and lateral membranes are independent of one another.
In a comparison between clamped and free-to-slide connections for the lateral
membrane in load case 1, there is almost no change to the load-bearing behaviour of
the system. This is not surprising, as the influence of the lateral membrane on the

146

 

Load-beai ing behaviour of the girder under load case 1 was already shown to be
negligible in chapters 3 and 4. hi load case 2, by contrast, a frcc-to-siide connection
produces a lower load-bearing capacity and twicc as much deformation.
If the upper connection of the membrane is detlned free-to-slide, the load-bearing
capacity will be reduced to 50% in load case 1 and to 22% in load case 2. The load-
bearing capacity of the upper chord declines, as diagonal membrane forces (chapter
4) can only be taken on to a certain degree. The load-deflections curves for clamped
and free-to-move connections have the same slope, which shows that the upper
connection has no influence on the stiffness.

The influence of the connections on the structural behaviour is great. The connection
of the top membrane is of more importance, as it determines the load-bearing
capacity of the girder. A free-to-slide connection greatly reduces the load-bearing
capacity. The lateral membrane connections, on the other hand, only play a role
when the girder is loaded asymmetrically. They only slightly influence the load-
bearing capacity but have a groat inilucncc on the vertical deformations.
The connections between the membrane and the chords should be clamped. A
continuous and flxed connection between the membrane and the cable is, however,
quite costly. This connection would be possible with textile belts, but their stifftiess

147

 

is too low. If steel cables are used for the lower chord, the individual clamps can
selectively produce a clamped connection. In the numerical model the coupling of
the tangential forces between the metnbrane and the cable was defined only in the
joints of the spreaders, between which the connection between the membrane and
the cable remains frec-to-slide. The load-bearing capacity and the stiffness are
almost identical to the model using a continuous clamped connection.

6          Conclusion

The membrane restrained girder is a new and efficient hybrid structure. The
membrane is introduced as an    indispensable load-bearing element decisively
influencing the load-bearing capacity and the .stitTncss of the girder. The top
membrane reinforces both profiles of the upper chord, so that they deflect
collectively and not individually. This raises the buckling load of the upper chord
significantly, while the lateral membranes restrain the girder under asjinmetrical
loads. The connection of the membrane and the chords has a large influence on the
load-bearing capacity and should be constructed so that radial and tangential
membrane forccs can be transferred to the chords.

References

[1]     ALPERMANN, H., GENGNAGEL, C., Membranversteifler Trciger,
Stahlbau 81, pp.373-378, 2012.
[2]     ALPERMANN, U., GENGNAGEL, C., Membranversteifte Bo�enlragwerke,
Stahlbau 78, pp. 531-536, 2009.
[3]     ALPERMANN, H., GENGNAGEL, C., Hybfid membrane structures, lASS
Symposium 2010-Spatial Structures Temporary and Permanent, pp. 2189-
2196, 2010.
[4]     LUCHSINGER, R., PEDRETTI, A., STEINGRUBBER, P., PEDRETTI, M.,
The new structural concept Tensairit)>: Basic principles. In: Progress in
structural engineering, mechanics and computations. London; A.A. Balkenna
Publishers, 2004.
[5]     ALPERMANN, 11., GENGNAGEL, C., Membrane restrained columns,
Structural Membranes, Proceedings of the V International Conference on
Textile Composites and Inflatable Structures, Barcelona, 2011.



148

 

Form finding and structural analysis for
hybrid structures in the design process

Bencdikt Philipp', Falko Dieringer'" Alexander Michalski", Roland
Wuchner', Kai-Uwe Blctzinger'
' Chair ofStmctwa! Analysis, Tecluiisclie Universitdt Miinchen, Germany-
' SL-Rasch GmhH, Leinjelden-Echlerdingen, Germany.

Abstract

In the design of membrane structures, the integration ofbending-active eleineiits like
beams allows for interesting new designs. In classical form finding the stress-state is
prescribed and equilibrium will be satisfied in the form found geometry. In contrast,
the .stress-state of bending-active elements depends on their deformation. The
opposed behaviour of these two types of members leads to the term "hybrid
structures". The simulation of these hybrid structures will be presented in this paper.

The necessary equations for incorporating elastic members in the form finding and
analysis of membrane structures are presented, methods of applying the results of
form finding to the structural analysis are discussed. The necessity of incorporating
elastic members fi-oni the beginning of the design process is demonstrated with
small-scale examples. Finally the simulation of a 29m umbrella that's part of an on¬
going research project is used to demonstrate the possibilities and limits of accurate
simulation of membrane structures with integrated bending-active elements.

Keywords: tensile structures; membrane; hybrid structures; bending-active;farm
finding; wide-span stmctures.



149

 


Form finding and structural analysis for
hybrid structures in tlie design process

Benedikt Philipp', Falko Dieringer''Alexander Michalskr, Roland
Wiichncr', Kai-Uwe Bletzingcr'
' Chair ofStructural Analysis, Technische Universitcit hdiinchen, Germany.
■>
' SL-Rasch GmbH, Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Germany.

Abstract

In the design of membrane structures, the integration ofbending-active elements like
beams allows for interesting new designs. In classical form finding the stress-state is
prescribed and equilibrium will be satisfied in the form found geometry. In contrast,
the stress-state of bending-active elements depends on their deformation. The
opposed behaviour of these two t>pes of members leads to the term "hybrid
structures". The simulation of these hybrid structures will be presented in this paper.

The necessary equations for incorporating clastic members in the form Imding and
analysis of membrane structures are presented, methods of applying the results of
form finding to the structural analysis arc discussed. The necessity of incorporating
elastic members from the beginning of the design proccss is demonstrated with
small-scale examples. Finally the simulation of a 29m umbrella that's part of an on¬
going research project is used to demonstrate the possibilities and limits of accurate
simulation of membrane structures with integrated bending-active elements,

Keywords: tensile structures; membrane; hybrid structures; bending-active; form
finding; wide-span structures.



149

 

 

1 Introduction and motivation



In the design of membrane structures, the integration of bencling-active elements like
beams allows for interesting new designs [12], Though computation capacities and
the available software have made important steps, it is still very common to treat
form finding separately with fixed boundaries, before introducing bending-active
elements during the follow-up structural analysis. As membrane structures are
mechanically motivated shapes, this barrier between form finding and structural
analysis contradicts the general design process. Furthermore this splitting has
important draw-backs, an early integration of all members could help to rehably
simulate the structural behaviour and thus open the way to new designs that take
advantage of the contributions of beam elements to the structure's behaviour.
Classical form finding methods determine the shape that provides a state of
equilibrium for the proscribed stress-state in the form found members. In contrast,
bending-active elements as non-form found members change their internal stress-
state during the form finding process. The opposed behaviour of these two types of
members leads to the term "hybrid structures". Incorporating these different ways of
structural behaviours in one single design and analysis process will help to obtain
more reliable simulation results, especially when it comes to dynamic analysis.

2           Form finding and transfer to structural analysis

Form finding is a very special application of the non-linear structural analysis.
While in classical structural analysis the stress state is determined based on the load-
dependent displacements, starting with an initial geometry, in form finding problems
this procedure is inverted: the desired stress state {e.g. the pre-stress of the
membrane or cable net) is applied and the geometry that brings this state into
equilibrium is determined (cf fig. 1) [I-l I].

The form finding problem can be formulated based on the principle of virtual work,
here noted in the reference configuration with the domain

 

150

(1) where S is the second Piola-Kirchlioff stress tensor, 6K the virtual Green-Lagrange
strain tensor, p the vector of external loads and 8u are the virtual displacements. In
general the stress tensor S is composed of two parts,      from elastic deformation and
So from pre-stress: 8 = 8�.,        Equation (I) can be rewritten as follows:

where R =        -R„, is the vector of unbalanced forces. Making use of the
Newton-Raphson algorithm, this problem can be solved with the linearization of R,
introducing  the   tangential   stiffness matrix   K.    Supposing   conservative  and
deformation-independent loading the stiffness matrix can be derived as follows:

For the case of pure form finding (i.e. no elastic stresses occur), where the pre-
stresses are independent of the deformation process, equation (3) is simplified to:

The stresses Si depending on the elastic deformation process are a product of the
material tensor C and the elastic strain tensor E, S., = C: E. Thus elastic members
in the form finding process motivate a modification of the stiffness, whereas they arc
already incorporated in the definition of the residual forces R given above:

As only the elastic stresses depend on the deformation, equation (5) can finally be

rewritten

Now we can identify the different influences: While the form found members
(classically membranes and cables) only make use of their geometric stiffness

151

The elastic members (e.g. beam-supports) need their complete non-linear stilTiiess
matrix K = K""' + K®"' to fulfil equilibrium.

As form iniding methodology, the Updated Reference Strategy (URS) is used. As
the original problem is based in the current configuration, it can be written in
analogy to equation {I) as

-SW = -(6VV,„ + 6W„,,) = j(o : 5c)dv- |(p■ 5u)dv =                         = 0                       (7)
n                     a

where the integration domain LI now is the current volume, o the Cauchy stress
tensor and 6e the virtual Euler-Almansi strains. In URS the form finding problem is
set up as a combination of the original problem in the current configuration
(equation (7)) and the modified problem in the reference configuration (equation
(1)), introducing a blending factor X, the so-called homotopy factor [2,3,8,9]:

= -(X                 + (l -?.).8W,+(l -X).cWj                                (8)

In URS the reference configuration of the fonn found members is updated after each
pseudo-time step (form finding step) whereas the elastic members keep track of the
deformation process w.r.t. the original reference configuration. The resulting
displacement field ultimately leads to the elastic stresses in the non-form found
members.
As an example for the application of the two discussed types of members in one
structure, form found and elastic elements, a tent-like structure with a supporting
beam could be taken (cf fig. 2).

When there are only form found members, the result of the form finding analysis is
the geometry, which fulfils equilibrium for the given pre-stress state. Basically, only
updated nodal coordinates have to be stored from the form finding, as the
application of the pre-stress in a follow-up structural analysis will recreate the final
state of the form finding.

 

152

 

For the case of non-form found elastic members included in form found structures,
the transition from form finding to structural analysis has to be adapted, hi order to
keep track of the internal stress state of the clastic members, the elastic deformation
has to be stored. In general, there are two major possibilities to do this [11]: (i) by
keeping track of the deformation process by means of pre-described displacements
or (ii) by storing and applying the internal stress-state.
Mechanically, these approache.s are very close to each other: in further analyses the
internal stress-state will directly be part of the stress tensor S, just like pre-stress. In
contrast the use of pre-described displacements leads to strains E, which produce
stresses via the material law.
Though they describe the same behaviour, these approaches show important
differences concerning their ftirther handling. The first method {"ImtDisp") has the
advantage that only information at the nodes has to be stored from the form finding
analysis. On the other hand, an important difference in modelling occurs: Whereas
for the form found members, the "new" geometry is set, the non-form found
memfiers keep their old reference (cf fig. 3). This means that members, which are
attached to each other, have to be separated (i.e. their common nodes have to
doubled) and their nodes have to be coupled (more precisely: their degrees of
freedom). As discussed above (cf equation (8)), the nodes of the form found
memliers are updated at each form llnding step, the elastic members keep track of
the deformation w.r.t. their "original" nodes (cf fig. 3).

For the second method {"InitStress"), this problem doesn't occur, as the structure's
topology isn't modified, attached members stay attached. Now the internal stress-
state is stored (for the case of beam members one could also store the internal
resultant forces) and applied at the lieginning of the structural analysis. Thus
different types of information are transferred from the form finding, the updated
coordinates and the stored ela.stic stre.sses. Ultimately this leads to the same internal
stresses at the beginning of the structural analysis as well as to the same behaviour
for any fiarther calculations (cf fig. 4).



153


Obviously, neglecting tiie deformation process the structure has been subjected to
during the form finding, would lead to fiirther "initial" deformation even without
external loading. Without this information, the equilibrium is no longer satisfied, as
the elastic members can't contribute to it. Further deformation will be necessary in
order to find a new state of equilibrium.

3           Influence of clastic members on the structural analysis

As a first application example, we would like to introduce a "blossom"-shaped
structure. This fictive structure consists of form found and of purely elastic
members. It is supported at the bottom and at the top, in between cables and beams
hold (he membrane in place.

Here a form finding analysis as well as static and dynamic analysis has been
performed. A classical approach would have been to take the - relatively stiff -
beams as fixed supports during form finding and applying them from the structural
analysis on. Nevertheless it's obvious that doing so would introduce an initial
deformation at the beginning of the structural analysis, necessary to reinstate
equilibrium. Tliis deformation leads to a decrease of the level of pre-stress in the
membrane, which on the other hand would influence the structure's behaviour, hi
Figure 6 the different stress levels at the beginning of the structural analysis are
represented.

 

 

154


This change of the stress level underlines the influence of incorporating the
deformation from the form finding process at the beginning of a follow-up analysis.
Especially for dynamic analysis this can be decisive, as for membrane structures the
dynamic behaviour is strongly dependent on their pre-stress level.

4          Application to wide-span umbrella structures

The application to wide-span umbrella structures shall highlight the importance of
incorporating bending-active elements throughout the whole design and analysis
process. The presented umbrella has been built multiple times up to now. It's part of
an on-going research program [13-16] that includes various simulations of the
structural      behaviour      as     well     as     CFD-calculations   and     in-situ    real-scale
measurements of wind impact on the umbrella and of its structural response.

This umbrella is a foldable structure that spans 29m when unfolded (cf fig. 7). The
membrane is pre-stressed through radial belts, which are fixed at the steel arms. As
the pre-stress state in opened position is isotropic, the membrane is a minimal
surface. The simulation of the structure is performed with the use of membrane,
cable and beam elements, which are derived from the really built umbrella.

155

 

Throughout the Ibrm finding, the beams are treated as elastic elements; the stresses
in the elastic members are stored and applied as starting configuration for the further
analysis  (cf.    paragraph  2,    method   "InilStress").         Here,   amongst   others  an
eigenfrequency analysis as well as the dynamic simulation of wind load on the
structure has been performed (cf. fig. 8).

For   the   dynamic  analysis under   wind   load,  time   series    from  wind   tunnel
measurements for 32 different loading areas are used (cf flg.8). As main point of the
evaluation, the mast foot bending moment is chosen, as it allows comparing
different simulations and measurements in one single design-deciding value. This
value is also used in order to compare the performed simulations to other results. In
this special case, validation with other software environments as well as with
tncasured data is possible, which allows for detailed comparisons (cf fig. 9).

The perlbrmed calculations and analysis (form finding, static and dynamic analysis)
of the umbrella in combination with the measurements and results of previous
analyses shall help to improve the simulation of light-weight structures under wind-
load. Ultimately these evaluations lead the way towards the establishment of a
numerical wind-tunnel. Therefore, a development towards reliable CFD simulations
as well as to Fluid-Structure Interaction is part of the mentioned on-going research
project [13-17],

156

 

5          Conclusions

The importance of incorporating elastic members in ail steps of the design and
analysis of tensile structures has been shown. The necessary modifications to known
procedures especially in form llndiiig have been developed. The mentioned methods
have been applied to membrane structures of dilTerent size and comple.xity. Finally,
an application of the presented approach was given for a real-scale wide-span
umbrella structure. The performed simulations proof the applicability and shall
encourage taking one more step towards close-to-reality simulations.

References

[1]    F. Otto, B. Rasch: Finding Form. Deutscher Werkbund Bayern. Edition
A. Menges, 1995.

[2]    K.-U. Bletzinger, E. Ramm: A general finite element approach to the
form finding oftensile structures by the updated reference slraleg\\
International Journal of Space Structures, 14 (1999), pp. 131-146.

[3]    K.-U. Bletzinger, E. Ramm: Stnicturul optimization andform finding of
light weight structnres. Computers and Structures, 79 (2001), pp. 2053-
2062

[4]    M. Barnes; Form finding and analysis oftension structures by dynamic
relaxation. International Journal of Space Structures, 14 (1999), pp. 89-
104.

[5]    D. S. Wakefield: Engineering analysis oftension structures: theoiy and
practice. Engineering Structures, 21(8) (1999), pp. 680-690.

[6]    H.-J. Schek: Theforce density methodforform finding and
computations ofgeneral networks. Computer Methods in Applied
Mechanics and Engineering, 3 (1974), pp. 115-134.

[7]    K. Linkwitz: Formfincling hy the Direct yipproach and pertinent
strategies for the conceptual design ofprestressed and hanging
structures. International Journal of Space Structures, 14 (1999). pp. 73-
88.

[8]    J. Linhard; Numerisch-mechanische Betrachtungdes Entwurfsprozesses
von Membrantragwerken. PhD thesis, Lehrstuhl ftir Statik. Technische
Universitat Miinchen, 2009.

[9]    J. Linhard. K.-U. Bletzinger: "'/'racing the Equilibrium "  Recent
Advances in Numerical Form Finding. International Journal of Space
Structures, 25 (2010), pp. 107-116.

 

157


[lOJ F. Dieringer, K.-U. Bletzinger, R. Wuchner; Practical advances in
numericalformfinding and cutting pattern generationfor membrane
structures. Journal of the international association for shell and spatial
structures, 53 (2012), pp. 147-156.

[11] K.-U. Bletzinger, F. Dieringer, B. Phiiipp; Numerische Methoden fur
Formfmdung, Simulation und Zuschnitt von Memhrantragwerken.
Essener Membranbausyniposium 2012.

[12] J. Lienhard, J. Knippcrs; Permanent and convertible membrane
structures with intricate heading-active support systems. Proceedings of
the International lASS Symposium Seoul, 2012.

[13] A. Michalski: Simulation leichter Fldchentragwerke in einer numerisch
generierten almosphdrisclien Grenzschicht. PhD thesis, Lehrstuhl fiir
Statik, Technische Universitat Miinchen, 2009.

[14] A. Michalski, E. Haug, R. Wuchner, K.-U. Bletzinger; Validation ofa
virtual design methodology'for the structural analysis ofmembrane
structures subjected to wind. Bauingenieur, 86 (2011), pp. 129-141.

[15] A. Michalski, P.D. Kerniel, E. Haug, R. Lohner, R. Wuchner, K.-U.
Bletzinger; Validation of the computationalfltud-structure interaction
simulation at real-scale tests ofaflexible 29 m umbrella in natural wind
flow. Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics, 99
(2011), pp. 400�13.

[16] A. Degro; Simulation of wide-span umbrella structures under transient
wind loads. Master's thesis, Lehrstuhl tiir Statik, Technische Universitat
Miinchen, 2012.

[17] R. Fisch, J. Franke, R. WUchner, K.-U. Bletzinger; Towards the
establishment ofa numerical wind tunnel. Forschungskolloquium
Baustatik-Baupraxis 2012.



158

 

 

Concepts for adaptive textile membrane
constructions
                                  
T. Gerek;e''E. Hufiiagl", O. Dobrich', C. Cherif"
' Technische UniversUcit Dresden, liistUitte of Textile Machinery and High
Performance Material Technology', 01062 Dresden, Germany

Abstract
Textile membranes are the basis for a miiltitude of novel technical lightweight
solutions in high performance fields such as architecture, automotive, sports, and
recreation. To flirther access the high potentials of textile membranes in the growing
market of technical textiles and thus to establish the basis for an increased textile
production, it becomes necessary to improve their properties and to reduce
manufacturing costs. Previous membrane constructions are oflen reinforced with
woven fabrics, whereas the usage of warp-knitted fabrics is limited due to some
drawbacks. Owing to the knitting threads required for joining the layers, a larger
amount of coating is used. However, they olTer the possibility of a multiaxial fibre
orientation and of a high manufacturing efficiency. Concepts for the development of
a technology for the process-integrated manufacturing of high-strength membranes
on the basis of multiaxial stitch-bonded fabrics using a warp-knitting process will be
presented. The warp-knitting process will be extended with such production steps as
thread manipulation, spreading, and coating/ lamination. Accompanying finite
element analyses using a textile material model will provide input for fiirther textile
structure developments. It will be possible lo provide high performance textile
membranes with tailored properties and low costs.

Keywords: adaptive textile reinforcement, finite element analysis, stitch-bonding,
warp-knitting

1           Introduction

Technical textile membranes are innovative, usually thin and mainly tensile-stressed
materials that can be designed through material selection and construction to meet
diverse fimctions, such as separation, wrapping, filtering, load bearing, load
distribution, and protection against weather, noise or heat. This results in a wide

159

 

range of applications: membranes for textile construction, sails, solar protection
fabrics, billboards, tents, swimming pool and pond liners, containers, conveyors, oil
barriers, bellows, geotextiles, tarpaulins,                   inflatables,        life rafts, and protective
clothing. Textile membranes form the basis for a variety of novel technical solutions
for lightweight high performance applications. These are mainly u.sed in the
construction industry to implement textile architecture, but also in automotive,
sports and leisure applications. Examples of architectural use of membranes for
outdoor applications are roof solutions in many difTercnt designs, such as permanent
and semi-permanent coverings, movable roofs, additional extensions of existing
structures such as porches or walkways, but also temporary, reusable constructions
for booths, exhibition pavilions, tents, protection .systems against hurricanes, and so
on[l-4J.
In order to expand the potential of textile membranes within the growing market of
technical  textiles  that   is   apparent   from  the   various  applications,  both   the
improvement of the properties and the reduction of manufacturing costs arc
indispensable requirements [5-6]. Textile membranes are mainly reinforced with
woven fabrics, which offer a very good cost-benefit ratio for many basic and high-
performance applications. Specific multiaxial warp-knitted fabrics produced with a
stitch-bonding technique (stitch-bonded fabrics) are also being applied. However,
due to the knitting threads required for bonding the different layers, higher amounts
of coating materials are consumed, which is a disadvantage for cost-sensitive
products. The high potential of these .stitch-bonded fabrics resulting from the non-
crimped yarns, the possibility of a multiaxial  fibre orientation and the high
manufacturing efficiency is exploited in-sufTiciently at the moment. Especially
through new developments in stitch-bonding machines that follow the trend of
process integration, chances to establish membranes with enhanced properties based
on that technique are given.
The benefits from the possibility to include diagonal fibres within the manufacturing
process  of stitch-bonded fabrics  can   be    used    with    an    engineering  analysis
appropriate  for the material. However,  multiaxial  reinforcements reduce   the
lightweight character of the fabric. Thus, a novel technology is introduced, which
allows to manipulate the orientation of the warp yams within the stitch-bonding
process and to position them where needed for additional functions [8-12], This new
technology enables to adjust additional fibres in an optimal load-bearing direction
[12, 13]. The advantage compared to alternative solutions, such as stitching or
sewing   of additional   material  [14-19], is the   direct  application  during  the
construction of the surface without further process steps. These customized textile
structures can be used for reinforcing membrane materials according to their
mechanical demands.
This paper provides a theoretical example for adaptive membrane constructions. The
technology of the warp-thread manipulation is introduced and the application for
yarn positioning in the load-direction for reinforcing technical membranes is
explained. A numerical simulation with the finite element method demonstrates the
improvement of structural membranes reinforced with the presented textile structure
compared to commercial membrane materials.

 

160


 2           Stitch-bonded high-performance membrane material with a
warp yarn manipulation

The presented textile structures are technical reinforeement components made of
high-pcrCormance yarns. Separate layers (biaxial «r multiaxia!) are bounded together
by an extended warp knitting process [20|. The layers ean be stacked to symmetrical
or asynnnetrical textiles. These structures ean be produced with stitch-bonding or
raschcl  machines.  Figure   I    shows  examples  of" asymmetrical  stitch-bonded
structures.

The yarns have a high load-bearing capacity in the fibre direction only. The
manipulation of warp yarns of the multiaxial warp-knitted fabrics aims for a better
load-adjusted orientation of the reinforcement structure. Additional yarns are placed
in zones with advanced loading conditions. A manipulation unit within the stitch-
bonding machine enables to change the orientation of the reinforcement yams in the
warp direction deviant of the standard 0°-orientation (Figur 2).
The idea of manipulating the warp yarn orientation within the fabric was realized at
die Institute of Textile Machinery and Ihgh Performance Material Technology
(ITM) on the multiaxial w�arp-knitting machine Malimo 14024 [8J. The concept of
tliis technology is explained in Figur 2. One challenge is to control the motion of the
warp yams correctly. The yarns are forced to lit to the correct position at the stitch-
bonding area, where they are stitched onto the multiaxial grid structure,

 

161

 

An implemented machine control system adjusts the motion of the manipulation
unit. The course of motion starts at a crossing point of the warp- and weft yarns. The
following motions are done in steps according to the grid size to ensure that the
additional yarns can be stitched onto the grid structure. Examples of fabrics with
manipulated warp yarns are shown in Figure 10. It is obvious that a change of the
yarn direction always starts at a crossing point of warp and well yarns.
The benefit of this technology is the fast and online application of additional yarns
for an optimal load-adjusted reinforcement. This qualifies these textiles for the use
as high-performance reinforcement and for the implementation in co.st-cfllcient
production chains. Applications can be found in the civil construction sector (walls,
ceilings etc.) or in injection molded composites in large-scale production [6].

3           Model for simulating reinforced membranes with warp
manipulation

For an adaptive dimensioning of membrane structures, a finite element model was
used. For the case study of a typical membrane application (silo roof for biogas
containment) a warp yam laying scheme is presented and a model for numerical
simulation is introduced. Figure 4 shows the dimensions of the silo and the shape of
the roof For purposes of manufacturing the roof was divided into conical strips as
shown in Figure 5. Three different materials were examined theoretically for
purposes of showing the ability of load-adjusted reinforcement structures (Table I).
Firstly, the construction was analysed for the use of a standard membrane material
(denoted Material 1). Two additional variants of theoretical membrane material
constructions were included: a membrane material with a commercial reinforcement
in the warp direction (Material 2) and a material with a manipulated reinforcement
in the loading direction (Material 3). The positions of the reinforcing yarns of each
variant are shown in Figure 5. The roof construction was analysed with all three
materials for different load cases presented in Table 2. To obtain input parameters

 

162

 

for the simulation model, biaxial-tensile tests were perihrmcd on a 100 kN biaxial
testing machine (Zwick GmbH & Co. KG).

Membrane
material

PVC

PVC
PES-tabric +

PVC
PES-iabric +

Reinforcement
material

PES-tabric

2.5 %voLGF-yarn
reinforcement (0°-
dircction)

2.5 %voLGF-yarn
reinforcement
(load-direction)

 

 

 

163

 

Load

Pretension

Snow load

Self-weight

 

Load
condition

3.1 kN/m
(warp direction)
1.4 kN/m
(weft direction)

 

0.68 kN/m�
vertical pressure

 

1050 g/m=

 

 

 

 

For the simulation of the mechanical behavior of" the introduced materials, an
orthotropic material model was used with finite membrane elements. The material
character of the classic membrane material and the membranes, which are reinforced
with perpendicular grid structures, were realized with this implementation and differ
in their material parameters. Attention was paid to the element orientation for correct
directional stiffness assumptions. The reinforcement structures with manipulated
yarns were implemented using beam elements. Figure 6 shows an illustration of the
manipulated yams, which are stitch-bonded onto the ground-structure. As shown,
the additional yams pass a certain unbounded length. Lateral forces can be induced
into the basic structure at the stitch-bonded points only, which is uncritical since the
main function of the manipulated yarns is to bear tensile loads.
To realize this textile construction within a simulation model, a hybrid-model
composed of membrane and beam elements, is                    introduced.            The commercial
inembrane and the orthogonal reinforced membrane were modeled with membrane
elements and the single manipulated yarns were modeled with beam elements. To
implement the stitch-bonded sections, equivalent nodes at the crossing-points of the
grid structure and the single yarns were merged together as simplified contact
condition. For discretization, the additional added yarns were combined to one yarn
with correct orientation.


164

 

4             Results and discussion

For comparing (he three materials theoretically, a simulation ol' the silo roof
deflection     under    certain    loading    conditions    was    performed.    The    ineinbrane
construction was loaded with the conditions specified in Table 2. The results of the
membrane-roof deflections are shown        in   Figure    11.   'I'he diagram     shows the
deflection in a cutting plane of all three materials under the same loading conditions.
The commercial membrane material (Material         1) shows the largest deflection
compared to the ones with additional reinforeement. The orthogonal reinforced
membrane material (Material 2} shows a better load-bearing behaviour than the
nnreinforeed one. This improvement was achieved with an additional fibre volume
fraction of 2.5% only. How ever, the result of the membrane material reinforced with
manipulated yarns (Material 3) shows, thai a load-adjnsted fibre orientation has the
benefit of an even better load-bearing behavionr. Figure 8 shows a simulation result
of the roof deflection achieved with the finite element simulation with the given
loading conditions,

165

 

5          Conclusions

Simulation results suggest tliat the technology of manipulating warp yams and the
additional application of reinforcement yarns in the loading direction increase the
load-bearing behaviour of membrane materials. A load-adjusted construction of
textile membrane reinforcements can be obtained with the presented technology
without an additional fabrication step. The lightweight character of construction
materials such as technical membranes can be increased.

Acknowledgements

The IGF research projects 17241 BR and 16977BR of the Forschungsvcreinigung
Forschungskuratorium Textil e. V., Reinhardtstr. 12-14, 10117 Berlin are ftinded
through      the     AiF     within      the     program      for     supporting      the     „lndustrielle
Gemeinschallsforschung (IGF)" from funds of the Federal Ministry of Economics
and Technology (BMWi) by a resolution of the German Bundestag. We thank these
institutions for the provision of financial resources.

References

[1]    ANONYMOUS, Deri "fiinfteElement". Textile Memhranen in der
Archiiektur. architektur Vol. 7, no. 2, 2000, pp. 60-68.

[2]    KOCH, K.-M., Renaissance im Bauen mil Membranen. KNECHT, P.
(ed.), Technische Textilien. Reihe Edition Textil, Deutscher Fachverlag
GmbH, Frankfurt am Main, 2006.

[3]    KOCH, K.-M. (ed,), Bauen mit Memhranen. Prestel Verlag, Munich,
2004,

[4]    DEINHAMMER, A.-V., Vertikale Begiiiming von Gehdiiden mit Hilfe
von Membranen. CD-ROM Proceedings of the 48. Chemiefasertagung,
Dornbim, 2009.

[5]    KAUFMANN, A., Der 5. Bau.itaff- Bauen mit Membranen.
Proceedings of the I. Bauphysikalisches Fachsymposium zum
konstruktiven Membranbau, Stuttgart, 2006.

[6]    ANONYMOUS, BA UGENIAL erwartet deutlichen Wachsttmisscimb im
Leichtbau. http://www.rigips.com, 2009.

[7]    BRAUN, D., Wirtschaftspressekonferenz Techtextil und Material
Vision. http;//www.messefrankfi.irt.com, 2010.

[8]    OFFERMANN, P., DIESTEL, O,, FRANZKE, G., HOFFMANN, G.,
ENGELMANN, U., GODAU, U., SCHINKOREIT, W., Te.xtile
Verfahrensentwicklungen am ITBfiir kmgfaserverstarkte Composites.
Proceedings of the 2. Nationales Symposium der SAMPE Deutschland

166


e. v.: Neue Werksioffe in Industrie und Forschung, Dresden, 1996, pp.
81-94.

[91    FRANZKE, G., OFFERMANN, P., IIORSTING, K., WULFHORST,
B., Neuanige texHie FUichengebildeJtir Faserverhnnihverkstoffe.
Melliand Textiiberichie, Heidelberg, 1993, Vol. 74, no, 5, S. 379-383.

[W] b\U[�NAGL, E., IVeifereiitwickliing und Atm�efidting ihermopkisfischer
eudlosfaservers/arkler mehraxialer Gi/ters/rukUiren ah
Fimktiomeletrtent. http://tii-dresden.de, 2009.

[II] CHERIF, C., HUFNAGL, E., Textile Gitter verbessern die
Eigenschafien von Spritzgusahaiileilen. DKs6nzrJxAns,fsrhnc(�'Wo\. 17,
no. 3, 2009 p. 10.

[12] YOUNES, A., HUFNAGL, E.,CHER1F, C., ORTLEPP, R.�Grid
stmclures baaed on a manipulated warp yarnfeeding system as
additional reinforcement� Teehnical Textiles, Vol. 55, 2012, pp. 154-
156.

[131 OFFERMANN, P., DiESTEL, O., FRANZKB, G., BERTHOLD, R.,
MARX, K., SCHRAMM, 11., Stenersystemfur Kettfaden, Patent: DD
256 882 A I; Techtiische Universitat Dresden, 1986.

[14] GLIESCHB, K,; HUBNER, T.; ORAWETZ, H.; Application ofthe
tailored fibre placement (TFP) process for a local reinforcement on an
open-hole" tension platefrom carbon/epoxy laminates. Composites
Science and Technology; Vol: 63, no. I, 2003, pp. 81-88.

[151 KOLKMANN, A., GRUNDMANN, T., GRIES, T.�Lokale Verstdrkimg
in Bevt'ehrungstextilien. AVR-Allgeineiner Vliesstoff-Report, 2005, pp.
31-32.

[16] BRANDT, J., DRECHSLER, K., FILSINGER, J., y/j/iowif/Ve (tu7/7f
technologiesfor the cost effective manufacture ofhigh performance
composite structures. Proceedings of the 1st Slade Composite
Colloquium, Stade, 2000, pp. 13-21.

[171 FILSINGER, J., DITTMANN, R., BISCMOFF, T,, Textile preforming
technologiesforftiseluge applications. Proceedings of the 25tli Jubilee
International SAMPE European Conference of the Society for the
Advancement of Materials and Process Engineering, Paris, 2004.

[181 DRECHSLER, K., Chancen fiir CFK im Automobil- ttnd Flugzeugbau
diirch integrierte Fertigiifigstechnik. Proceedings of the Bayern
Innovativ-Syjnposium mit Faehaussteliung Polymere im Automobilbau,
Munich, 2006.

 

167


[19] ANONYMOUS, TcxlUe Hybridslrukturen fiir Thermoplasthaiiteile.
http-.//mlu.m\v.tu-dresden,de, 2007.

[20] FRANZK.E, G., Verfahren und Kettemvirkmaschine zur Herslelhmg
eiiies Keftengewirkes mil eingelegten Versldrkiingseleinenten, Patent;
DE 101 63 730 CI. Karl Mayer Malimo; Textilmascliincnfabrik, 2003.

 

Design process optimisation and form
finding using parametric 3D modelling and
simulation tools

Wouter Brok (ing. B BE)''� Patrick Teuffcl (Prof. Dr.-Ing.
/ TEUFFEL ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS
2 Rotterdam University ofApplied Science
3 Eindhoven University of Technology�

Abstract
The first possibilities for engineers to analyse membrane structures were based on
physical modelling; now approximately 60 years later this task is nearly completely
overtaken by computer simulations. Through the years the software has improved by
using better form finding algorithms, resulting in highly advanced software.
Given   the growing  complexity of lightweight membrane structures and            the
increasing time pressure to develop projects, one must constantly search for new
optimizations. Even while designing lightweight membrane structure is a highly
interactive process, there arc opportunities to improve the process.
This paper deals with the question of how new or already existing software can be
used to create a more elTicient automated process for standardized lightweight
structures.
Using new modelling techniques, the form finding can be transformed ft-om a
manual to an automated process. The explored process is called "generative
modelling", a modelling technique consisting of algorithms based on parameters.
This approach is converting the manual design steps in subsequent processing steps
using parametric input.
This process optimisation using various interconnecting software packages, such as
Rhinoceros, Grasshopper, GSA, Formfinder and EASY leads to various design
templates and a case study, which will be described within the paper. Further on a
review about various form finding and analysis methods has been carried out and
will be presented as well,
Keywords: Lightweight strticlures, Optimisation. Generative modelling, Parametric
fortn finding

169


1           Introduction

Designing lightweight membrane structures is a highly interactive process between
the engineer and the architect. This niultidiseiplinary design process is supported by
highly developed software to analyse these kinds of structures.
The first ways for engineers to analyse membrane structures were based on physical
modelling, now approximately 60 years later this task has almost been completely
overtaken by computer simulations.
By implementing and connecting new modelling techniques, simulation tools and
interconnecting software in this process, manual steps are transformed to automated
steps. This creates the po.ssibility to optimize the design process of standardized
membrane structures.
Every membrane structure is built up using basic membrane shapes like; saddle or
hypar   shaped   structures. Through   experience  and   practise,   designing   and
constructing  four    point   hypar   shaped   membrane   structures  became   more
standardized. However, despite the fact that these structures are more standardized,
the design approach often requires a great amount of time; finding the right
geometry and using several separate simulation and modelling tools.
This paper describes a study of optimizing the whole design approach for these
standardized membranes structures using new parametric modelling techniques,
simulation tools and interconnected software packages. This will establish a total
subsequent process using parametric input.

2           Definition and application of generative modelling

Generative modelling is a modelling technique based on parameters combined with
algorithms. This technique differs fi-om commonly used modelling methods.
Using standard "Computer Aided Design" (CAD), a shape is built up; starting with a
simple level of geometry (points and lines) and e.xpanding this geometry till the
desired model is reached. In standard modelling systems, 3D objects are defined and
created of simple geometric primitives. The modelled geometry is not connected and
is not influencing each other.
To define the geometry in space, the user is defining points and curves as fixed
parameters. Beginning with a fixed parameter (defined as x, y and z coordinate) and
ft�om there each element is built up separately.
Generative modelling is a change in how shapes are built-up. The change with this
drafting method is the transformation from just drawing points and lines to
connected operations. A shape is described by a series of processing steps, rather
than just the result of manually applying operations.
This method is very general and can be used for any shape representation that offers
a set of mathematical generating functions. [2]
Using generative modelling to approach standardized membrane shapes offers
possibilities compared to CAD techniques. With this method one is able to create

 

170


generative design templates, whore according to the in put (parameters), the right
shape automatically is found and created.
These design templates can be used to find and create the specific shape of a four
point hypar, according lo three-dimensional input. Also templates can be established
for standardized membrane details, with parametric input according to the
membrane geometry, forces in the membrane surface and supporting structure,

3           Software and simulation tools

Parametric tools
The parametric tools used for the generative design templates are Rhinoceros and
plug-in Grasshopper.
Rhinoceros is a standard modelling package specialised in NURBS and complex
shapes, li is used as basic modelling software for parametric 3D modelling and
simulation optimizations.
Rhinoceros has the capability to export and import almost any modelling extension
known today, which makes it possible to connect it easily to other software
packages.
On top of the manual drafting tools. Rhinoceros offers an Application Programming
Interlace (API) option. API offers the possibility for other developers to work with
the program and extend the use with plug-ins programmed by second party
developers.
One of these API's is Grasshopper, a graphical algorithm editor. It is a generative
modelling design tool that operates as a Rhinoceros plug-in. The power of this
drafting method with Grasshopper is the use of parameters. This program has the
ability to create parametric models capable of working as programmed templates.
It is possible to start a template with algorithms and different kind of parameters, in
the same way as membrane detail in figure 1. Together they can turn a fixed design

171

i

nto a parametric design that can be explored in numerous simulation environments.
A various amount of these simulation tools are working through plug-ins or
interconnected with Grasshopper.
The advantage of these design templates is the fact that they give a direct graphical
output in the interface of Rhinoceros and one is able to work from a single basic
template.
Grasshopper  works   by    combining   different
operators,     modelling      and       programming
commands, to each other with parameters as
input. Figure 3 shows an example of a few
operators linked together inside Grasshopper. [1]

In this study the simulation tools Oasys GSA suite and Technet GmbH EASY arc
used to demonstrate and substantiate the optimizations.
GSA suite is a FEA software package developed by Arup's software department
Oasys. Besides the possibility to calculate conventional structures like buildings and
bridges, it also includes a form finding solver based on dynamic relaxation.
EASY is a total engineering package specialist for designing and calculating
lightweight surface structures, developed by Technet GmbH. This program includes
options for form finding, statical analysis and generation of cutting patterns based on
the force density method.
Interconnected software packages
The connection between generative modelling and simulation tools is made with the
software package ssiGSA, developed by Geometry Gym. This tool works inside
Grasshopper and connects the program to the simulation tool GSA suite.
This ssiGSA tool creates the opportunity to interact and exchange generative models
with GSA suite related to structural analysis. Not only has it got the opportunity to
export a generative model to the structural analysis program. It extracts the solver
functions from GSA suite with a possibility to use them inside a generative model.
This means one is able to use the form finding solver (gsrelax solver) of GSA suite
inside of Grasshopper.
The connection between generative modelling and simulation tool EASY can be
made using CSV files or DXF illes,

4          Case study: design process optimisation of a 4 point hypar
sail

Using a case study, the interconnection and optimisation between generative
modelling and simulation tools is explained. In this study the subsequent design
process from finding the right three-dimensional shape towards paratnetric form
finding and structural analysis, including parametric membrane details, is shown.

172

 

The case study will be compared widi a standard design approach, using CAD
modelling in combination with the simulation tool EASY.
The first case includes a generative modelling template, created by the authors, to
find the geometry of a four point hypar and export it as DXF or CSV files towards
the simulation tool EASY. Inside EASY the form finding process is done manually,
while for this program there is no interconnected software plug-in available yet
connecting the simulation tool to generative modelling software.
Secondly, a study including the generative modelling template is performed, now
interconnected with GSA suite using the ssiGSA tool. It shows the optimisation
throughout the whole design approach including parametric form finding and
possible stmctural analysis.
In both studies the input is 3D dimensions for a standardized four point hypar shape.
Figure 4 shows the steps of the two researched studies.



173

 

study 1

1.     Finding geometry using                    I.
generative modelling,

2.     Calculate length link connection            2,
with membrane inside generative
modelling template.

3.     Export geometry as DXF.                    3.

 

4.     Import DXF in EASY and Define         4.
form finding setting H form
finding.

5.     Detailing supporting structure            5.
using parametric details.


Study 2

Finding geometry using generative
modelling.

Defining form finding, supporting structure
(columns, backstay cables), loadcascs and
analysis tasks settings inside generative
modelling template.

Parametric fonn finding + automatic import
structure, loadcases and analysis tasks inside
GSA suite.

Statical analysis inside GSA suite.

 

Detailing supporting structure using
parametric details.

 

Step 1. Figure 5 shows the dimensions of the four point hypar sail for the both
studies. Using a generative design template which can be seen on figure 7, the 3D
geometry of the shape is found automatically, controlled and shown graphical in the
used modelling software. Figure 6 shows the graphical output of the shape.

174

 

Step 2. In study 1 the lengths of the connection between column and membrane is
calculated.
For the second study, not only the length of the connection detail is calculated but
also one is able to define the form finding settings; pre-stress and mesh properties.
Besides the form finding settings it is possible to define the geometry and sections of
the supporting structure, load cases and desired statical analyzing tasks.
Step 3. In study I the 3D output of the tool is exported as DXF from Rhinoceros.
Using the interconnected ssiGSA software in the second case, all the settings are
e,\ported automatically towards GSA suite including:
•      The geometry.
•      Form finding settings.
•      Supporting structure with sections and materia! properties.
•      Loads and analysis tasks.
Inside GSA suite the form finding analysis is performed automatically (figure 9) and
the form finding imported back inside the generative modelling template, as shown

in figure 8. [I]

Step 4. In the case of study 1, the DXF can be imported into EASY and the nonnal
manual processing steps can be performed to get the form finding and supporting
structure. To perform a statical analysis, all the settings have to be defined inside
EASY.
In case of study 2, the whole structure is already defined into GSA suite. Performing
a more detailed statical analysis is a matter of checking the structure and let GSA
suite perform the desired analysis. This is also possible to be included in a
generative modelling template.


 

 

 


176

 

Step 5. After all the required analyses are performed for both studies, the supporting
structure of the four point h>par sail has to be detailed. Using generative modelling
templates these details also could   be parameterized,
making the modelling of the details much more efficient
and less time intensive.

Kxample parameters:
� 1. i'rofile size
- �       2. Plate thickne.ss
3. Pin size
4. Size washers

 

Afler all the steps of both studies
are rcscarehed, a comparison is
made. The first one is between
the    two    ditTerent      simulation
tools: IZASY and GSA suite. In
figure 12 the graphical difference
between both tools is shown.
The second comparison concerns
the time. This is done between
the two studies and the design


Largest difference: 4.3
Figure 12. Graphical differenceform fimiing
output EASY & GSA suite.


jirocess without the use of
generative modelling and
interconnected software
packages.

 

177

 

6          Conclusion

The comparison of the two optimized design approaches and tlie standard design
approach for a standardized four point hypar sail shows significant difference in
time duration. By using a generative modelling design template an improvement in
the time duration of the design process and better controllable precision of the
geometric output is achieved. It is not only possible to find the geometry much faster
but also to parameterize standardized membrane details. Hereby the advantage of
this optimisation saves 50% of the time needed to detail the supporting structure.
Using Grasshopper for generative modelling one is able to create design templates
even without having knowledge of scripting. Wliereas working with generative
modelling in other software packages this scripting knowledge is normally required.
Building these design templates, one should consider creating the actual template
requires some investment of time.
Combining Grasshopper with simulation software using interconnected tools like
ssiGSA shows an optimisation of the whole design process. The connection between
Grasshopper and GSA creates a total parametric design approach. On the other hand
the combination of Grasshopper and EASY also achieves             significant time
improvements.
All together these new design processes save a lot of time for each project. The most
optimizations are reached by standardized membrane shapes. However, further
investigation could lead to new improvements for more complex shapes and forms.

 

 

178

 

7          Acknowledgement

Special acknowledgement goes to the following companies for supplying
liccnces and the software for this study.

Oasys GSA suite 8.6 (Oasys software, https://wwvv.oasys-software.coiTi/)
ssiGSA V 1.3.11 (Geometry Gym, https://www.geometrygym.com)

References

f 1]    BROK, W., Application of optimization and form finding tools in a
parametric 3D modelling and simulation environment.,
TEUFFEL ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS, Stuttgart, 2012.

[2]    TU Graz, generative modeling, http;// http;//www,generativc-
modeling.org/, 25-04-2012.



Acoustic performance of textile roofs. In
situ measurements.

Josep Ignasi de LLORENS DURAN'
' School ofArchitecture, Barcelona, (ignasi.llorens@upc.edu)

Abstract
The acoustic behaviour of spaces covered by textile roofs is primarily influenced by
matoria! properties and geometry, form and volume. In situ measurements have been
done to deal with the intluence of the aforementioned factors.    Sound absorption,
reverberation time, intelligibility and sound distribution were determined together
with some characteristics of the materials and geometry. As expected, the results
were not satisfactory. They are presented below, not as a scientific contribution, but
as a basis for a series of design recommendations derived from the measurements,
including advice for acoustic conditioning and improvement of existing spaces,

Keywords: acomtic design, textile roofs, structural membranes

1           Introduction

The expanding range of application of textile roofs implies an increasing demand for
good acoustics. Nevertheless, the characteristics of the membranes and the volume
enclosed by them do not provide favourable conditions.
To progress in the knowledge of unsatisfactory situations, the existing structures are
a source of valuable information. This is why in situ measurements have been made
of 5 installations, namely a swimming pool, a train station, an auditorium, and two
halls for festivals and exhibitions [10].
The measured properties were sound absorption [16], reverberation time (Schroeder
method  [14]), intelligibility (Rapid                                          Speech Transmission     Index     [7 and  13]),
background noise and sound distribution.



181



2 Principles of room acoustics



Good acoustics in architecture is the result of a tuticd combination between
geometry and materials.
The most significant material acoustic properties are absorption, reflection and
transmission of sound. Regular structural membranes are not usually suitable
because they have high reflectivity, while sound absorption and transmission vary
widely across the frequency range, [4 and 8]. and the noise reduction factor is poor
especially for low frequencies [3].
In combination with the materials, a significant acoustic property in architecture is
the reverberation lime, proportional to the dimensions of the room (the volume) and
inversely proportional to the amount of absorption provided by the enclosures. (This
means that doubling the absorption is equivalent to halving the reverberation time).
In textile architecture the volume tends to be high because the double curvature and
clear spans require height. Concerning the absorption, the high reflectivity of the
membranes has yet been mentioned.
The shape of the enclosure is also significant. In fan shaped halls, the time
dilTerence between the direct sound and the first reflection is excessive (more than
25 to 50 s). High ceilings and concave surfaces create echoes and double curvature
entails simultaneous concavities and convexities involving focussing and diffijsion,
respectively.

More aspects related to the geometry are the sound distances and distribution trough
the room and the intelligibility of speech, dependent on the reverberation time at mid
frequencies (350 to 1.400 Hz where the person hearing is more sensitive) and the
shape of the enclosure.
It should be noted from these principles that the geometry of structural membranes
does not favours good acoustics [5].

3          "San Pablo" swimming pool

A deployable structure composed by two spherical segments 30 x 30 m in plan (r =
19,15 m) was adopted for the San Pablo Swimming Pool in Sevilla (figs 3,4), where
the membrane is tensioned by many points suspended from the structural grid.

 

 

182

 

Size: 60 x 30 x 9,50 (max.) m - Volume: 12.000 m'' - Area: 1.800 m''
Material: PVC coated Polyester fabric (Prccontraint 705 by Ferrari) - Weight: 670 g/m'
Yarn linear density: 1.100 dtex - Tensile strength (warp and weft): 280 daN/5cm

Hz

125

250

500

1.000

2.000

4.000

Reverberation time (s)

1,60

1,20

1,94

4,15

6,40

5,17

Background noise (dB)

-

-

-

-

-

-

Absorption coefficients

0,45

0,62

0.39

0,15

0,05

0,01

 

 

 

The reverberation time is high at all frequencies and intelligibility low. Notice the
low absorption values at high frequencies. (Good acoustics in swimming pools is
needed to understand the coach's instructions).

4              EXPO-92 Station

A succession of nine 35 x 39,50 m modules consisting on 2 crossed latticed arches
each was adopted for the High Speed Train Station of the 1992 World Exposition in
Sevilla (figs. 5,6), where the membrane is tensioncd between the arches.

Size: 355,5 x 35,2 x 16 (max.) m - Volume: 30.000 m'' - Area: 12.500 m"


Material: double layer Precontraint 392 grey (outside) / Precontraint 1002 white (inside) by
Ferrari - Weight: 820/1050          - Yarn linear density: 1.100 dtex (both)_
Tensile strength (warp and weft): 300 and 300 / 420 and 400 daN/5 cm_

Hz

125

250

500

1.000

2.000

4.000

Reverberation time (s)

1,41

1,51

2,27

2,97

3,08

2,36

Background noise (dB)

50,3

49,4

47,6

46,8

42,0

30,4

Absorption coefficients

0,6

0,55

0,30

0,17

0,12

0,13

 

 

 

The reverberation time is not so high due to better absorption coefficients (double
layer) and volume fragmentation. Furthermore, the acoustic performance was
reinforced by electronic equipment. Intelligibility was not measured.

183

 

5              Porto Alcgre auditorium

The existing Araujo Vianna Auditorium in the Farroupiiha Park, Porto Alegrc, was
roofed in 1996 with a conic surface, 71 m in diameter. The PVC coated polyester
membrane was tensioiied between the central high point, supported by a latticed
I'ranie, and the compression ring running along the perimeter (figs 7,8).

ARAU.10 VIANNA AUDITORIUM, PORTO ALKGRK
Size: 0~ 71m-
Volume; 27.600 m"
Area: 4.000 m"
Material: PVC coated Polyester fabric (Vinilona MP1400 S77 by Sansuy S.A.)
Weight: 927 g/m".           Thickness: 0,8 mm_

Tensile strength (warp and weft): 270 kp/5 cm (DIN 53.354)
Tear resistance: 60 kp (DIN 53.363).                     Relative elongation: 20% (DIN 53.354)

llz

125

250

500

1.000

2.000

4.000

Reverberation

2,13

3,30

4,83

5,78

5,62

4,10

Background
Noise (dB)

Under rain

61,6

53,3

49,2

45,0

39,6

34,9

Not raining

57,7

50,7

46,5

42,8

35,4

28,2

Absorption cocf,

0,52

0,39

0,15

0,08

0,06

0,09

 

 

 

 

The reverberation time is very high at all frequencies and intelligibility low, because
the auditorium is one single high volume enclosed by a single layer of PVC coated
polyester membrane characterized by low absorption values at high frequencies. The
background noise far exceeds the recommended maximum values of 25 dB. All this
resulted in a very poor acoustic performance that requires improvement.

 

184

 

6              "El Palcnque" festival hall

A succession of twenty tlvo 25,40 x 13,50 m modules consisting on two 12,7 x 13,5
conoids each was adopted for the "El Palenque Festival Hall" of the 1992 World
Exposition in Sevilla (ng.9), where the membrane is tensioned between the high
points and the edges.

Size: 127 x 67,50 x 2(min) to 12(max) m - Volume: 25.000 m' - Area: 8.572,50 m"


Material: PVC coatcd Polyester fabric (Prccontrainl 705 by Kcrrari) - Weight: ')50R/ni�
Thickness: 0,9 mm - Tensile strength (warp and vveri): 4500/4200 N/cni_

Hz

125

250

500

1.000

2.000

4.000

Reverberation time (s)

1,92

2,10

2,95

3,56

3,41

2,44

Background nuise(dB)

-

-

-

-

-

-

Absorption coefficients

0,40

0,342

0,18

0,09

0,06

0,09

 

 

 

 

Although the roof is fragmented, the reverberation time suffers from the convexities
of the modules that favour the dispersion of the acoustic rays and        increase the
differences of direct and reflected paths arriving to the receiver. Again, absorption
coefficients are low at high frequencies. Intelligibility was not measured.

 

185

 

7                "Ambiente 92" exhibition pavilion

A continuous vaulted space frame to hang the membrane roof was adopted for the
"Ambiente 92" Exhibition Hall in Sevilla (fig.lO), where the membrane is
suspended from the structural grid.

 

AMBIENTE 92 EXHIBITION PAVILION, SEVILLA
Size; 84 x 36 x 9(max.) m - Volume: 20.000 nr' - Area: 3.000 m"
Material: PVC coated Polyester by Binistar - Weight: 850 s/m'

Hz

125

250

500

1.000

2.000

4.000

Reverberation time (s)

1,74

2,23

3,34

4,27

3,82

2.89

Background noise (dB)

47,7

40,1

36,2

33,4

25,9

24,7

Absorption coefficients

0,42

0,29

0,16

0,08

0,10

0,09

 

 

 

 

The values of the reverberation time are high at medium and high frequencies,
specially between 500 Hz and 4.000 Hz, where the human voice emits more
information. Background noise is high at low and medium frequencies showing poor
insulation, due to the lightness of the single layered membrane, and the intelligibility
is poor.

8             Summary of results

As expected, the results were not satisfactory because:

ABSORPTION

Hz

125

250

500

1.000

2.000

4.000

San Pablo

0,45

0,62

0,39

0,15

0,05

0,01

Station

0,60

0,55

0,30

0,17

0,12

0,13

Auditorium

0,52

0,39

0,15

0.08

0,06

0,09

Palenque

0,40

0,34

0.18

0.09

0,06

0,09

Ambiente

0,42

0,29

0,16

0,08

0,10

0,09

 

 

 

 

 

I. Absorption values of the surfaces exposed to sound are not appropriate for good
acoustics.

 

186

 

REVERBERATION TIME

Hz

125

250

500

1.000

2.000

4.000

San Pablo

1,60

1,20

1,94

4,15

6,40

5,17

Station

i,4I

1,51

2,27

2,97

3,08

2,36

Auditorium

2,13

3,39

4,83

5,78

5,62

4,10

Palenque

1,92

2,10

2,95

3,56

3,41

2,44

Ambiente

1,74

2,23

3,34

4,27

3,82

2,89

Optimal
Values
Beranek

Speech

1.17

1,17

1,17

1,17

1,17

1,17

Opera

1,98

1,78

1,58

1,68

1,68

1,68

Conccrt

2,22

2,02

1,72

1,82

1,82

1,82

 

 

 

 

 

 

shaped Teatro alia Scala, 1.2 sec; reelangular-shaped Grosser Musikvereinssaal, 2
sec [2]). These values are only suitable for Gregorian chants and make speech
unintelligible. Intelligibility measured values range from 18% (poor) to 54% (fair).
3. Sound distribution is also poor because of the differences in absorption of the
dilTerent frequencies. In addition, the curved shapes of reflecting surfaces cause
sound concentration and delays.
4. Disturbing background noise (24,7 to 61,6 dB) and transmission measurements
also reveal poor soundproofing. A maximum of 25 dB(A) is usually specified to
avoid disturbing background noise [11].

9              Design recommendations.

To get better acoustic properties with textiles the design has to focus on sizing the
volume, shaping the surfaces, choosing materials and controlling the sound paths in
order to adjust the reverberation time, to increase the acoustic insulation and to
avoid focused reflections.
Geometry, volume and shape define the direct and reflected distances from the
source. The cases presented above lack the consideration of this issues, unlike the
successfiil acoustical design of the Berlin Philharmonic Hall, based on the principles
of "music in the centre" (no listener is more than 30 m away from the stage) and the
fragmentation of the audience into blocks, that provides early reflections and avoids
focussing [2 and 4].
Regarding the materials, single membranes have a lack of airborne sound insulation
and absorption at medium and high frequencies [8]. Their greatly influence the
acoustic behaviour to such an extend that the aforementioned measurements show a
similar behaviour for different shapes and tension. The properties of the materials
can be improved adding absorbers or using double/triple layers divided by cavities
or insulation materials [17]. Fibrous and highly porous materials as absorbers
provide high absorption coefficients in the high frequency range (fig, 11).
Two examples from the literature illustrate the possibilities of combining materials
and multi-layering;


In the roof of the Cultural Centre in Puchheim (fig. 12), a noise reduction coefilcient
of 55 clB was attained varying the load of the different layers: (from outside) PTFE-
coated glass fibre fabric, air cavity, wire net, 80 mm iTiincral fibre insulation, space
mesh element filled with 20 mm quartz sand, 100 mm mineral fibre insulation.
vapour barrier, second mesh element filled with 20 mm quartz sand and PTFE-
coated glass fibre fabric [9].
In the Suvarnabhumi Auport (fig. 13) the noise reduction coefficient is 35dB
combining 5 layers: PTFE-coated glass fibre fabric (1.200 g/m" outside), air cavity,
6 mm transparent polycarbonate sheets attached to a steel cable mesh (7.200 g/m"),
air cavity and 330 g/m" open weave glass fibre primed on both sides vvith
transparent PTFE temiopolymer and low-e aluminium coating (inside) [6].

to            Acoustic conditioning and improvement of existing spaces.

Acoustic conditioning of existing spaces is based mainly on applying reflective or
absorbent materials and changing the sound paths. (Keep in mind, however, that
major construction work required to reduce a disturbing noise level by 1 dB (just
audible) is not justified [11]). Two outstanding examples arc the combination of
absorbers and diffusers of the Royal Albert Hall and the sound-reflecting panels
made by Alexander Calder for the "Aula Magna" Great Hall of the Central
University in Caracas [2].
Some textile roofs have also been conditioned or re-designed to get better
performance. It is the case of the Benedict Music fent in Aspen (figs. 14, 15). It was
originally designed by Eero .Saarinen in 1949 and replaced in 2000 with a PTFE
coated fibre-glass fabric enhanced by sound reflectors constructed of heavy canvas
stretched tight over a frame of metal mesh and coated with spray-applied
polyurethane. Focu.ssing geometry was avoided by the sinuous perimeter and sound
absorptive banners have been incorporated to reduce reverberation in the space
without     audience,     for    amplified     programs,  rehearsals     and    lightly     attended
performances, [n addition, massive construction was provided around the stage and
above a portion of the seating area (http://w\nv.kirkegaard.com/933).

 

188

 

BENEDICT MUSIC TENT, ASPElN |2, I5|
Marry Teaeiie Architccts & A.Pollock with Kirkcgaard Associates acoustical consulianls
Size: (main supporting structure) 35 m in diameter and 13.7 ni height           _
Volume: 19.830 m''
Area: 1377 m' (audience + stage + chorus)
Seats: 2050

Distance from Ihe front of the stage to Ihe most remote listener: 29,5 m_
Material: PTFE coated fibre glass Shccrfil manufactured and installed by Birdair


Hz
Rcvcrheratioii time (s)


125
3,2/3,3


250
3.2/3,3


500
3,4/3,6


1.000
2,9/3,15


2.000
2,1/2,5


4.000
1,55/1,8

 

11            Conclusions

The acoustic performance of textile roofs should be considered dttring the desigti
process. Attention has to be paid to the material properties and geometry in order to
control noise level, reverberation time, intelligibility and sound distribution. Lack of
attention to these factors will require acoustic conditioning, because the lightness
and geometry of structural membranes are not favourable.

References

[I]    ANTONIO, J., Acouslic behaviour offihrous mcileriais. FANGUEIRO,
R.    (ed),    Fibrous and composite materials for civil engineering
applications, Woodhead Publishing, Oxford, 2011, pp.306-324.

[2]     BERANEK, L., Concert halls and opera houses. Springer, New York,
1996.

[3]    BLUM,    R.,    Acoustic   and heat    transfer in   textile     architecture.
L.GRUNDIG (ed.) Textile Roofs, Technischc Universitat Berlin, 2003.

 

189


[4]    CROOME, D., Acoustical design for flexible membrane structures.
V.SEDLAK (ed.), LSA 86, Proceedings of the first international
conference on lightweight structures in architecture, University of New
South Wales, Sidney, 1986, pp.69-86.

[5]    FORSTERjB & MOLLAERT,M., European Design Guide for Tensile
Surface Stmctures, TensiNet, Brussels. 2004.

[6]     HEEG,M., Suvarnabhum International Airport Bangkok. Engineering,
manufacturing and installing the membrane roof DETAIL, no. 7/8,
2006, pp. 824-825,

[7]     HOUGASTJ.    &    STEENEKEN,H.J,M.,       The modulation      transfer
function in room acoustics, Technical Review, Briiel&Kjaerm no.3,
1985.

[8]     HUNTINGTON, C.G., The tensioned fabric roof, ASCE Press, Reston.
2004.

[9]     KOCH, K.M., Membrane structures. Prestel, Munich, 2004.

[10] MAYA SIMOES, F., Comportamiento acusticu de espacios cubiertos
con estructuras textiles, Tesis Doctoral, Universidad de Sevilla, 2000.

[11] MOMMERTZ,      E.,    Acoustics     and sound   insulation: principles,
planning, examples. Birkhauser, Basel, 2009

[12] NESMITH, L., Harbor encore. Pier Six Pavilion, Baltimore, Maryland,
FTL Architects, Architecture, September, 1992, pp.52-57.

[13] PEUTZ, V.M.A, Articulation loss ofconstants as a criterion for speech
transmission in a room. Journal of the Audio Engineering Society,
Vol.19, no.ll, 1971.

[14] SCHROEDER, M.R., New method of measuring reverberation time.
Journal ofAcoustic Society ofAmerica, no.3 7, 1965.

[15] SCHUETTE, D., Filling a void. The Benedict Tent in Aspen, Colo., .sets
a new standard in acoustics forfabric structures., Fabric Architecture,
sept-oct, 2001, pp. 48-50.

[16] SiLVAcustica de edificios, Laboratorio Nacional de Engenharia
Civil, Lisboa, 1995.

[17] VRIES, J.J.E. de. Triple-layer membrane structures. Sound insulation
poformance and practical solutions, MSc-thesis, Delft University of
Technology, 2011.



190

 

Elastica for Transformable Architecture,
ETA, and its use for tensioned membranes.

Valentina Beatini'
' Department ofA fchileclio-e, Izmir Instiliite of Technology, Turkey

Abstract
The proposed system is a flexible self-supporting structural profile, here referred to
as Elastica for Transformable Architecture (ETA). It acts as a Bowden cable; the
load-bearing element is a series of rigid voussoirs connected by a passing through
cable. Each ETA makes a self-supporting tbldablc structural skeleton of whatever
profile. Such structures can be arranged in grid or sequences and their stiffness can
be controlled by tensioning the passing through cable. Being their length constant at
a finite level, they can be connected to a tensioned membrane. Finally, special
connections can be u.sed to generate a transformable structure.

Keywords: Ridable structures, Euler elastica. tensile structures, non-linear spline,
cable-stiffened membrane, transformable structures, free -form surfaces

1          Introduction

The structural system herein proposed is made of a cable that runs with negligible
friction inside sheaths of voussoirs and can be tensioned at its ends. Wlien the cable
is tensioned, it pulls the voussoirs in contact to one another.
Through the design of the voussoirs, the system can reproduce at least in principle
whatever profile, with different degree of approximation of the target curve.
Stnicturally, the pretension in the cable, together with the shape of the voussoirs,
determines the stiffness of the system and the force necessary to its activation and
equilibrium under loads. By controlling such force, one can obtain a structure that
can change its equilibrium configurations according to design purposes.
Without joints apart the connections with the membrane, the system can be
efficiently folded, easily transported and fast erected. Since the length of each
system can be considered constant at a discrete level, and the deformation in the

191

 

cable can be controlled by the imposed tensioti, membrane's panels can be
connected to them.
I [ereinalter the system and its characteristics will be discussed.

2           Achieving the target profile

2.1        Straight hcani
Working on the shape of the voussoirs, the profile of the tensioned system can be
designed so to reproduce whatever curve, [f a cable passes through a series of
voussoirs. once it is Icnsioned, it puts the elemetits in contact to one another:
specilically, it puts the voussoirs tangent to one another. Considering simple circular
voussoirs. a straight line can then be obtained drilling the elements along a diameter.
project curve = appro.xiniiuiny piilyliiic
vinissmr

2.2         Constant curvature
If the drilling direction is not diametric then the passing through cable puts into
contact the voussoirs along a curve.       Suppo.se an arch curve has to be reproduced.
The llrst step is to decide the maximum width Ri of composing elements. Then a
series of circumferences of radius 2Ri are drawn along the curve, the tlrst centered
and one end of the curve, the follovvings each centred on the latest intersection point
between the previous one and the curve (Fig. 2a). Tiic points connecting all the
centers of the circumferences of radius IRj are the knots of the appro,\imating
polyline. The disk-.shaped voussoirs are posed in the obtained knots, and being their
radius R�, then they do not intersect instead are tangent to each other,
2,2.1         Free form curve
The same construction holds if a more cotnplex curve, a free form curve is reached.
Again firstly the number of elements and their axial length are decided.       Then.
circles of radius IRi mark the knot of the approximating polyline and finally the
voussoirs of radius Ri arc inserted.

3           Grade of approximation of the target curve

Given a desired target curve, the accuracy of the approximating polyline depends
upon the number d of voussoirs. In fact, the axial polyline will have n+ I points on
the target curve. All the points of the target curve that fall inside the disks are
discarded since they are not constrained to belong also to the approximating
polyline. Fig. 3 shows the level of approximation of a target curve that is obtained

 

192

 

with disks ot radius Ri, 2Ri and 4Ri. If the target curvature is hinh with respect to
the raditis of them, clearly the polyline veers otTIt; when the target curve has the same
radius as the disk, il is actually reduced to a line.
To mediate between accuracy and dimension of elements, one cotild use voussoirs
of different width, depending on the curvature of the target profile. Fig. 4 shows the
approximation of a curve trough three types of disks with different radius. The
voussoirs should again be designed to be tangent to each other. With label referring
to the llgure, two cases can hold:

 

193

 

The disk of radius /?«+! is inserted after disks of radius Rii, with Rn+\>Rn. To draw
successive disks tangent to each other, construct a circle radius 2Rn+] centrcd on
the intersection point between the latest two disks, A; then a circle radius /?n tangent
both to A and to the intersection point between the curve and the latest circle, B,
finally the disk of desired radius Rn+I is centred on the intersection point between
the obtained two circles, C. Then, proceed_Iike usual.
The other case is illustrated by the disk of radius Rn+3 inserted after disks of radius
Rn-i-2, with Rii+3<Rn i-2. Here, add one imaginary disk of radius Rn+2 at the end of
the achieved construction, calling D its centre. Draw a circle of radius 2Rn+3
centred on the intersection point between the added imaginary disk and the latest
disk, £■; finally draw the disk of desired radius Rn+3 tangent to both the         added
profiles. Then, procccd like usual.

4           Structural behaviour

4A        Tension
Though the structural behaviour of the system had been previously presented in [1],
here are pointed out some aspects which are especially interesting for its application.
Being Lo the unstrained length of the cable; n the total number of voussoirs of width
/?,, under the hypothesis that friction is negligible and voussoirs are rigid, the tension
To that puts the voussoirs into contact is
Formula I.               Tf, = A�

where A� and       are the cross sectional area and the Young's modulus of the cable,
and the strain is Gr/ =                  - 1), with IRnlL�� > 1.
The corresponding elastic strain energy initially stored in the cable is

Formula 2.                                     ~ H

where Ao is the total elongation of the cable due to pre stressing.

194

 

Assume that the cable is initially strongly tensionecl. Increasing the tension, we may
consider that the rotations (pi after the deformation is moderate (infinitesimal
deformation, n □!). Thus, with labels referring to Fig,5 c, the discrete system can be
considered in a continuum approximation, i.e., 8/ □ Aq- Then A[/ is where 2X is the height of the voiissoirs and 2R their width. The behaviour can be
compared with the deflcction of a thin beam, or Euler elastic. In the latter the elastic
energy takes the Ibrm and the curvature becomes proportional to the bending moment. Then, in the
continuum approximation, the structural analysis of the system is identical to that of
a curved beam whose stillness El is equal to XR     
Moreover, most drawing software approximate smooth curves trough piecewise
cubic splines, which functional coincides with For.4, apart the constant El. In order
to draw the curve, the functional is minimized under a series of conditions between
each cubic pol>aiomial (interpolation, continuity of the first and second derivative)
and two boundary conditions (nattnal or clamped boundary), "fhe same construction
can be used for the ETA: imposing that the length of the chain remains fixed, each
voussoir's centre can be considered as one point while the control points correspond
to the end points of the piecewise cubic spline, whose tangent or curvature can be
imposed.

4.2         Height of dements
Due the above considerations, the general stiffness of the system for a given
curvature is proportional to the height of the voussoirs. To increase the stiffness, of
course bigger disk-shaped voussoirs could be used, but by so doing the resulting
profile could be very different fi-om the target curve, depending on the proportions
of the curvature and the voussoirs. Another strategy is to increase just the height of
the voussoirs giving them a lenticular .shape.

195

illustrates how to construct a system made of lenticular voussoirs, equal to
each other, with width R/, and height R\>Ra.
Firstly, with the usual construction, circles of the desired width 2R,} are drawn. Their
centres will be the centres ot the arcs of radius R/. These arcs have to be tangent to
each other and can be constructed in phases, each time drawing nl4 tangent profiles
of consecutive voussoirs. The approximating polyline is finally obtained connecting
all the tangent points.

 5           Construction of surfaces

5.1         Relationship between the membrane and the ETA
The eta is a highly foldable, fast deployable structural clement which can achievc
whatever   shape.  Tensioned  membranes  are   lightly,     elegant   structures. Both
structures can be particularly appreciated if they work together. In fact, ETAs can be
arranged sequentially or on a grid pattern, and act as a non-obtrusive .structural
skeleton; the membrane can be panelized to tbllovv them. Once the dead and live
loads are assigned, the bending stiffness of the structure could be controlled by
simply pulling or releasing the cables.
The intrados and extrados profiles of the voussoirs have no role in achieving the
target curve, and thus can be designed to allow the easiest and more appropriate
connections to the membrane. The voussoir Ircquency (the number of the voussoirs
over the length of the cable) favours both the accuracy of the structural curve with
respect to the target curve, as well as the connectivity of the membrane.
Regarding the installation and dismantling, the ETAs in these phases act like ropes;
the ETA becomes loosened by just relaxing the tension.
Once attached at the extremities to the main structure, the ETA does not need any
secondary structure. The tensioning can be conducted through servo-hydraulic
apparatus or other usual techniques. Each ETA theoretically can fold independently
from the others, and the choicc of the folding sequence depends just upon the
panels' layout and upon activation techniques.
Since the cablc is protected by the rigid voussoirs, and since there arc not Joints, the
aging of the system is delayed.
5.2        Supporting lines
fhe easiest surfaces to be achieved are those where the membrane needs a series of
supporting linear structures.. ETAs can be designed each one to reproduce the
profile of one supporting structure; then they arc arranged in series, one separated by
the others. The membrane would be tensioned between the consecutive ETAs. The
profile assumed by the cable-stitTened elastica depends just on the opportunities for
the membrane.

197

 

5.3          Supporting Grids
In case a surface is designed such that
the      membrane    needs      a     grid      of
supporting structural lines, firstly the
ETAs corresponding to each line arc
designed. At the intersection points, the
ETAs    need     lo    overlap     so    special
voussoirs are needed. The voussoirs will
be multifaceted, having a number of
faces    at least twice      the number of
intersecting       cablcs;     cach     face     will
maintain      the    original      shape    of the
corresponding  original     voussoir.     The
intersecting voussoirs will also have
crossing holes that allow the cables to


 

0

b)
smoothly pass-through with no mutual
interaction,
Figure S. Mien a surface needs
imersecting structural lines to be
realized, ETAs should intersect
each other (a). Special voussoirs
can be designed at the points of
intersections (b).



5.4        Convertible forms
The profile of the ETA is obtained through the design of the voussoirs and by
imposing the tension in the cablc. In particular, at each end of the cable, one can fix
the normal force, or curvature, or apply a torque, imposing the tangent.
The end points are thus control points of the whole system.
From the above considerations some interesting consequences can be pointed out.
If another control point is added, it virtually separates the elastica into two parts. If
in each part the initial conditions, such as geometrical and structural, are restored,
then the initial profile of the elastica is also maintained.
Conversely, if the forces or the geometrical conditions in the added control point are
changed, then other possibilities are disclosed.
Fig.9 shows an ETA, schematized by its span and length, with end points A,B, and
added control point C. Initially, C is inactive and the elastica acts as a whole. Once
activated {Fig.9, below) it reproduces the same conditions on the left side of the
ETA. while it allows the right part to be rotated. Another possibility is to leave the
right part slack so that it can be suspended between the control point C and whatever
other point whose distance is reached by the slack cable.
The satnple is based on the assumption that the ETA is a rigid element in order to
design the linkage and to study its finite rotation. In fact, increasing the pre tension
or under external loads, the deformation can be considered negligible to respect to
the length of the ETA. The deformations can be successively superimposed and
controlled by integrated tension mechanisms.
More possibilities can hold if the elastica is part of a kinematic chain. As an
example, Fig. 10 shows a cable stiffened -elastica that acts as the coupler and
follower of a slider crank mechanism, a mechanism with one degree of freedom. Of
course, also a rigid bar could be used instead of the ETA, and its .shape could also be
curved. Nevertheless, avoiding a connected membrane to wrinkle or tear during

 

198

 

folding could be very difficult. Mere the key advantage of the ETA is the possibility
to relax and to tension the cable when and where necessary.


Conclusion

The proposed structural system is a high customizable structural .skeleton, which can
be folded and stiffened by tensioning its cable.                Using together the ETA and a
tensioned membrane, their key characteristics can be appreciated and valued.
Both structures can be easily dismissed, folded and packaged, so together they offer
improved   performances   for    temporary   applications,   for     the    emergency,
entertainment, military or aerospace engineering sectors.
Usually, more complex membrane surfaces need an increased number of rigid
supports. The design possibilities inborn ETA could favour the design of innovative
membrane surfaces while minimizing the number of supports. Being the ETA self-
supporting, it would not compromise the elegance and lightness of the membrane.
To develop the study in practice, a study should be conducted on the deformation of
the membrane and of the Eta under load and suited connections should be designed.
Finally, in cases where the external loads are negligible, as for interior applications,
a releasable ETA and an elastic fabric could generate a "pulsing" facade or roof,
adding a time-variable to the experience of space.
Fig.] I summarizes the key advantages of the integrated system ETA-membrane.

References

[1]    BEATINI, v., ROYER-CARFAGNI, G., Cable-stiffenedfoldable
elasticafor movable structures. Engineering Structures, to appear.

[2]    LOVE, A.E.H., A Treatise on the Mathematical Theory ofElasticity,
The University Press; Cambridge: 1906.



200


Specifying Structural Composites for
Architectural Use

Marccl Dery'
' Saint-Gohain Performance Plastics

Abstract

The detailed nature of the reinforcing yams in sluictural composites plays a
paramount role in determining the response of the composite to applied physical
loads.  This is intuitively obvious for properties such as ultimate tensile strength,
which is by and large simply proportional to the number of yarns in any given cross
sectional area and the strength per unit area.

However, it is somewhat less obvious that properties such as flexural strength or
flexural endurance are not linear ftmctions of the number of yarns per unit area, but
rather are exponentially related to features such as filament diameter and the number
of filaments within the yarn.   Since the flexural behavior of these composites is
important  during the pre-fabrication,                                               packaging, shipping and              installation                    of
structural modules, it is important to the success of such projects that such behavior
be taken into account when designing the composites themselves.

No less importantly, a structural membrane, once installed under a prescribed biaxial
pre-stress to achieve mechanical stability and a pre-determined shape, will continue
to undergo periodic, localized deformations related to dynamic loads associated with
wind pressure and snow.          These "macro" deformations are mirrored by "micro"
deformation  of the   reinforcing  yarns  and   filaments  within   the   composite.
Consequently,  the   extensibility and   flexibility  can   be    important  factors  in
determining the long-term utility of a membrane structure.

This paper addresses the difTerences in behavior one may observe for a coated fabric
composite base on PTFE and fiberglass yarns differing in the diameter of the
smallest filaments employed in constructing the woven reinforcement.         It is
demonstrated that a substantial difference in behavior can be encountered related to
this seemingly minor difference in composite design as a result of the difference in
resistance to fiexural damage.

201

1           Introduction and Background

Coated structural fabrics utilizing vvoven rciiiiorccments have been available for
well   over fifty years.   These have been based  upon  a    variety of woven
rcinforcemonts including cotton, nylon, and polyester as well as a variety of
polymcric coatings including elastomers such as neoprene and plastics such as
polyvinyl chloridc.       Over the past forty years, one particular reinforced composite
has become widely acccptcd for permanent structural end-use as a result of its
unique capabilities to provide the necessary strength and flexibility in tension to
accommodaie the very substantial loads associated with long span designs while
offering long service life and virtual incombustibility, the requisite behavior for
architectural applications.
'fhe acceptance of this composite is based largely on the excellent performance of
the original architectural composite (SHEERFILL®) using glass llhcrs as the
reinforcing elements in a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) (Teflon*) coating matrix.
The fiberglass reinforcement represents the major strength element which is, pound
for pound, as strong as steel and is virtually incombustible�''.    The PTFE matrix
represents the most incombustible plastic known to science, requiring an atmosphere
of over 95% oxygen to support combustion, and is known to withstand the outdoor
environment for over 20 years with virtually no change in physical properties      in
short, fiberglass and PTFE are highly complementary materials, well suited to the
application if properly combined to maximize the virtues of each while tnininiizing
their limitations       However, the realization of excellent membrane performance
in-use is based not simply on the selection of fiberglass and PTFE as input material,
but more precisely on the exact nature of the forms of these raw materials employed
as well as the exact nature of their combination as a composite.
While it may seem almost self-evident, it should be recognized that the selection of
virtually incombustible materials for an architectural composite with great life
expectancy in the outdoor environment was viewed as imperative. But, it was also a
selection that would demand careful engineering in order to fully realize the benefits
of each material. Glass fiber, like many other high modulus fibers, has exceedingly
great strength but relatively low elongation.       This is a properly that must be taken
into account at every step when incorporating it into a composite whose virtue is to
be its flexibility as well as its strength.
The initial success of this new composite material was very gratifying. The first
project to use this material was the Student Center at the University of La Verne in
La Verne California in 1973. The project was made of some 6,000 square meters of
SHEERFILL product. Within 10 years the Ilajj Terminal was built in Saudi Arabia
using about 400,000 square meters of material, an incrcdible accomplishment by any
measure.
Hovvever, some wondered whether this composite would fie limited in penetrating
into the market because of cost. They questioned whether certain applications would
be excluded from possible use.                                                            CFIEMFAB (now Saint-Gobain                                                               Performance
Plastics) and Owens Corning (now AGY) undertook a project to see if other

202

 

 

materials could be incorporated to bring down costs. No substitute was coiiternplated
for PTFE. It is a unique material with characteristics that make it the coating matrix
of choice. Furthermore other tluoropoiymcrs such as PEP and PFA are quite a bit
more costly. This lell only one material to study; the fiberglass yarn, A clear choice
was to move to a larger diameter yarn (DE - 6 micron, rather than 3 micron Beta®
yarn) which was more readily available and lower cost.

2          Tests and Obtained Results

The first step was to create analogs of present products and look at the physical
properties results. This was done by both Owens Coming and CHEMFAB. Physical
results are listed below in tables (1 and 2).

CHEMFAB

Filament Diameter

 

Beta (3fim)

DE (6ftin)

Property

Warp

Fill

Warp

Fill

Weight (oz/sq.yd.)

38,7

37.1

Strip Tensile Strength (pli)

943

739

734

670

Trapezoidal Tear Strength (lbs)

83

101

68

80

 

 

 

 

Owens Corning

Filament Diameter

 

Beta (3�/m)

DE (6urn)

G

Property

Warp

Fill

Warp

Fill

Warp

Fill

Weight (oz/sq.yd,)

38,4

313

34,9

Strip Tensile Strength (pli)

701

465

650

529

508

430

Tensile Strength after
Crease-Fold (pli)

622

450

469

366

504

400

Trapezoidal Tear Strength
(lb)

65,1

77.0

58.1

70.8

49.1

71.0

 

 

 

 

 

203

 

Chart 1: Graphical Representation of Strip Tensile Strength vs. Tensile Strength
after Crease-Fold Tests by Owen-Coming, for BC and DE reinforced fabrics, values
in the boxes indicate amount of strength retained in %.

Further testing was done to look at biaxial strength of these products. This would
provide information relative to installed material and its ability to withstand wide
span loads (Table 3).

 

Beta

DE

Maximum Stress (pli)
1:1 Biaxial Load

 

475

 

469

 

 

The next step was to look at the ability of the finished composite to withstand the
rigors of fabrication, shipping to the construction site and actual installation. This
involves taking a roll good, cutting panels of different shapes and sizes, heat sealing
seams, folding the finished product, placing into a box for transportation, unpacking
the box at the construction site and proceeding to install the fini.shed, fabricated unit.
The fabric is put under severe mechanical stress during these operations. The fabric
should be able to withstand these operations and retain as much strength as possible.
To ensure the safety and long-term performance of the structure, DE (6 micron) yarn
reinforced composite would need to exhibit properties similar to the Beta yarn,

 

 

204

 

To assess each fabric's ability to withstand these nicchaiiica! stresses, the MIT flexlbld endurance test was used. (MIT Tester pictured at right.)   In   this test,    strips  of fabric arc
repeatedly    flexed      over    a     small    radius {approximately 0.015  inches)          by oscillating
theni through an angle of 135 degrees in each direction while under
 modest tension {ASTM D2176). Tables    4    and    5;     MIT    llexfold   testing
(CHEMFAB and Owens Corning) show the results of MIT Folding Endurance. The data
shows the number of flex cycles the fabric was
able to withstand prior to failure.
Table 4

CHEMFAH

Filament Diameter

 

Beta

DE

Property

Warp

Fill

Warp

Fill

MIT Folding Endurance
(cycles to failure)

10776

7140

4725

5344

 

 

 

Owens Corning

Filament Diameter

 

Beta

DE

G

Property

Warp

Fill

Warp

Fill

Warp

Fill

MIT                         Folding
Endurance
(cycles to failure)

 

4872

 

6069

 

1302

 

1128

 

810

 

663

 

 

 

 

205

 

Chart 2: Graphical Representation of MIT Folding Endurance Test, Owens-Corning
Data for Fabrics made with Three Different Yarns - BC, DE, G

MIT Folding Endurance
(cycles to failure)
7000
6000
5000
4000
3000
2000
1000

Warp                 Fill                 Warp                 Fill                  Warp                  Fill
Beta                                          DE                                             G

 

The effect oi' fdament diameter on the tlexibility of the composite membranes is
clearly evidenced by the results of the MIT folding endurance test.         These results
brought the use of an alternate yarn into question.
The behavior of biaxially ne.\ed composite
membranes   was    studied   extensively   in
Owens-Corning laboratories.       The specimen
configuration used for those studies consisted
of a fabricated cylindrical tube with the ends
fixed to a metal plate. The fabric could be
placed in biaxial tension by pressurizing the
cylinder and tensioning in the axial direction
through the use of an MTS tensile tester. This
permitted a range of biaxial stress ratios to be
studied.
Using Owcns-Corning's biaxial test fixture
(pictured at right), any given specimen could
be mechanically challenged (pre-damagcd) by
lowering the 90-pound upper end-cap of the
cylinder to provide an axial crushing action
(called the 'crumpled cylinder test')   It is
thought that this crumpling damage simulates
the folding and flexing that can occur during
fabrication,    shipping     and      installation.

206

 

Crumpled specimens were examined for rupture strengdi and biaxial fatigue. While
the crumpled cylinder test represents a severe mechanical       challenge to the
composite, it olfcrs convincing evidence of the dramatically different responses that
can be expected as a result of changing lilament diameter in "comparably strong
yarns" of a given woven construction.
In the biaxial stress rupture lest, the cylinders were crumpled as described above and
then loaded biaxially (1:1) and time to lailurc recorded.   The results of these tests
indicated that 'the DH based membrane has a long-term, ultimate (biaxial) strength
between 125 and 150 pli.  By comparison the long-tcmi strength of the Beta based
membrane is approximately 175 pli'
The requirements for wind and snow load safely factors will vary from structure to
structure based on environment and the engineer's analysis of the design of the
structure.  However, using a typical pre-slress load of 35 pli, the remaining long-
term biaxial load bearing capability after folding damage provides the DB based
membrane a safety factor of 3,9 compared to a factor of 5.0 for the Beta ba.sed
membranes when tested under similar conditions.               It is important to note that the
actual level of stress required for rupture under biaxial loading conditions is
considerably lower than the ultimate tensile strength of the composite measured
uniaxially.     While this tact  is not surprising,     it underscores the reality of
damageability, in-situ, at stress levels that may be encountered in a membrane
structure under significant wind or snow loads.
Perhaps even more convincing of the superiority of a very fine lilament analog
(Beta) as opposed to a thicker filament analog (DE) in membrane structures is the
extent to which damage can occur on repeated biaxial Hexing (flexural fatigue).      In
this test cylindrical specimens were subjected to cyclic biaxial loading after a single
episode of crumpling. Data for composite membranes obtained in Owens-Corning
laboratories are shown in Table 6  This tjfpe of damage is analogous to that which
may occur due to the cumulative effects of wind or snow pressure over extended
periods of time.

 

Cyclcs to failure

Applied stress cycle (pli)

Beta

DE

70 ±40

>1,000,000

470

50 ± 30

Not tested

39,%0

 

 

over 2000 times as long as the "comparably strong" I)E filament based product.
Reducing the stress load to 50 pli permitted the fJE filament analog to survive only
4% as long as the Beta filament analog at the higher stress level!

 

207

 

These dramatically different responses of DE niament-based and Beta filament-
based membranes to biaxial stress under dynamic loads lend substantial credibility
to the specification of Beta filament based yams in architectural membranes when
damageability issues in handling or in-use are taken into account.
The llexibility of the fabric is directly related to the ability of the reinforcing yams
to be bent over a small radius, which is, in turn, a function of the filament diameter
and the packing of the filaments within the yarn.      Directly from mechanics, the
bending stiflhess of a cylindrical filament is a fiinction of the fourth power of its
diameter.  Typical filament diameter distributions for Beta® (3 micron) and DE (6
micron) yams are shown in Figure I    The average DE filament is about 1.5 times
greater in diameter than the average Beta filament. That means that a DE filament is
at least 5 times stifler than a Beta filament. The stiffness of a glass yarn constructed
from a multitude of filaments is determined by Ihe number, diameter and cabling of
the glass filaments.    If one takes ail of these into account, the durability of a fabric
made from DE yam after being bent over a small radius is even more dramatically
reduced as compared to a Beta yarn constructed fabric than the single filament
analysis would suggest.

As the folding motion proceeds and continuously reduces the radius of curvature,
the glass filaments fracture, starting with the largest diameter fibers (right side of
Figure 1) and continues to fracture successively smaller diameter filaments (toward
left side of Figure I). Essentially, any fold that fractures all of the DE filaments will
have fractured only a very small fraction (<5%) of the Beta filaments. Not only will
the Beta fabric tolerate a lighter crease (smaller bending radius) but the fabric is
much more damage tolerant when folded to any given radius.

 

 

208

 

3            Conclusions and Recommendations

Wliat this testing clearly pointed out was the absolute need to not only look at
uniaxial behavior of any membrane material but actual use handling and biaxial
behavior could show dramatically different results.
In this paper, Beta and DE based composite membranes were compared with respect
to their uniaxial (as manufactured) properties as well as after various simulations of
flexural and fatigue damage under uniaxial and biaxial load conditions.               Taken
individually, each test:
•      analysis of bending radii and filament breakage,
•      retenUon of strength after uniaxial (MIT) flexing,
•      relative levels of sustainable biaxial stress afier crumpling damage, and
•      ability to resist biaxial flexural fatigue
•      provides some indication of a need to be cautious in composite design and
use.
Taken in combination, they offer a highly persuasive argument for the selection of
Beta   filaments  in    the   construction of membrane   composites  for   structural
applications.
Furthermore, nothing speaks more convincingly to the viability and suitability of
Beta filaments in architectural composite membranes than the 40-year history of
their use in a variety of structural applications and environments all over the world.
Conversely, laboratory data suggest that there could be totally unacceptable risk in
the application of unprovcn composites employing heavier filaments in otherwise
similar composites.
Strength or extensibility that cannot be accessed and maintained during the
anticipated use of such a composite in an appropriately designed and built structure
must be avoided if structural integrity is to be attained.
For this reason, changes to the original                                        detailed raw material       and process
specifications for these architectural membranes should be undertaken only after a
thorough review of their impact on sustainable strength and extensibility under
tension,

References

[IJ    "Textile Fibers for Industry", OCF, Pub. No. 5-TEX-18027, 1994.

[2]    Sperati, C.A., "Physical Constants of Fluoropolymers", Polymer
Handbook, 3rd Edition, 1989.

[3]    Effenberger, J.A., "SHEERFILL® Permanent Architectural Fabrics and
Structures frotn CHEMFAB", Presented at a Symposium on Air-
Supported Structures: Stale of The Art, London, 1980.

209


4]


Effcnberger, J. A., "Choice of Beta Filaments for Structural Fabrics",


CHEMFAB Internal Communication 1979.

[5]    Leewood, A. R., "Technical Report 81-T-323: HAJ Material
Investigation Program", OCF, 1981.

[6]    Helwig, G.S., "Technical Report 83-T-2I: Effect of Filament Diameter
on Properties of Teflon-Coated Fiberglas Architectural Fabrics", OCF,
1983.

[7]    Lyie, D., Personal Communication, August 2000.
Shecrfiil®, Teflon® and Beta® are registered trademarks of the Saint-Gobain
Performance Plastics, flie E. I. DuPont Company and AGY, LLC,
respectively.

©2013 Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics, all rights reserved.



210

 

From mathematics to membrane
structures: translating architectural
surfaces into deployable scissor grids

Kelvin Roovers', Lara Alegria Mira', Niels De Temmerman'
' Department ofArchitectural Engimeriug, Vrije llniversiteit Brussel, Brussels,
Belgium

Abstract

Deployable scissor structures havL- ihe ability to translbrin from a compact state to a
deployed and expanded contiguration (llgure 1). Generally, they support a weather
protecting membrane which creates a functional envelope. These properties make
them reusable and ideal for temporary, mobile and lightweight applications.
A lot ol' geometric models have already been proposed for scissor structures, yet
most of them arc based on straightforward shapes such as a sphere or a cylinder
which might not always create optimal shapes for integrating a textile membrane. In
order to propose new and innovative geometries, deployable scissor structures based
on the angulated scissor component were investigated, 'fhis paper reviews the
development of a geometric design method, based on mathematics, to convert
continuous surfaces into scissor grids with angulated components. A design tool.
allowing   the   generation  of different  variations  of geometries,  based   upon
architectural  parameters,  is    developed  in    a    parametric  design   environment
(Grasshopper®   for      Rhinoceros®)-   Interesting   architectural    surfaces    for
incorporating a membrane surface are revealed which are evaluated at a conceptual
level according to their geometry and kinematic behaviour.

Keywords: Lightweight structures, deployable scissor structures, geometric design,
parametric design



213

 

1            Introduction

Deployable structures arc prefabricated space frames which can be transfortned from
a compact bundle of components into an expanded, load bearing structural system.
Because of this transformational capacity they arc adaptable to changing needs or
circumstances, olVering significant advantages compared to conventional, non-
deployable structures, 'fhey are used for a wide spectrum of applications ranging
from   temporary  structures  (emergency  shelters,  exhibition  and   recreational
structures) to the aerospace industry (solar arrays) [1-2],
Mobile deployable structures can consist of a weather protecting membrane
supported by some form of erectable structure, which is capable of being easily
moved in the course of normal use and can be assembled at high speed and on
unprepared sites. For this purpose, scissor structures are most effective: besides
being transportable, they have the great advantage of speed and ease of erection and
dismantling, while offering a huge volume expansion [3J.
Scissor structures consist of units which comprise of two beams connected throtigh a
revolute joint - the intermediate hinge - allowing a relative rotation. By connecting
such scissor units at their end nodes by hinges, a deployable grid structure is formed.
Finally, by adding constraints, the mechanism goes from the deployment phase to
the service phase, in which it can bear loads. Depending on the location of the
intermediate hinge and the shape of the beams, three main unit t>pes can be
distinguished; translational, polar and angulatcd units.
In this paper the focus lies on angulated scissor units, which - as opposed to
translational or polar scissor units - hold a substantial unrevealed potential for
innovative scissor grids suitable for architectural purposes. It is explained how these
angulated scissor grids can be formed starting from a continuous surface taking into
account the nccessary mathematical derivations. Allerwards the development of a
software tool based on this geometric design method is presented.
Although the supporting scissor structure is highlighted rather than the membrane,
the aim is to generate more interesting shapes for integrating a textile membrane.
This paper provides a first step in the design of new and innovative forms for
deployable lightweight membrane structures based on angulated scissor grids.

 

214

 

2             From a continuous surface to an angulated scissor structure

2.1         The aiigiiliittd stissor unit
BeCore going into depth in the nialhematical considerations to convert a surface into
a deployable scissor grid, some general aspects of the used element will first be
discussed.
An angulated scissor unit consists of two identical non-straiglit rods (with semi-
lengths a and h), connected by a revolntc hinge. The size of the kink is determined
by a kink angle p. As the deployment angle cj> alters, the unit deploys. The
imaginary straight lines connecting the upper with the lower end points oF the rods
are called tlie unit lines, Tor the angulated scissor unit, these lines embrace a
constant angle y dnring deployment (figure 2).
With the use of angulated units scissor strnetures can be formed which maintain
their overall geometry during a smooth radial deplo>nieni [4J,

2.2         Prineipi)] mesh of a surt':icL'
An angulated scissor nnit unfolds in a plane. To transform a surface 5 into a scissor
structnrc, the scissor units arc placed on a grid of i" with their base planes
perpendicular to .S". Hence a grid of planes perpendicnlar to i'is required to serve as a
geometric support strncture for the scissor structure (figure 3 centre). The key to
finding this grid lies within the principal curvature lines.
A principal curvature line (or line of curvature) is a curve on a surface whose
tangents are alwa>'s in the direction of principal curvature, 'fhrough each general

215

 

point of Ihe surface two principal curvature lines can be drawn which intersect at a
90 degree angle. In an umbilic point all tangent directions are principal directions,
meaning that an infinite amount of principal curvature lines intersect at this point.
'fheretbre, iimbilics cause singularities in a network of principal curvature lines [5].
By discrctising the network of principal curvature lines, a principal mesh of a
surface can be obtained.

fhe normal vectors ?! on the surface 5" through any 2 points of a principal curvature
line of 5are approximately coplanar. 'fherefore, any two adjacent node axes (i.e. the
lines normal to 5 at the vertices of the mesh) of a principal mesh are approximately
coplanar. It was shown in [6] that this deviation from planarity becomes negligible
once the cell sizes of the mesh become small compared to the curvature of 5.
Therefore, the principal mesh and the normals � at the vertices can be used to form a
grid of planes perpendicular to the base surface 5, necessary to place the scissor
structure on (figure 3).

For a surface 5" with a parametric form r = /(ii. ir) the principal curvature lines are
given by the following equation [7J:

where F, F and G are the first fundamental coefficients and e, f and s the second
fundamental coefficients. This second-order differential equation can be solved
numerically with an embedded fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration with adaptive
step [8]. However, for some surfaces exact solutions can be calculated [6].
2.3 Design of the scissor structure
Once the principal mesh is chosen, the basis for the scissor elements is fully defined
and the scissor elements can be designed. To ensure that the mechanism will

216

lunclion, the shape of the principal mesh on which the structure is based must stay
constant in shape during deployment, only its scale may change. Hence an extra
condition is required to prevent warping or skewing of the mesh. This condition
states that the adjacent semi-lengths of different scissor units should always be
equal:

As a result, the geometric line model of the total scissor structure forms a linkage of
similar rhombi {figure 4),
When designing the scissor structtirc, it is possible to replace each edge of the
principal mesh with one or more scissor units. In case of muhiple units linked
together in a plane, their outer unit lines will embrace a constant angle y,o, during
deployment. Therefore they deploy in the same manner as a single unit and together
form a multi-scissor unit (figure 4).

217

 

The (outer) unit lines of an angulated {niulti-)scissor iinit generally intersect and thus
form a triangle {figures 2 and 4), as do two adjacent node axes of a principal mesh
due to their planarily (figure 5). When placing a single or multi-scissor unit on each
edge of this mesh, the outer unit lines must coincide with the node axes of two
adjacent vertices. In its maxiniimi deployed slate, where the rods of the unit overlap
and fortn a single line, the ends of the unit should coincide with the mesh vertices.
It can easily be shown diat if each base triangle is replaced by only one scissor unit,
then a geometric restriction exists on the mesh;

This means that only meshes satisfying the equation above are suitable for serving
as a base mesh for a scissor structure where each edge is replaced by a single unit.
To eliminate this restriction, it is recommended to repiacc each mesh edge with a
multi-scissor unit. The more scissor units used per multi-scissor unit, the more
parameters will be iree for the designer to choose and the more compact the
resulting scissor structure will become. E.g., when using multi-scissor units
composed of 2 single scissor units, one parameter per vertex / remains free for the
designer to choose. This parameter can be a semi-length a, or /)/, a kink angle /?, or one of the a angles. Note that at least one of the chosen parameters defines a senii-
lengih to render the structure fiilly determined.

3          Applying the theorj' on other surfaces

In a following step, the developed theory of section 2 was applied on a range of
different surfaces, looking for surface classes which are fit for converting into a
scissor structure. Because the network of principal curvature lines is unique for any
surface except for a sphere and a plane, it might be unusable due to a large amount
of singularities in the network or large variations in cell size caused by the flow of
the principal curvature lines [5]. Large cell sizes tend to result in large variations in
the proportions of the scissor elements, which in theory will still function, but in
practice often results in structures displaying a very small deployment range. It is
important to realise that only continuous surfaces can be regarded, as discontinuity
in a surface leads to discontinuity in the surface normals, resulting in a mismatch in
the scissor structure.
First the ruled surfaces were regarded (e.g., a helicoid, a hypar, a mobius strip, etc.).
They required a case by case approach into finding the principal curvature lines on
the surface and afterwards to discretise this into a principal mesh which was
functionally and aesthetically qualified as a base mesh for a scissor structure.
In search for surface families allowing for the same generalised step by step
approach for each of its members, the surfaces of revolution came to tlie attention
{figure 6). A qualified principal mesh of a surface of revolution can easily be found
and all adjacent node axes for any principal mesh are exactly co-planar, as is
required for a scissor structure. It shows great potential for architectural applications
as individual scissor structures or as a linkage of several scissor structures, which is
possible due to the planarity of its principle curvature lines [6]. Because of these
interesting properties, the surfaces of revolution have shown to be ideal for the
creation of a conceptual design tool. Due to the generic design approach, a large
design freedom could be created within this software tool.

4          Digital Design Tool

Having found an interesting family of surfaces as a case study, the next step in this
research consisted of developing a conceptual design tool in a digital environment to
aid designers with the first steps of creating their own scissor structures. The tool
has    been    developed     in    Grasshopper®, a    generative      modelling   plug-in     for
Rhinoceros® which is a NURBS modelling sofUvare.
The tool is built up out of 4 major design steps, which will be explained using
screenshots from the Rhinoceros(R"> and Grasshopper® interface. These design steps
follow the theory explained above in a generic manner. The focus of this section is
the built up sequence of a scissor structure based on a surface of revolution and the
design parameters that the user can define/manipulate.
4.1         Step 1: Design of the surface and Ihe principal mesh
A surface of revolution is obtained by revolving a curve about an axis. In a first step,
the user inputs this curve, either by choosing between a number of well known

219

curvcs (e.g., a parabola resulting in a paraboloid, an ellipse to get an spheroid, etc.)
or by drawing an arbitrary planar curve in Rhinoceros® to use as an input. When the
axis of rotation and tlie angle domain of revolution are also defined, the surface is
created (ilgure 6).
Afterwards the network of prineipal eurvattire lines and the corresponding mesh is
formed based on the mathematical considerations of section 2. The user can define
the amount of cells and their proportions in both directions (figure 7Fehler!
Vcrweisquelle konntc nicht gefuiiden werdcn,),

4.2 Step 2: Optiniis�lion of tlie principal nicsh and its node axes
Since not all principal meshes are equally (it to serve as a base mesh for a scissor
structure, a second design step involves an optimisation process of the mesh. Ry
slightly altering the direction of the normal vectors at the vertices, the performance
of the linal scissor structure can he greatly improved. However, this paper will not
go into detail on this and refers to [6] for more information,
4.3 Step 3: Design of the scissor elements
Once the principal mesh is set, the scissor structtire can be designed. First, the user
chooses the amount of scissor units n;c,.v,vnr which will be placed at each mesh edge
(with n,>2 to prevent the geometric restriction on the mesh). Next, for each
vertex / of the mesh the corresponding semi-length a, is delincd, which will be
adopted by all scissor units joined together at that vertex. These semi-lengths are

 

220

 

calcLilalcd as a proportion, set by the user, of the lengths ol'the mesh edges joined at
the corresponding vertices.
If"n„.„,„r =2 the structure is now fully defined and will be generated (cfr. paragraph
2.3). In case inorc than two scissor units per mesh edge are chosen, other degrees of
freedom are calculated within the tool such that the remaining semi-lengths are
made equal and the kink angles are balanced out.
4.4       Step 4; Simiiliition of the mechanism
In this .step of the digital tool the deployment mechanism of the scissor structure is
simulated to give the user a visual idea of its kinematic behaviour (figure 8).

5          Considerations regarding the integration of membranes

In order for scissor structures to be able to fullil their flinction, they need to be fitted
with a weather protecting membrane. Ahhough the focus of this paper was not the
membrane but rather the supporting scissor structure, in the previous sections a
design method is proposed with the aim of generating more optimal shapes for
integrating a textile membrane.
The matter of fitting a membrane to a scissor structure is of high complexity and
needs to be researched fiirther. One can already define different methods of applying
the membrane: (i) first fully deploy and lock the scissor structure after which the
membrane is attached, or (ii) attach the membrane to the scissor structure such that it
deploys along with it (figure 1). In case of the second method, the membrane then
forms a loose bunch in fully folded state, making it vulnerable to influences of wind
and rain. At fully deployed state it can then be stressed by the scissor structure, thus
contributing to the overall stiffiiess of the structure. Taking the stresses in the
membrane and the interactions between membrane and scissor structure into account
increases the structural complexity of a deployabie scissor structure,
As an exatnple, figure 9 shows screenshots of a simplified structural calculation of
two cells of a scissor structure (figure 9 left). The calculation was performed in
Easy.Beam. In line with the z-axis, a strut has been added to lock the mechanistn.
The membrane has been pre-stressed and a symmetric snow load has been added.
The results show clearly how the membrane tries to close the scissor structure, of
which the elements are in cotnpression, and how the locking strut is highly tensioned
to pre\ent this from happening (figure 9 centre). Bending moments are the highest at the fixation points of the structure, as can be expected for any overhanging structure
(iignre ') right). Although such calculation models require large simplitlcations, they
allow to give a general overview of the ilow and scale offerees,

6           Conclusions

This paper presented the mathematical theory to translate a continuous surface into
an angulated scissor grid and how this theory was implemented into a practical
digital design tool. The method can be summarised in 2 main design steps:
Step I:   Discretise a network of principal curvature lines to form a principal mesh
which will serve as the base to build the scissor structure on.
Step 2:   Form a structure of similar rhombi on this mc.sh. Make sure that the outer
unit lines correspond to the node axes of the mesh and that the endpoints of
the rods are centred on it. Use at least 2 scissor units per edge to avoid a
geometrical restriction on (he principal mesh.
For certain families of surfaces, the theory can be applied in a generic manner.
allowing for easy integration into a digital environment. This kind of tools, of which
one is developed and presented in this paper, have the ability to easily generate and
compare a range of possible solutions, giving direct feedback to the user about
certain properties like the kinematic behaviour of the designed structure. This way,
they can be implemented to greatly increase the efficiency of the first stages of the
design process and to improve the overall performance of the final structure.
The attachment of a membrane to these structures still remains a complex matter for
which further research is required. Yet the proposed method creates more freedom in
the design, allowing for greater possibilities for the scissor geometry to answer to
the requirements of membrane structures. Thus, a first step is made towards
innovative  forms  for    deployable  lightweight   membrane  structures  based  on
angulated scissor grids.

 

 

222

 

References

[ 1 ]    ESCRIG, F., Expandable space structures. Space Structures Journal,
Vol. l,no. 2, 1985, pp.79-91.
[2]    GANTES, C.J., Deployahle Structures: Analysis and Design, WIT
Press, Southampton, 2001.
[3J    DE TEMMERM AN, N., Design and Analysis ofDeployahle Bar
Structuresfor Mobile Architectural Applications, Vrije Universiteit
Brussel, Brussels, 2007.
[4J    HOBERMAN, C., Reversibly expandable douhly-cui-ved tn/ss
structures. United States Patent, no. 4942700, 1990.

[5]    POTTiMANN, H., ASPERL, A., HOFER, M„ KILIAN, A.,
Architectural Geometiy (1st ed.), Bentley Institute Press, F,xton, 2007.
[6]    ROOVERS, K., Development ofa conceptual design toolfor
architectural surfaces based on angulated scissor components, Vrije
Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, 2012.

[7]    ZWILLINGER, D., CRC Standard Mathematical Tables and Formulae
(3lsi ed.). Chapman & Hall/CRC, Boca Raton, 2003.

[8J   ALLIEZ, P., COHEN-STEINER, D., DEVILLERS, O., LEVY, B.,
DESBRUN, M., Anisotropic polygonal remeshing. ACM Transactions
on Graphics, Vol. 22, no. 3, 2003, pp.485-493.



223

 

study for the assembly, mounting, and
raising process for a temporary, membrane-
based, folding structure

N.P. Toitcs'
' PhD Sliukni. Univeniiku! Folifecnicci dc Catalima

Abstract

This arlicic dest�ribes tlie sliidy and design and the design process Ibr the assembling
of a suitable enclosure of a foldable and transportable structure designed for mobile,
recreational and emergency spaces. This research proposes a roof based on a tensile
structure, which guarantees the lightweight folding structure, creating a design
perfectly articulated to the deployment process and the complete assembly of the
structure. The main goal is to provide a quick and easy assembly process on the
ground, avoiding the use of additional equipment such as cranes or lifting platforms;
during the structure deployment membrane is articulated to the six arches of tlie
main structure while they are folded and so the simultaneous deployment of the
structure and the enclosure is achieved,

The development of this article describes the design process of the roof from the
initial approach to the constructive formalization, emphasizing the importance of
proposing the system and the assembly method from the initial design.
The first results of this proposal, still under research, are shown. These results are
achieved through digital tools and the elaboration of scaled physical models that
allow understanding the behavior of the membrane during the lifting process and
defining  the   attachment  points   for   the   correct  assembly  and   the   structure
stabilization.

Ke}"�\ords: Folding striiclure, deployahle, .scissors, portable, mounting, membrane.

 

 

225


1 Precedents

Several applications of experimental and constructed proposals of membrane
constructions adapted to the structure in motion are known and have leaded to the
assembly process used. Leonardo Da Vinci is one of the first technicians planning
mechanisms for the development of Hying objects, using articulated bars, fabrics,
ropes and pulleys to simulate the folding movement of a bird's wing.
Another notable e.\aniple is the assembly of the circus tent, which is exclusively
made on the ground using a human team a motorized cable and spool mechanisms
providitig the force required to lift the tent. Some architectural examples related to
the approach of deployable .structure enclosures preceding this work are based on the
foldability and geometric principles to find the appropriate vertexes or edges
allowing proper operation of the movement and to ease the assembly of the
structure. Frei Otto proposes a variety of lightweight structures based on folding
membranes running through processes of collecting and rolling the fabric.
The Spanish architect Felix Escrig Pal lares, like can be see in his built proposals of
the roofs of the semi-Olvinpic pool of the City Council of Valencia de la
Concepcion (1999) and the Jaen Auditorium (1998) in Spain, uses a crane to pose
the articulated high steel arches, which move horizontally on a rail. The fabric is
pre-installed between the arches, and once erected the structure, a practical
dcploynneni process is achieved, which couples the structure and the enclosure while
covering temporarily a specific area.
Currently, known systems for membranes lifting ranges from manual systems, with specialized stalf that assembles the membranes supplemented with mechanical
systems based on spools, pulleys and cables that collect and display the membrane
according to specific requirement; to more complex automated systems used on the
cover of the Arena in Frankfurt where computer-managed devices control the
synchronized deployment of each of the membrane pieces.

2           Folding scene description

Hi The folding structure consists of a half-circle platform that deploys radially throughm)
  should exceed the length of the radius of the half circumference of the platform,each  
of si.\  girders  must  contemplate  additional  the  length  oi" the  arches  folded  to

a structural system of articulated bars (scissor system) and foldings that make up the
floorboards. Bvery two scissors articulate one of the principal axes of the stage floor;
these a.xcs are the supporting beams that hold dome-shaping arches, which at the
time of the opening of the eccentric scissors achieve the full deployinent process in
half circumference.
The staae has been designed in order that it occupies in the folded position 24m2
with a width of 4m meters viable to transport in appropriate streets. The area of the
platform corresponds to 36m2, the total area that occupies the structure of the
unfolded stage is of 132 M2, this owes to that the length of the girders ambles (8.80
support them.
Once deployed the lloor structure, opening similar to a fan, the deployment of the
six arches made of four double scissors and a support articulation at the base, with

226

load wheels which allow the tiispiacement of the lower scissor through a rail that
receives the folded arc and stands supported on the beam of the Hoor structure.
'I'he length of all the bars that compose the scissors of the folding arches is of 2.90m,
but it is the variability in the distances of the average joint between two bars that
shape a scissor, which generates the curvature in height of the structure of closing of
the stage, the total height that has the stage is 9,50m. Finally the arches arc stabilized
and secured through the central joint that receives the ends of the deployed arches
forming the stage dome.

The union or central knot, it is the piece that stabilizes the whole unfolded structure.
receives the top ends of six arches to across a mechanism based on the knots of the
scaffoldings, every arch finishes with an anchorage that is articulated to the central
piece, which is raised by one of the arches. When the arches are deployed the central
piece is in position            vertical and ready to receive and assure the adjustable
anchorages of every arch and conclude the deployed of structure.

The research presents a cover proposal to incorporate the design of the deployment
process of the stage; the membrane geometry, the patterns and the anchor points for
assembly, articulated to the deployment process of the structure,             creating a
homogeneous proposal that once fully deployed, remains armed and assembled to
the structure with the enclosure, only needing to add lighting or/and acoustic
elements according to the requirements of the architectural use. afterwards.

3           The membrane

It is defined as an area to cover the gap between structural arches and proposes a
standard membrane section that allows a fixing to specific points of the arches and
achieves to hoist simultaneously with the deployment process of the structural
arches.
Searchin}� the shape
■fhe geometric configuration of the membrane form comes from understanding the
deployed scene volume, which corresponds to a lialf hemisplierical dome, where six
axes, evenly radiated, define the location of the arches, so that the membrane section
corresponds to the spherical spindle delimited by two structural arches.
The definition of the shape is performed through WinTess3 soRware, which uses the
numerical inetliod to acquire the form. The digital model achieved basically presents
a triangular deformable mesh composed by bars forming equilateral triangles. The
decision of the mesh density in the sollware becomes important to relate the
precision, the esthetics and the ability of the computer to simulate effectively and
quickly the membrane form. In order to this, the perimeter of the membrane shape.
corresponding to an elongated trapezium, is defined and in its lower base unit ten
knots are established as a measure unit for the definition of the mesh density.
Trimming the perimeter chosen, the software performs the modification of the shape
by adjusting the design required by the stiflening of the perimeter wires and the
displacement of the knots to specific anchor points.
Structural behaI'iw
Several iterative processes have been developed under the software WinTess.!
characterizing the membrane materials and the forces that aficct it. In a first
calculation a Kerrari-Fluotop-T2-502-type membrane, with an elasticity modulus of
30 t/m (300 kN/m) and a prestressed of 1%, this corresponds to a pre-tension of
3kN/m; proposed. The leeches are stainless steel wires of 4 mm and an external
wind load of 90 km/h is applied. The results indicate that the structure us over-
dimensioned. therefore, from further simulations are performed with load belts of
33mm to bear the tension required and still the structure is over-dimensioned. The
definition of the leeches and the membrane edges inlluence in the proper anchor
type of the assembly system.
Patterns
According to the membrane shape established, is decided to perform the patterns
crosswise distributed uniformly between the lines marking the fixing points, e.g.,
Ibur pieces between each transverse line corresponding to the anchor points of the

228


iiieinbrane with the stnictural arches. The result is 16 patterns, made from the tools
offered by the software, which are based on the geodesic line drawhig and the
pattern triaiigtilation.

4          Systems and assembly method

Defined the shape of the membrane, its design is complemented by the development
of real scale models allowing the observation of the fabric's folding and the
definition of the connection details of the structural arches. To achieve the
simultaneous unfolding of the membrane with the arches, the central leech becomes
a zipper to divide the membrane longitudinally into tvvo equal parts, this is necessary
due to the fixing points of the canvas on top of the arches that correspond to the
shorter side of the trapezium, at the time of the deployment start when the arches arc
horizontal and fully folded. These points are radially separated and will be getting
close while the arches rise and join at the top; thus the two membrane sections' ends
joining at the top through the zipper to complete the fiill deployment of the stage,
Hie .scale model also confirms the proposal to inaintain the crosswise direction of
the pattern, thus cotild take advantage ol the link between patterns as horizontal
hinges for the proper folding of the fabric during the deployment process. Although
still under investigation, it is very important to choose the right material for the
membrane and the joining method between patterns allowing to tolerate the folding
movements without damaging or corroding the inaterial, the welding or the gluing.

Preview positioning
The transport of the fully folded construction is performed by the industrial wheels
located on each of the beams. Once in its final position, the horizontal deployment
process of the platform is done and it is secured to the ground with the integrated
trailer support legs systetn. The membrane may come pre-installed on the arches, but
it increases the width of the stage when folded, which would make its transport
much more diflicult and also could damage the fabric.
Anchor systems
A connection system between the tranvas and the arches is developed, which allows
easy assembling and disassembling and articulates the arches with the folding
movement. It consists of a platen stapled by rivets to the load belt, which runs along
the membrane. The platen located linearly just in anchor point, is designed with
eyelets where a suitable hook is inserted for withstanding far. The connection
system is completed when the hook is hinged to the ttiain structure through a
terminal eye which is screwed to the main rotation axis of the articulated bars
forming the slructtiral arc, Mechanical and human equipment
Onee secured the membrane hooks in specific terminals of the arches, while the
arches were folded, the vertical deployment process starts, through hydraulic lift,
Each arc is composed by four double scissors that form a grid which is used for
installing the hydraulic cylinder that exerts the force required to deploy. The grid
design also allows accessibility of a human team to ensure control and maintenance
of the stage,

230

The membrane, opened in its two sections, will be hoisted, but the closing process of
the zipper that joins the two sections is performed once the arches arc deployed and
sccured to the central joint. The closing process is achieved by the cable and reel
mechanism, which pulls the zipper tab and allow easing the travel of the cursor that
joins the two membrane sections, finally getting the designed form with the
appropriate tension.

Deployment process in scale model
During this investigation scale models to analyze closely the behavior of the
deployable structures and the behavior of the enclosure were built. From a 1:10 scale
model the principles of the tensile structure form and the construction details for the
membrane assembly were established.

 

231

 

Disassembly
The folding construction is designed as a temporary structure; in addition to design
the assembly system, must provide the disassembly process so that the structure can
be transported. For this specific case the process is reversible, across the same
hydraulic system, which raises the arches, in the top ends ol the arches they install
small pistons that arc articulated to the central union and from the base of the
structure, are controlled and activate in order thai they are disconnected of the
central knot. When the folding of the arches begins, the membrane will be opened
again in its two longitudinal sections and will fold down again to the starting
position. The force exerted by the folding arches allows the two sections of the
membrane to separate, but using a double lab in the cursor to pull the zipper in the
opposite direction eases the simultaneous folding process of the .structure and the
enclosure.

5          Conclusions

This research aims to show the structural and constructive feasibility of the assembly
process of an enclosure for a temporary stage by the application of deployable
structures, allowing it to be transportable, adaptable, flexible and practical at the
time of its assembly and disassembly.
The result is achieved through the exploration and production of various physical
models, which provide the l�est option according lo the spatial scheme established.
Each   physical and digital model, still         being studied, has generated valuable
contributions for the structure approach                                             clarifying the potential                                   construction

problems in the assembly process that could be generated.

 

The elaboration of a scale model, which simulates the deploying movement of the
stage, allows the assembly projection, delining the connections and the appropriate
lining method of the membrane, which results in the development of the research as
a feedback between the assembly and the design of membrane.
The assembly process goes beyond the simple placement of the membrane. Its study
and preliminary analysis of the elevation allows understanding the behavior of the
fabric, for e.xamplc, not forgetting that due to the characteristics of the deplo>TOent
of the structural arches, the membrane in its preparation should include a central
division, given by a zipper and must ensure in the implementation of the specific
details, such as hems and securing load belts, the control of the dimensions and the
exact tolcrancc.s to achieve the proper voltage at the lifling time,
Also, the design of the assembly system must coordinate the necessary team for
installation, the suitable weather conditions and have full control of the assembly
steps to ensure structural stability during the deployment process.
The useful   life of the stage is projected to       10 years and establishing an
assembly(niontage) of deployment per week, the stage was spreading out 500 times;
for an ideal functioning in the time of use the mechanisms for the joint of the bars
and subordination of the membrane, even in process of research, arc based on the
Spanish regulation UNE-EN 280:2002+A2;2010 for raising platforms, which there
contemplates self aligning spherical bearings, self-lubricating, anti-friction bearings
and lifetime lubricated bushings at all pivot points.
The assembly and the erection of the entire structure is projected to be done from the
ground. The accessibility for control and maintenance of the stage unfolds in the
articulated arches that serve as ladders reaching the top of the structure.
The subject of the automation allows projecting in the research the design of specific
software that controls the entire deployment of the stage and would greatly
contribute to the actual realization of the proposal, taking advantage of new wireless
technology trends   or    laser    systems    that    control     the    perfect     coupling and
synchronization of the structure deployment.
This architectural proposal based on the application of deployable structures
continues its investigative process, promoting the exploration of mobile enclosures,
researching materials, connections, geometries and construction      details more
suitable, able to facilitate assembly and withstand constant folding movement.

References

[ 11     FORSTER, B., MOLLAERT, M. {eds.), Arqiiilectiira Texfil. Gtiia
eurnpea de discno de lax eslnictiiras sitperficiales tensada., TensiNet,
Madrid, 2009.

[2]    SCHUMACHER, M., SCHAEFFER, O., VOGT M., Move. Architecture
in inotion-Dynamic components and elements. Basel, 2010.

[3]    FRANCO, R., TORRES, L., Esti'iictiiras Adaplahles. Universidad
Nacional de Colombia. Facultad de Artes. Bogota, 2006.

233


Responsive Textiles

Abstract

The goal of tliis research is to investigate kincmatical textile membrane strips
configurations that serve as responsive second building skins. The moveinent of
these adaptable material systems will be defined by a djnamic response to the
environment, balanced with the direct response to the user's influence on the fa9ade.

With use of the integration of sensors and actuators, as well as computation and
material responsiveness enhancers, the end result of the research should be a self-
actuating system that interacts with its surroundings and that is characterized by its
behavioral adaptability.

Thereibre the user does not control the technology, but represents a change in the
containing environment, and form is therefore not atnicted upon the material from
the outside, but it represents, together with its behavior over time, an emerging
phenomenon arising through the programming of a reactive environment,

The focus will fall on tensile architecture in motion, e.xploring basic responsive
capabilities to address local environmental conditions. The goal vvill be the abilities
of the system, and not its image, which represents a shift in perspective; formal
becomes behavioral and motion takes over image, as self-actuation means property
change and its entails the ability of the material to convert energy to motion. This
foreseeable scope will translate into a system that includes the inherent instability
given by the multitude of parameters able to transform the morphology of the form,
remaining open and indeterminate. The system will suffer a continual adaptation and
self-organization with a dynamic and changing context.

Key words: Responsiveness. AchpkihilHy. Dynamic response to em'ironment. Smart
texUles, parametric behavioral change. Interaction, Inform. Sensors + .Actuators,
Cognition, Reasoiiing

Inquiry:
Kow can architecture and detailing be thought of as the mediator of indeterminacy?
How can a learning process lake place with input from the system behavior and
output to the computation of impulses?
How can this be a continuous / iterative process that takes into account the ageing
and degradation of the material and system (attrition) ?
Mow can a system be developed that holds the possibility of creating loops and
feedback, patterns and beiiaviors in the way it moves, learn and rclearn?

 

236

 

I          Introduction

1,1. Research
While documenting the possibility of"adaptive reactive geometries, the formulation
of the assignment and the research expectations is possible:
As part of the research of adaptive multifunctional textile facade systems, how can
textile    envelopes   be     configured   as     responsive   user-interaction  oriented
arrangements? [low should the facade respond to user control, what should be the
balance between emergent behavior and direct response to user desires? What are
the parameters of the facade behavior?
Second skin envelopes are used more and more in recent projects, and commonly
serve singular purposes, such as shading. In more recent approaches, facades are
also thought of as responsive systems, that adapt to user requirements and that are
directly controlled, through sensors and actuators, by the users in order to achicve
specific states that respond to diverse needs. (Privacy, shading, rain protection, wind
protection) In most cases, these needs are determined after the designers analyze the
building context, the natural environment and the user expectations. This set of
requirements is fixed and known throughout the design process and is considered
not to change during the life span of the building. The only changing parameters are
the natural environmental ones, however this change is expected and the results in
the change ofllie facade are foreseeable.
Therefore the question has to be formulated: could a facade system be designed, that
responds to a set of predefined requirements but also has the ability to take in new
input and adapt to a changing context? Could such a facade respect the typical
boundary conditions     (          busy    urban areas                        and   their traffic               and         accessibility
consequences, big city user density, small built areas, versatility of space usage
requirements) and respond to the usual needs of a building (tire resistance, wind
resistance, shading necessity, visibility rules, etc,)?
As represented in Fig. 2, the inve.sligalion can start by primarily dividing the inquiry
into the following topics:
•      user movement and interaction
•      fa(;ade element eonllguration
•      behavior of the fafade in different weather conditions
•      effects on the building



237


1.2.Search space delimitation; Boundary conditions &Buildiiig tvpoloaics
What are the usual building typologies thai come into question for such projects?
Here a few diagrams that represent some common profiles of buildings in large
cities that might benefit from a multifunctional adaptive facade system:
1 .Retracted upper stories (f{)r the creation of a terrace)
2.Basic cross section
3.(Double) curved geometry
4. hitcrior Courtyard type
S.Rctracted lower stories (for the creation of a visible acccss area)

l,3.Reaiistic approach:
One exemplification of a project that uses one of these typical profiles is Soft House,
designed by Kennedy and Violich Architecure. The project strives to apply and
integrate a textile facade system to a residential building, with the goal ol"creating
shading that allows user interaction and control, while at the same time obeying
rules implied by visibility needs, fire resistance, wind resistance etc.
fhe kinematics currently proposed describe a twisting movement of the textile strips
(for which the material in the preliminary phase was intended to be glass fiber mesh
with silicone coating), which are approximately 60 cm wide and long enough to
shade two stories. These strips are linearly supported on the edge of the roof and are
continued with glass fiber reinforced plastics strips, connected to a rail on the further
edge of the roof This rail can be driven upward, resulting in an arched form ol' the

 

238


roof elements. The goal of this movement is tlie proper orientation to the sun
direction, as tliere are flexible glass cells installed on the composite elements, As forniulated by the Institute of Building Strtictures and Structural Design of the
University of Stuttgart, the assigned goal of this work is to investigate an approach
alternative to the current system and conventionally uses the Soft House project as a

239

 

Frame building scenario. The aspects borrowed from the Soft House project only
refer to the architecture of the building on which the facade is built.

1           Abstraction

As a generalization and development of the questions the Soft House project strives
to answer, the issue of an adaptable multifunctional textile envelope that should
serve as inore than a shading system is raised.
With the purpose of search spacc delimitation, this work will only investigate textile
facade systems with a strip-like configuration. The length of the elements must
suffice to apply to two stories and the connection to the roof and console must not
represent an impediment to the system kinematics, these self-imposed coordinates
arc to be seen as conventionally set limitations.

3           Investigation process

Seen analytically, such fa9ade strips might have the configuration seen in Fig. 7, that
was used as a guideline tor the model building phase. The sample configuration has
vertical, horizontal and diagonal elements with semi-rigid joints. For some of the
actuation options, some of these elements were not built, a total of 10 difTerent
configuration variations being used for the first model phase, as shown in Fig. 8.
The connections to the roof or handrail were not yet defined, as the goal of this
phase was to generally determine the actuation mode with the greatest kinematic
amplification.

 

Figure 1: Configurcilion guideline


240

 

3.1. Actuation possibilities:
As initiation of tlie investigation process, an option list is developed, that categorizes
the movement types possible: As a main diagram, a separation is made between
reactions, or efiects of the movement, and actuation, or cause of movement, this
being the basic structure by which system options could be differentiated.
Actuation can be external or internal: external actuation could be separated into
translation and rotation and internal actuation can be divided in contract, expand and
bend.

3.1.1 External actuation:
As a convention, external translation actuation is defmed as movement of either one
point, one linear element or possible combinations of these moving elements {such
as a point and a linear element, two points, two linear elements and so on). The
movement takes place in the initial plane of the element, prior to the movement.
•      Movement of one point
•      Movement of the horizontal fratne element
•      Movement of the side bar
•      Movement of two linear elements.
•      Combination of a point and linear element movement
External rotation actuation refers to the circular movement of one linear element or
several, outside of the initial element plane.
•      Rotation of the side bar
•      Rotation of the horizontal frame element
External actuation is applied on the outer frame of the textile strip,

3.1.2 Internal actuation:
Internal actuation is structured into contract, expand and bend.
Contract: The first type of internal actuation can be applied to either a diagonal line
in the configuration, a vertical or a horizontal one. The components do not have to
start or end on the external frame of the textile strip, and do not have to actually
consist of material elements; the movement refers to a line included in the
configuration. The actuation translates into diminishing the length of the specific
line, by bringing the two limit points closer together.
•      Horizontal line
•      Vertical line
•      Diagonal line
Expand: This second type of internal actuation is the inversion of the contraction
movement and can be applied to the same components: vertical, horizontal or
diagonal. The limit points are taken farther apart.
Bend:    The third internal actuation option is "bend", which refers to curving a
material element in the configuration, be it vertical, horizontal, or diagonal.

 

241


•      Horizontal element
•      Vertical element
•      Diagonal element
The investigation process will start with the analysis of examples of each actuation
possibility (model building, pictures, 3d models) and the classification of the effects
in the geometry.

3.2. Reaction options
Reactions can be either global or local, as follows: global translation, global rotation
or local contraction, local expansion, local bend.
After the development of the main analysis, the examples will be compared with the
secondary standards and further structured. An important aspect of this step is
checking the options against the            above         described                       boundary conditions  and
establishing their Illness in reference to these standards. The goal of this continued
classification is the expansion of the geometry option list.

3.3. Association options; physica] models, examples, 3d models

3.3.1. Physical models:
The investigated geometries dilTer from the point of view of the actuation tjpe (and
therefore also from the point of view of actuation effects on the outlook), but for the
sake of the extensive coverage of the search space, the differentiation will go on to a
more detailed level. For cach actuation mode possible, a series of 10 possible
structural configurations and for each of those 2 possible membrane layouts are built
and analyzed (the type of membrane used also differs from the point of view of its
elongation tolerance, some being built of plain weave glass fiber mesh, other of
clastic textile material). Each of the 16 built models is then actuated. The models are
built in scale 1:10, having a total length of approximately 60cm. The actuation is
schematically simulated by either introducing elastic elements that pull joints
together, or rigid ones that push farther apart.
The geometries are however only investigated for local actuation modes, as the
research is intended as an alternative to a global actuation concept. This work also
intends to show the diversity allowed by a system not through the diversity of the
actuator types or their complexity but through its intrinsic behavior (determined by
the interaction between membrane, outline structure, semi rigid elements, the
proportions of the stripes and the frame of the built environment on which the stripes
are attached).
The local actuation modes investigated are contract, bend and expand. The effects
contraction and bending have on the geometry otitlook are comparable; therefore the
more easily buildabie option is preferred, which would then be contraction. (A pull
and release system is more energy efficient than a bending or pushing one). The
expand motion, although possible conceptually is limitedly viable for the fore
defined  configurations, as      it            would           require an       extremely easily deformable
membrane (that allows an extended degree of elongation) and structural with low
rigidity. This possibility has however been tested on the configurations with pre-

242


stressed membrane and the conclusions are, predictably, that the amount of force
needed to deform the geometry in such a way makes this actuation mode undesirable
from the point of view of actuator complexity.
The investigation will therefore be focused on local actuation, and specifically on
the contraction option. The 16 built configurations are subjected to contraction of
horizontal elements, vertical ones and diagonal components. The first step is to
investigate the effect of single element deformations (each of the 3 afore mentioned
possibilities), in diflerent relative positions within the stripe. Combinations of 2
elements follow, either both elements actuated simultaneously or gradually. The last
step is combinations of 3 elements, with simultaneously applied deformations or
layered phased ones. The results are to be seen in the diagrams and pictures of the
models,
The goal is finding the options with the highest degree of kinematical amplification
but with the lowest degree of actuator complexity and diversity.
Therefore the diagonal contractions, applied in layered phases to configurations pre-
tensioned by the membrane are to be investigated flirthei*, first digitally and then with the
help ofmock-ups.                

3.3.2, Digital models: Digital represcntiition of deformed geometries
Results acquired witli the lielp of the pliysical models (scale 1; 10) are used to guide the
modeling of the digital simulations and to identity the parameters that influence the
relaxation. The stifhicss of the structural elements is one ofthe main factors responsible for
the end outlook. The membrane pre-stress factors as well as the way it is lixed to the
structure are equally important parameters.
Grasshopper: In order to simulate the GFK elements, their stiffness and their Ix-nding
behavior, a convention is made to represent them as trusses. The j�asshopper build is fed
with two curves, that is then transforms to polylines. Tlie number of control points (also
division points) is set with the help of two number sliders: one that represents the number
of transversal elements between the 2 curves and the other that represents the number of
division points between the transversal elements (the higher the number, the closer the
polyline follows the initial curve curvature). The trusses are then built, with as many frames
as total number of division points (transversal number * number of division in between).
Kangaroo: The Kangarcx) components set transforms the lines (nieinbers of the truss) into
springs, appoints them stiffiiess and damping values and uses the anchor points to fixate the
general geometry. Forces are either defined as vectors, such as gravity or as attraction stress
between two points on the different longitudinal elements. Diagonal elements are created
and enumerated, as to have the possibility to create the movement by detemiining the
numbers of the diagonals to be actuated.
In order to check the validity of the resulting defomied geoinetfies, they will also be built
by bending the elements that represent the GRFP longitudinal beams. Another way used to
confirm the validity of the geometries is building models in 1:10 scale and mock-ups 1:5.
Fig. 9 first exemplifies the configuration and applied actuation, then the digital results and
then the 1:5 Mock-up results. The strips are connected linearly both to the handrail and to
the roof edge. Tlie upper connection is to a rail that can be driven forward or backward, as
seen in Fig. 10. The semi-rigid GFRP elements that constitute the frames of the strips, as
well as the transversiil elements, both insure that the membrane get only slightly WTinkled
but not folded and also that the strips spring into the neutral shape after the actuation has stopped teing applied.

244

 

3.4 Coinpulatioiml investigatitin:
Adcr determining the parameters and limitations that define the geometry (given
either by the actual physical constrains of the system, or by the material specific
properties) and determining a set of general rules of response to a basic set of natural
environmental changes (sunlight, wind, rain) and the consequences of these rules on
the system, the computational process begins. This long list of parameters and
general geometrical rules allows for a multitude of associations, which translates in
a diverse set of system outlooks. A library made up of all possible deformed
geometries is created,
Instead of deciding on an image, and then controlling the appropriate parameters in
order to achieve that image, the system will only be given general impulses in
specific locations. These impulses will be given through data sent to the actuators by
either one "brain" or by several centres of computation.
The weather information is a critical part of the fafade development process. All the
geometries in the created library are evaluated for the current weather conditions,
These are fed into the algorithm as criteria after being extracted, with the help of
Grasshopper, Geco and Ecotect from a weather file.
Weather information, such as wind speed, wind direction, solar inadiation, humidity
levels and temperature are compared to predetermined values that represent average.
highs and lows for the place of construction of the facade and the specillc time of
year. According to their values and position in a predetermined order of importance,
�                         each weather criterion is assigned an importance factor or a weight.
Each geometry is then evaluated for each weather criterion (for some criteria the
evaluation function is an overly simplified version, to be used as a place holder), and
the separate grades are factored by the respective criterion's weight in order to get the final grade for each geometry, for the current weather conditions.
With reference to the wind analysis, a conventionally simplified version ot it is
simulated. Geometries are basically evaluated by the area of the surface normal to
die wind vector, the bigger this area, the higher the resistance to wind force.
lactoring in the main wind vector direction and the wind speed that determine the
importance that the results of this simplified analysis will have. The higher the wind
speed, the more essential the wind factor become (very high speeds mean storms)
and so the higher the weight of the results of the evaluation, this being the principle
used for the scaling of the weight of each factor (wind speed, wind direction, solar
irradiation, humidity levels and temperature),
Analysis of the temperature and humidity factors shows if there is snow, in which
case the geometries with the least horizontal surface (on which the snow would
gather) are evaluated the highest. This simplified perspective is developed in order
to allow the uninteiTupted development of the method, an actual snow and wind load
static evaluation to be written upon further study and with the help of specialist. In
case there is rain, the options with the largest horizontal surfaces (that would offer
shelter) are rated highest.
The result is a hierarchic list of all geometries, starting with the fittest one and
ending with the one that would behave worst in the cunent conditions. An initial

 

246

 

ado is created, one composed or.stripcs that Imd themselves actuated in the form
of the fittest geometry.
The user now has the opportunity to interact with ihe facade and select a desired
effect: hght/ shadow and size of the desired ciTect: local/ entire room/ multiple
rooms. This selection is then represented as a surface projection. If the desired effect
is light, then the geometry that leaves the least shadow on this surface projection is
searched and if the efVect is shadow, then the geometry that leaves the largest
shadow on the stirface is to be found. The connection with Ecotect is again created,
in order to calculate the shadows of all po.ssihlc deformed geometries in the current
weather conditions and their intersections with the effect surface projection.
The order in which the geometries arc investigated is the one resulted from the
evaluation to the weather conditions, therefore the end result is a facade made up of
stripes deformed to states that best behave in the current weather conditions and of
stripes that are as close as possible to that goal and at the same time respect the
user's choice of facade etTects.
Material behavior will also be periodically analyzed and sent as input data to the
computational brain.    Static analysis results could also be performed through
strategically placed sensors and be used as input information. The system therefore
interacts with an algorithm that learns the users' preferences, material behavior and
attrition and that continuously adapts and responds to changes and tipdates.

3.5. Computational brain: neur�il network

'fhe responsive facade interacts as shown above with the environment and the user
simultaneously, process that allows the gathering of data abotit the resulted
geometry outlooks. The weather situations are stored and averaged and the user
preferences are also remembered and developed into a neuron that allows the facade
system to foresee the desired effects in weather conditions met before. During a
certain time interval, for example one month of fa(;ade functionality, the algorithm
keeps gathering information and therefore completes itself� knowing what the user
has been desiring for the mentioned time interval. The initial fat�ade created hence
includes not only the fittest option in reference to the current weather eonditions, btit
also a suggestion that the algorithm makes after evaluating what the user had desired
in similar situations. This learning phase of the algorithm is permanent; the data base

that is used as statistical source keeps growing during tlie entire life span of the
facade.

247

 

4. Conclusions

This study focuses on the vast number of possibilities that a seemingly basic fat�ade
geometry oiTers if its transformation is specific to the employed materials. The
kinematic amplification is possible due to the successful collaboration of the
membrane material and the composites semi-rigid elements, conncctcd with semi¬
rigid joints.
The present work is to be seen as a conceptual method investigation, in which more
detailed functions are to be integrated. The method created represents a structured
frame that insures the easy implementation of specialists (electrical engineers,
construction engineers, etc.) written functions in the right positions. Therefore the
parts of the algorithm used to evaluate snow and wind loads as well as material
attrition are to be understood as place holders, overly simplilled variations that allow
the mediod to be understood as a whole. Further and more detailed investigations are
to be made upon the static characteristics and limitations of the structure, the goal of
the   present  work cornering kinematics                                                       being the discovery of the         intrinsic
transformation capabilities  of a   constructive ensemble  and   investigate  them
analytically.
'fhe algorithm and method created are innovative in terms of extending the
adaptability and flexibility of the user-facade interaction. One docs not overpower
the other; the surrounding environment is never compromised for the sake of user

248


control. All faclors with which the facade conies in contact influence il to
appropriate degrees and it permanently learns what the user encourages and what
facade outlooks are fittest in different scenarios.

References

[I]    Ileinich, Nadin, Digital Utopia, on dynamic architectures,     digital
sensuality and spaces oftomorrow, Akadeniie der Kunste, 2012, Berlin

[2J    Allen, Edward,      The responsive house. Strategies for evolutionaiy
environments� MIT Press, 1974

[3]    Coehlo, M, Maes.P., Responsive Materials in the Design of Adaptive
Objects and Spaces, 2007

[4J    Addington, Vl., Schodek, D., Smart materials and technologies for the
architecture    and    design      professions,    Amsterdam,    Elsevier      /
Architectural Press, 2005.

[5]    http://acdasresearch.com/features/vievv/computational-
design/project/smart-te.\tiles-as-an-architectural-material

[6J    Sterk, Tristan, Shape control in responsive architectural structures -
current reasons     challenges

[7]    Sterk,      Tristan.,      (2006)      Responsive    Architecture:    User-centred
Interactions fVithin the Hybridized Model of Control, in Proceedings Of
The    Game Set And Match II,     On    Computer Games,    Advanced
Geometries, and Digital rt�c7;nt)/og/e.v, Netherlands: Episode Publishers,
pp. 494-501.

[8J    Culshaw,    B.,    (1996)   Smart    Structures   And    Materials,       Boston
Massachusetts: Artcch House Inc, pp. 20.

[9]    htlp://www.willamette.edu/~goiT/classes/cs449/brain.html

[10] http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~nd/surprisc_96/journal/vol4/esl 1 /report.html#
Firing rules



249


Bendiiig incorporated: designing tension
structures by integrating bending-active
elements

Lars De Laet', Diederik Vcenendaal', Tom Van Mclc�, Marijke
Mollaert', Philippe Block�
' Lightweight Stnicliires Lab. Department ofArchitectural Engineering, Vrije
Universiteit Bnissel. Belgium
' BLOCK Research Group,\fnsiitute of Technology in Architecture, ETH Zurich.
Switzerland                           

Abstract

By integrating clastically bent, linear elements, a supporting system for membrane
structures is created that provides more freedom in design and can reduce the
required amount of external supports. To fully explore the potential and possibilities
of shaping tension structures by integrating these bending-active elements, the
authors developed an easy-to-use design tool for fast, robust and flexible modelling
and form finding. This paper presents the tool through a series of case studies that go
beyond previously presented applications.

Keywords: bending-active structure, tension structure, formfinding, design tool

1           Introduction

Doubly curved membrane structures are typically tensioned between high and low
anchor points, attached to the ground, buildings or poles. By integrating clastically
bent, linear elements in the membrane surface, an internal supporting and shape-
detlning system is created that provides more freedom in design and reduces the
required amount of external supports.
These elastically bent elements are often referred to as 'spline' or "bending-active"
elements. The latter term was introduced by Knippers el al. to describe "curved
beam or surface structures that base their geometry on the elastic deformation of
initially straight or planar elements" [1,2]. Combining bending-active elements with
a membrane structure creates a hybrid construction with interacting components.

251

 

The 'igloo' camping tent or llie umbrella arc probably the best-known examples of
this kind of structural system.
Currently, an integrated tool for form finding of bending-active tension structures in
which the interaction between tension and bending elements can be properly
modelled and calculated is not available. Therefore, the authors developed a design
tool with a fle.xiblc and easy-to-use graphical interface that allows the potential of
bending-active elements for shaping tension structures to be fully e.\plored.

2 Interactive form finding

The presented tool is written in P>thon [3] and implemented in Rhinocero.s [4],
providing a familiar and comprehensive user interface. Building upon the
framework for form finding of tension .structures using discrete networks, developed
by Veenendaal and Block [5], the equilibrium problem of the hybrid sy.stem, using a
mixed force density formulation, is solved vvith the dynamic relaxation. Results can
be easily visualised and inspected in the Rhinoceros 3D model space,
Using a mixed formulation, the force density of each element of the system is
controlled interactively by the user by assigning a force, length, force density, or
stiffness to the element, or any combination of these properties. Both the boundary
conditions and the form fmding parameters can be changed in between calculation
runs to interactively steer the design in the desired direction,
As an example. Figures 1 to 3 show diiTerent stages of a design exploration starling
from a simple arch-supported membrane (Figure I) similar to the one presented in
[6]. By releasing one end of the pinned arch and fixing the other {by defining a
starting angle), the bent element straightens and becomes a cantilever. Additionally,
half of the fixed boundary nodes of the net are released and the force densities of the
elements between those nodes increased to create boundary cables. Figures 2 and 3

illustrate the input and shape of equilibrium, respectively

 

252

 

In addUion to changing the node fixity and adding or deleting cable-nct elements,
various attributes of the structural components can he changed during form ilnding,
The user can, for example, docide lo make the boundary edges force-controlled,
define a set of links as cable and/or change the initial length or section properties of
the bending element. The latter is illustrated in the next example.
Three alternatives of the same structure in Figure 3, but with different properties of
the bending element are generated. Figure 4a is the reference figure, Figure 4b has a
bending element with a Young's modulus that is three times lower, and the bending
element of the structure in Figure 4c has a diameter twice as large. It is clear that this
form finding tool allows intuitive and fast exploration of the inlluence of different
properties on the equilibrium shapes of the hybrid structure.

An additional advantage and feature of the tool is the graphical representation of the
forces and bending moments, fhe axial forces in the cable-net links, cables and
bending elements are visualised (blue being compression and red tension), as well as
the three-dimensional bending moments along the bending elements, reaction forces
at the supports and any residual forces during calculation. This information allows the user to evaluate the generated shapes structurally, change some attributes if so
desired, and rerun, or continue, the form finding calculation.

253

 

3            Design examples
The potential of integrating bending-active elements in a membrane stmcture with
the design tool is demonstrated with the following two cases. The first is an
extension of the cantilevered construction illustrated in Figure 3, and consists of
multiple cantilevered bending elements {Figure 6). It clearly shows the supporting
and shape-defining function of the elements. The second example is a combination
of an elastically bent arch with a 'suspended' bending element (Figure 7).



254

 

4          Conclusions

Integrating bending-activc elements     in             tension      structures           is      a              powerful               and
interesting way to support and shape them. Various design configurations and
applications of these hybrid constructions are feasible. To allow full exploration of
the design possibilities, a form finding tool has been developed and subsequently
demonstrated in this paper through a series of case studies.
Future development of the tool will be focused on the use of different solving
strategies and the integration of a statical analysis module.

References

[1]    KNIPPERS, J., CREMERS, J., GABLER, M., LIENHARD, J.,
Conslrnction Manualfor Polymers + Membranes, Institut fur
internationale Architektur-Dokumentation, Miinchen: Edition Detail,
2011.

[2]    LIENHARD, J., ALPERMANN H., GENGNAGEL, C„ KNIPPERS, J.,
Active Bending, a Review on structures where bending is used as a self
formation process. Proceedings of the International lASS Symposium,
Seoul, Korea, 2012.

P\jthnn PtTkor:n-iim incj \ nncTiincrp — wwvv nvth�n nrtx

 

[5]    VEENDENDAAL. D., BLOCK, P., An oven'iew and comparison of
structuralform finding methodsfor general netwmks. International
Journal ofSolids and Structures, Vol. 49, no. 26, pp. 3741-3753.

[6]    ADRIAENSSENS, S., Feasibility Study of Medium Span Spliced Spline
Stressed Membranes. IntenialionalJournal ofSpace Structures, Vol.
23, no. 4, 2008, pp. 243-251.

 

256


 A -transformable tensile structure.

\
Valentina Beatini' and Koray Korkmaz'
' Depaiiment ofArchitecture, Izmir Institute of Technology� Turkey

Abstract

The aesthctical appeal and construction convenience of tensile structures favour
their spread use as transportable or temporary constmctions; instead the same
qualities have not been appreciated for transformable spaces. Transformable tensile
structures set special conditions, compatibilities, which can become overwhelming if
the surface is designed to carry loads, as in outdoor conditions.

Here a transformable tcnsioned point supported hypar is proposed. The frame is
doiible-foldablc from a planar configuration to the many and varied hypar shapes,
also alternating the highest and lower points. Integrated with a very un obtrusive
secondary mechanism, this architectural intriguing feature avoids the generation of
tears and excc.ssive .stress during the folding process or the installation of the
membrane. Especially, it allows governing the membranes discrete dimensions. The
paper describes the kinematic of the mechanism and the suitable membrane
developed through form finding processes,

Keywords: Saddle shape membrane, reconfigurahle tensile structures, Bennett
linkage, transformable hypar, hyperbolic paraboloid.

1           Introduction

Construction of tensile membrane is achieving a high development thanks to the
increasing capabilities of materials and computation software. A research topic
which is achieving increasing interest is the introduction of movement. Elastic
fabrics not subjected to high external pressure, like in indoor applications, can
change their shape, as shown in artistic installations. Also, a membrane can move
from a slack configuration to the tensioned areas thanks to bar mechanisms or
movable cables, as shown in linear or radial foldable tensile structures for outdoor
applications.

 

257


There are no developed studies on membranes that can move from different
tensioned states. Herein is studied such capability for a hypar system, a very typical
shape.
Before analysing the proprieties of the system, we would like to emphasise the
reasons behind the proposal. Firstly, from an architectural point of view, it allows
the generation of transformable elements. Its changing shape is a starting point into
the construction of new and intriguing spaces. Also as a simple form, like the hypar
herein proposed, the environmental capabilities increase; the membrane's shape and
behaviour can be better controlled under changeable weather conditions, like solar
shading. Moreover, the active control of shape, and so of response to loads, can set
for the membrane optimum working circumstances under rain, wind or snow.
Finally, the system maintain the possibility of completely close the membrane, like
umbrella or sliding structures do.

2          The transformable hypar

The geometry of the system is illustrated in Fig. 1: the membrane is point supported
lo a hypar frame, which has square sides and diagonal dimension of 15m. While the
frame can rotate 180° both around plane AOC and plane BOD, its working
conditions are supposed to be 90 < flr < 165 and 90 < < 165 .
Since hypars are quite common tensioned structures, the transformable frame is
firstly described, then with respect to this key feature the characteristics of the
membrane and the compatibilities of the two will be highlighted.

2.1        The rigid mechanism: the movement and its control.
With respect to Fig.I, the frame rotates from a planar configuration lo a hypar one,
with highest point being either A and C or 6 and D. The tri-dimensional folding of
mechanisms like this that use revolute pairs, which are the simplest joints, always
relies on the disposition of joints' axes not on the same plane not concurrent;       we
refer to [1] and [2] for for other designs of kinetic hypar structures made through

258

 

revolute pairs. Herein revolutes are aimed to achieve a complete and independent
control of rotation angles a and g respectively. As illustrated in Fig. 2, the designed
mechanism is actually the combination of a mechanism planar in xy plane, and two
symmetrical mechanisms which govern rotation around y axis

Each mechanism forms an independent circuit, which mobility can be computed
using the Freudetsein -Aiizade equation [3], which is specifically suitable to
consider the presence of more than one loop:

where;
is the mobility of the mechanism, i.e. the number of independent parameters that
are needed to uniquely define its position in space at any instant of time;
ft, i=l,j, is the degrees of Ireedom of each ./joint;
L is the number of independent circuits, each associated with Aj independent, scalar,
loop-closure equations. We get for planar mechanism Fig.2, left:
.\/=4-3=l
and for the ones on the right, which operating space is restrained to the rotation
around yaxis:
M=4-(l + l)=2
The disposition ofjoints gained by combination is illustrated in Fig.3, lefl, for half
the obtained system. We get:

 

259

 

 M = 6-4 = 2
/=l            (-1
By mirroring the mechanism (Fig.3, right), so that the prismatic joint P is in
common:
M = ll-(4 + 4) = 3

The diagram in Fig. 4 illustrates the fmal connectivity of links and joints. The three
siib mechanisms, whicli would need three inputs to govern their motion, are further
simplified using two spur gears for the joints connecting bars AE and AII\ the gears rolate one directly depending to the other, with opposite direction and same angle
and velocity. So, the reached mobility is now;

 

260

 

This way, a mechanism with two completely independent rotations is achieved,
where both motors can be located in A\ motor m2 controls rotation a while m!
governs the sliding joint which achieves rotation y,
2.2       The cieformabie teiisioned membrane: stable configuralions
Input pretensions of 2 Kn/ni for membrane and of 20 Kn for cables are imposed,
which are suitable for a type 11 membrane to be used in this kind of application and
range of dimension. Tensioned membranes tit the boundary conditions assessing
curvature and stress in mutual relationship. Here membrane would take difTeront
curvatures in cach stage, so the way it distributes internal has to be specially
counted. The first aim is to achieve a comparable behaviour in each phase,
While the surface resulting from stress and curvature distribution cannot be designed
a-priori, the hyperbolic paraboloid is a high symmetrical shape, very investigated,
and some considerations can be argued regarding the stable configurations.
During folding, the principal directions remain the same and orthogonal to each
other whatever are the rotating angles a or g: it is natural to choose an orthotropic
membrane. Moreover, it is straightforward to use a membrane with equal prestress
in the warp and wefl direction, so thai the behaviours of the membrane whatever is
the axis of folding are comparable, and so are the tension in the sagging and hogging
cables. This choice is nowadays feasible thanks to techniques which allow the same
elongation in warp and weft directions and it is actually recommended by some for
static application also. The pros hold ail the more in this case;      the ageing of the
membrane is equally affected and the fabric strength is used most cOlciently since
the fabric in both can be equally loaded


 

n
n

 

IH\
[m]

 

area
Imql

edge length
[nij

low
supports
load [Kii]

high
supports
load [Kii]

180

15.00

1.5,00

70.29

11.16

39.152

39.152

150

15.16

14.64

68,03

11,15

39.097

39.411

120

15.66

13.54

61,03

11,14

39,904

39.9'JI

90

16.56

11.56

48.83

11.11

38.442

40.443

Till =2 KiVm         Tc=20 Kn     b=90°

L= 10.66m

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

261

3           Geometrical compatibilities

3.1         Problem statement
The rigid bar structure and the deformable tensioned membrane should have
geometrical and mechanical compatibilities.
Considering different folding states of the trame, Table        1    shows the main
geometrical parameters resulted from equal form-finding processes performed to hit

a

7

y

7

7

180

ISO.OOO

180

[so.oon

180.000

150

150.341

149.99

I50.S70

150.375

120

122.677

122.68

122.618

122.671

90

98.755

97.42

97.136

t)7.437

Tm (Ka/rn)

0

2

2

3

Ic [Kn]

/

20

30

30

 

 

 

 

262

 

3,2          Length of ridge curve ntx
We focalize now on the ridge curves, mx and my, which are along the principal
direction of curvature. Moving apart points �4 and C, increasing the folding angle a,
the sagging curves has to cover a longer distance, so the membrane in direction y
tends to decrease its sag while grows its tension. The changed sag affect the hogging
cables also, which will increase their tension. Closing the frame more, the contrary
holds and the fabric slacks.
We observed that if, while folding in one direction (ex. by diminishing angle u), (he
frame is opened almost the same amount in the opposite direction (by decreasing
angle g), then membrane's tension along one principal direction can be restored, and
so its length. Table 2 shows the relationship between the two angles so that length of
ridge curve mx is constant, for different input values.
In particular, for the given frame and state of prestress, the angles' values had been
plotted and a quadratic regression had been calculated.
In ease of mcmbryne ten.sion and cable tension we have
/ = 0.075 ■       -1,506 ■« + 7,133       [n,d]
which gives an error: 0.009 with correlation coefficient I.
Given length of the bars and the relationship between the folding angles a and g, the
other geometrical parameters are derived. Referring to Fig. 5:

Substituting (3) in (I) and then (1) in (2)

In particular, we reach the dimension dywhich will be governed by motor m/.


263

 

dv' = slr--dy'
cc
dv = c/v'-siii| —
2
The desired value t/v —/.Ya, g), which mainLaiiis my constant is;
dy           - dx~  sin| —

Since iiali lhc system was considered, the motor m/ slides bars along the positive y
direction oTan amount

ady=

a

fldv

Adv

Ady

Adv

 

cm

Crtl

cm

cm

 

91.00

95.00

 

y 1 -50

150

77.00

S5.00

k:.oo

ft2.00

120

.SO.Of]

54.00

52,50

52,50

 

0.00

0.00

(),(](!

0.00

Tm |Kn.'m]

<]

2

2

3

Tt fkn.l

 

20

jO

10

 

 

 

 

 

3.3         Length of ridge curve //ly
The relationship between the folding angle a and the change in length of the ridge
line niy is a non-linear function, which has been plotted for the studied system
(Fig.6). If the membrane is designed for the minor length (which is the maximum
folded state, 0=90"), while the membrane folds, a rope should cover the length
excessive time by time. A cam is used, around which the rope is wrapped. While the
cam rotate, its profile is such that the point connecting the rope and the membrane
covers time by time the excessive length of ctirve my.
With the usual labels, two of such sub mechanisms are inserted in A and D, equal
and opposite to each other. We refer to \4] and [5] for the detailed design of the cam
profile, while the schematic design is showed in Fig. 7. The membrane is attached to
the frame by a rope, which passes throtigh a pulley and finally rotates around a
wrapping cam. The pulley is located on the centre of rotation of the system (point
A), and its circular shape allows the membrane to maintain a corrcct inclination. The
profile of the cam assures that the rope restrains of an increasing amount as the main
system folds more.

264

 

These subsystems work aeeordingly Ui the main system. Power can be transmitted
through a simple gear train: the first gear is eonnected to one of the revoiute joints
previously described, the latest to the earn, Sinee revoiute rotates around axis y and
the eam around axis x, then are used skew gears, whieh are helical gears especially
suited to transmit power between                                                                    axes of motion that are not parallel             not
intersecting.

We remember that the whole hypar will fold inaximum 90°, then each of (he
revoiute joints in A and D will rotate maxiiniim jr/4. Referring to Fig. 7, ifthe same
angle is covered by the cam, just a little part of its prollle would wrap the rope.
instead, if a wider profile of the cam            is involved, the overall dimension of the cam
is kept down. In the present schematic design, it should be advisable to achieve a
rotation angle of the latest gear J from 0° to 180°, which is four times the input
angle q4.
This result is achieved working on Ihc gears ratio, which is the proportion between
number of tooth ofconnoctod gears. In fact, since gears' teeth must match, when a
gear achieves a rotation angle q, involving n teeth, then from the connected gear the
same number of tooth will be involved. Nevertheless, the latest could not necessarily
cover the same angle, since the second gear could have a different circumference.
From the above considerations, the following relationship holds:

265

 

3.4       Edge length
A fabric hypar is point supported, as this is, if fabric stress is transmitted by
boundary cables to the support points. To achieve a continuous contact, the cables
are often inserted through welded pockets into the membrane. Consequently, edge
length of the fabric depends upon the given horizontal and vertical span between
supports, which is given by design, and upon cables' sag, that is related to cables'
pretension. If the same amount of pretension is imposed for all the phases, a stable
membrane would reduce a   little its edge    length     while folding (Table      1).
Nevertheless, cables would be subjected to tension major then necessary while
curvature increases, which diminishes their sag. If the length of cables is designed
based on the tension they actually are subjected in each stage, their pretension
should grow and sag decrease while the system is getting Hat.
A little adjustment in pretension is already an option thanks to corner connections
and details, an active re-tension and adjustment of cables' length could become
overwhelming.     We     propose to     longitudinally connect     the cables     and    the
corresponding bars through transversal springs. This approach is an investigation
hipothesis, which needs to be developed, nevertheless we note it is based on a
similar solutions found to maintain stress in Hat solar sails       uniform [6], and
generally it cops to limit the formation of creeps during folding or in almost flat
structures.
3.5       Surfacc
A form finding test changing pretension in cables has been performed. The results
are summarized in fable 4: in particular we note that diiferentiating pretension
allows achieving a comparable area in all the working stages, while an equal
pretension of cables would give very different fabric's surfaces.        We note that this
result has high approximation, since it is based on dilTerent cable's length and
pretension, while the proposed solution would involve the use of transversal springs.

266


a
n

edge
length
1ml

cable
sag
1ml

sag/span
I']

area
[mq]

miti
.supports
load [Knl

ma.\
supports
load [Knl

coblc+
rope
1ml

180

10.41

1.62

0.16

63.81

37.94

39.41

11.37

150

10.47

1.63

0.16

62.40

38.14

39,49

11,33

120

10.69

1.53

0.14

58.2!

38,76

39.79

11.24

90

11.11

1.41

0,13

49.21

39.59

40.24

11.11

 

 

 

 

a
n

edge
length
1ml

cable
sag
[ml

sag/span
1/]

area
[inq]

miri
supports
load [Knl

max
supports
load [Knl

cablc+
rope
[ml

180

10.44

1.36

0.13

62.43

36.88

38.21

11.37

!50

10.47

1.63

0.16

62.40

38.14

39.49

11.33

120

10.59

1.17

0.11

62.40

42.37

44.07

11.14

90

10.83

0.91

0.08

62.40

55.75

57.60

11.11

 

 

 

 

So far, we have hypars with the same principal direction; we investigated how to
control the curves' length along them and along the boundary as well; we finally
considered cable's pretension to achicvc a homogeneous dimension of fabric surface
in all the working phases.
Nevertheless, it is not enough to ensure that the same membrane would fit those
comparable areas. In particular, fabric behaviour is related to fabric proprieties:
material and threads. To avoid high deflections and stress, we assume to lie down
the thread directions rotated 45° to the frame. This way, the directions of maximum
curvature align with the threads and the membrane exhibit less deflection. So doing,
as pointed out in [7], the elastic modulus E and elongation are especially important
in almost flat systems, where deflection can be high, while folding the shear
modulus G and strains have to be taken into account. A deep structural analysis is
not here performed; nevertheless we can note that the use of springs is here
particularly interesting. In fact, due to the parabolic shape of the cables, springs
would have an increased length moving to the points of maximum sag of the cable,
so counterbalancing the higher deformation the membrane achieves in that area.

5          Conclusion

The present proceeding regards the combination of mechanisms with the tensioned
fabric so to achieve a tensile transformable hypar.
It sets a relationship between kinematic capabilities of a rigid frame and form -
finding processes of membrane. It has showed that an opportune design of the frame
as a mechanism allows controlling the main geometrical parameters of the fabric in
the various configurations. The elements added to achieve movements do not penalize the aesthetic qualities of the labric structure, and are based on common
construction possibilities.
While a limited number of tests has been performed, nevertheless their cncourajiing
results are a base for further investigation on transformability of tensile membranes.
A structural analysis .should be performed, so to test and .set the behaviour of the
various parts under loads. In particular, the threads strains and their relationship with
elongation have an important role, and it would be better if it couid be counted from
the initial phases of the design process.

References

11J    AKGUN, Y.,KORKMAZ, K.., SOBEK, W.,GANTES, C., A novel
spatial scissor-hinge structural mechanism for transformable roofs,
GEZGIN, E.;AKGUN, Y. (eds.), AZCJJhnini 2010 , proceedings of
AZCIflomm, Int. symp. of mechanism and machine science, Izmir,
2010, pp. 116-122.

[2]    KORKM AZ, K., AKGUN, Y., M ALLIEN, F., Design ofan 2-DOF HR
Linkage for Tninsformahle Hypar Structure. Mechanics Based Design
of Structures and Machines, 40, 2012 pp. 19-32

[3]     FREUDENSTEiN, F., ALIZADE, R., On the Degree of Freedom of
Mechanisms with Variable General Constraint. MAUNDER, L., (ed.),
Proceeding of4th IFToMM World Congress, Newcastle-upon-Tyne,
1975, pp.51 -56.

[4] TIDWELL. P.H., BANDUKWALA, N., DHANDE, S.G.,
REINHOLTZ, C.F., WEBB, G., Synthesis ofwrapping cants. Journal of
Mechanical Design, Transactions of (he ASME, Vol. I 16, n. 2, 1994, pp.
634-638

[5J KILIC, M., YAZICIOGLU, Y., K.URTULUS, D.F. Synthesis of a
torsional .spring mechanism with mechanically ad/ustahle .stiffness using
wrapping canis. Mechanism and Machine Tlieory, Vol. 57,2012, pp. 27-39.

[6]    IIIRAKU   SAKAMOTOA,    K.C.,     YASUYUKI     MIYAZAK.IB,       P.,
Evaluation of membrane structure designs using boundary web cables
for uniform tensioning. Acta Astronautica, Vol. 60, 2007, pp.846-857.

f 7 ]    B RIDG EN S, B., BIRC MA LL. M., Form andfunction: The significance
of material properties in the design of tensile fabric structures.
Engineering Structures, Vol. 44, November 2012, pp. 1-12.



268

 

 

PNEUMATIC STRUCTURES AND THE
STATE OF THE ART: learning from the
past, looking forward to the future



Pneumatic structures are potentially the lightest form of lightweight construction,
with an incredible efficiency in long span roof construction in particular. Despite
their wide range of applications in the built environment, the use of air-supported
structures for large enclosures has declined steadily over the last couple of decades.
This has been balanced to a degree by the rise in popularity of air-inflated structures,
and in particular ETFE cushions.
Materials   science   continues  to   provide  new    opportunities  for   lightweight
construction and the increase in computational power and development of new
analytical techniques should enable us to realise structures that couldn't have been
designed previously. Similarly, with the growth of large enclosures in world
architecture - fuelled by both economic and environmental necessities - there
should be increasing opportunities for large span pneumatic structures in the future.

Assimilation of the currcnt best design practise and applicable standards is the main
goal oi the TensiNet Pneumatic Structures Working Group, and the initial findings
of this group will be presented in the lecture. This will form the basis potentially of
a common understanding of both the potential and the limitations of pneumatic
structures design.

But what happened to the dreams of Buckminster Fuller of loofing over entire
cities?  And has the relevant technology progressed significantly in recent years?
Why were many of the early examples of large pneumatic enclosures not seen as a
success, and what can learn from these 'prototypes'? And how can pneumatic
structures contribute to the built environment in the future?

 

271

 

By examining the differcnl types of pneumatic structures - air-supported vs air-
indated vs hybrids - and through an investigation of the application of pncumatic
technologies in other industries, we will attempt to answer these questions and
explore the potential for resurgence in this form of construction,

Keywvrds: Pneumatic Slnictiires, air-supported, air-inflatecl, air beams, Tensairity

1           Overview of Pneumatic Structures

Pneumatic Structures broadly comprise structures that are air-supported or air-
iiitlated,  with others being a hybrid of both. The pressure can either be greater or
lower than the surrotmdings, although negative pressure structures are relatively
rare.
Air-supported structures are those that rely on the occupied enclosure within the
facility being pressurised so as to support the roof/facade and any loads imposed on
it.
An air-inflated structure is one in which the structural element itself forms the
pressurised vessel, with this providing the structural performance to resist the
gravity and environmental loads.
Hybrid purely pneumatic structures arc those in which the occupied space and
structural elements are independently pressurised.

2          TensiNct Pneumatic Structures Session & Working Group

■fhe TensiNet Pneumatic Structures Working Group covers all of the above, and
aims to collate best practice and assist in the promotion and development of this
technology where appropriate.         This session together with the associated Working
Group meeting is part of this process. The papers for the Pneumatics Session have
broadly been grouped into three categories:
1,     The Key Note session dealing with the key issues pertinent to the potential
future of Pneumatics
2.     Theoretical and E.xperimental Development of Pneumatics
3,     Applications of Pneumatics

3           Historical Development and Issues

Pneumatic Structures were used historically for non-structural applications such as
buoyancy systems, vehicular applications and pressure vessels. Although some
innovations started decades earlier, they become increasingly popular as structural
solutions in the 1960s as new t>'pes of long-span structures were required to enclose
new large building types,

 

 

272


The early pneumatic structures were largely Radomes as pioneered by Birdair and
Gciger amongst others, and found many practical applications as temporary facilities
in the aeronautics and astronautical fields. These air-supported enclosures were then
combined or siibsiiuiied for air-inflated beams to produce even more interesting
forms of enclosure. However, it was with the development of the large low-rise air-
supported roof in the 1970s that this form of construetion reached its peak.
The 1970 American Pavilion in Osaka represented a step change in the application
of air-SLipportcd structures. Its form and details were pioneering and represented an
incredibly efficient means of covering a large internal space. The oval roof
comprised an air-supported fabric membrane cladding that was restrained by a
diagrid of evenly spaced cables.

This was the spaee age, and new technologies and aesthetics were being embraced
throughout the construetion industry, and the growth of leisure pursuits post-war
meant that there was a whole new form of building awaiting a practical building
soUition: the large indoor sports arena. These facilities in North America and Japan
in particular were to represent a significant improveinent in the provision of
spectator and participant accommodation, with a covered roof allowing year-round
events, and comfortable unobstructed views for all,
The large low-rise air-supported roof apparently represented the most cost-effective
tneans of achieving the clear spans whieh were tjpically around 200m or more. This
fundamentally lightweight form of construction represented a minimal material

273

 

solution, with the cost of cables and fabric membrane being highly attractive in
comparison to steel or concrete with traditional cladding.          Less cranage and
temporary works were arguably required, with the high-tech aesthetic and state of
the art construction also of interest at this time.
Many were constructed over the next two decades as variants on the original Osaka
Pavilion, although tew matched its structural purity and efliciency. It appeared as
though Buckminster Fuller's dream of providing an enclosure over Manhattan might
actually be technologically feasible and indeed desirable until a series of issues and
events cast doubt on the reliability of air-supported structures in particular and
pneumatic structures in general.

any air-supporled roof structures began to develop problems under significant
environmental loading, with sometimes calastrophic��sno��cum� being the
main cause of failure.
Hiiih pressure �-inflated7syslems also had several failures, which were often
cxplDsively_d_angecpus. Similarly, it was also noted that where gun ownership was
profligate this also-ledJ:o many failures through deliberat e or accidental surface
penetration.
The requirements of enclosures also developed, from needing to he simple umbrellas
as was the case with the temporary military nneus for instance, with the need for
better environmental control performance eventually ruling out single or even
double, layerjjir supported roofs for most applications.

4          The Minnesota Metrodome

The most notable of the problems occurred at the Minnesota Metrodome, with
significant failures occurring 3 times in the 198Qs. To understand better why air-
supported structures fell out of favour and how-tjiev-mighlJje better employed in the
fijture, it is worthwhile understanding the issues associated with this particular
installation.

274

 

The enclosure was only lightly pressurised typically, with the ability to inrrrast� the
pressure temporarily to deal witliJii�her wind speeds. Tlie form on plan as buiit
deviated from the purer Osaka Pavilion with very uneven cable spacing and hence
much larger fabric spans at the edges. The form on elevation was also far more
blull, with the large edge portions in particular billovving_oul-UiideL.pressure to
create large exposed wind faces. Snow load - potentially the most onerous loading
for many north American roofs - was also to be resisted through a combination of
increased internal pressure and a complicated active snow melt svstem The latter
system relied on incidental losses from the un-insulated space below as the primary
means of melting the snow, together with a water-jet clearance system on the top
surface in extreme events.
A forensic assessment of the design and construction of the Metrodome by Ian
Liddell of Buro Happold in 1994 presented several recoinmenHaiinns Fnr tlip
application of air-supported structures:              ---                                    ~
•      An efficient and consistent spacing of supriortinii cables is essential for the
predictable behaviour ol the roof.
•      Appropriately close cable spacings are required tn miniinigfr mpmhrFini'
stresses under all environmental load�and reduce billowing - which in turn
will reduce the potential for stiow drill accumulation and substantial direct
wind pressures.

275

 

 •      l-liphoi- intmial. pressures are flesinihle In improve stability and resist
"applied wind and snow loads withotit the need for unreliablt; aclivc- snow
melt systems.
•      More reli.Thle ronlrol systems to ensiire pressure loss within the eiielosure
cannot occur through undesirable active venting.
•      In regions of high snow fail, consider a hybrid system of more highly-
pressurised pillows on a lightweight tensile primary structure that itself
could be.ain-suppurted.
Unfortunately. conHdcnee in air-supported structures for large arenas had been
fundamentally shattered, and their use rapidly declined.

5          Current Applications and the Pneumatics Sessions

That being said, there remains a steady industry for air-supported enclosures as
almost proprietary systems-JilL.ovcn_the_wodd, typicairj�s~femporary or scini-
permanent covers to enable priii£i£aiJx_QlildQDii_sporis-to4)e-played in all weathers.
Paul Romain's paper elsewhere in this session discusses the recent developments in
this industry,
Similarly, there has been an 'explosion' in the use of simple air-inflated systems with
HTFE-nillows being the most prevalent. Although BTFE applications are largely
covered in another session, we do include in the 'fheoretical/Experiniental parallel
session a paper on the state of the art regarding the analysis of these {and potentially
other closed cell structures) by Stroebel et al.             These ETFE pillow applications
typically appear to include many of the structural recommendations liom �
—tViiiwesota-rcpt�rt. although the ability to deal with snow accumulation in particular
appears to be rather hit and miss, with low internal pressures and potential ponding
under deflation sometimes an issue. ETFE pillows have also started to address the
non-structural issues associated with pneumatic structures - namely the need to
provide tempering to the internal environment - although as covered no doubt in the
other sessions, this issue is extremely complicated and not without its concerns.

Many other applications of air-inflated structures have used a different hybrid form
of construction, in which large non-KTFE cell'; nre snppnried oa a framed or similar
form of construction. In many ways these appear to be the most reliable applications

276

 

orBneuinaLic sirL|Ctiires, and Mike Sefton's paper in this session on the London 2012
Olympic Velodronie gives an insight into this form of construetion.

Traditional_air;beam design and conslriielion has continued to be developed, with
some curious air-frame strtictures often being more exotic than practical. However
the numerical assessment of these continues apace, with some recent research being
covered in a paper by Nguyen el al in the'I'heoretical/Experimental parallel session.
This session also inclttdes an interesting piece on the application ot reliability
analysis to pneumatic structures by Thomas et al. vvhich has parallels with the
reliability work on other tensile structures by Peter Gosling.
One of the most interesting developments in pneumatic structures has been the
Tensairity system, in which a low-medium pressure air beam provides restraint to
the principal load-carrying Hanges. Medium-span roofs can therefore be supported
in this manner, either as one-way spanning beams/arches or by barrel or shell forms
with discrete cells in an overall matri.x. Tensairity is discussed elsewhere in this
session by Luchsinger et al, who will present a fascinating update on the application
of this technology. Another paper on Tensairity by F�ockens et al - this time on some
of    the    recent    experimental   work    in    this    field     -     is    covered   in     the
Theoretical/Experimental parallel session later.

277

 

Deployable pncus have historically also been used for life-saving or humanitarian
applications, and potential developments for the latter are covered in a paper by
Maffei ct al in the separate applications session.
Also covered in the applications session are state-of the art high-altitude and
sculptural pneus (by Bown et al), a description of a recent pneu design with an
innovative inner liner (Lombardi et al), and the environmental performance of a
variety of air-supported roofs (Hua ct al).
The regulation of the internal environinent and the need to provide appropriate
acoustic or thermal attenuation is an issue that affects all of us working in tensile
architecture, and there have also been many reeent innovations in this field, from
multi-layer ETFE pillows, to bespoke insulated membrane products, and these could
well    be meaningful  in the future development and application of pneumatic
structures.
Other recent applications typically in one-off installations include hydrostatic
pressure  structures, and   medium-pressure 'mattress' construction. Also   under
consideration are more exotic forms such as framed buoyant systems and sculptural
elements that have borrowed much from the airship industry.

6          Future Applications & Recommendations

There arc many potential applications for pneumatic structures in the near future,
including:
•      Large indoor arenas
•      Temporary/seasonal structures
•      Lightweight cladding elements to roofs or facades
•      Sculptural elements in art or buildings Aerospace industry
The main considerations that the industry has to deal with for these are the
following:
•      Reliability & safety
•      Maintenance & lifespan

278

 

•      Form & aesthetics
•      Environmental pcrtbrmance
•      Cost & procurement
Hence to increase the appropriate use of pneumatic structures in              the buih
environment, we have to address all of tliese issues. The recommendations from the
Minnesota Metrodome investigations are also still highly relevant, and we can use
these together with the new technologies already in use to develop potential
guidance for designers:
•      Wherever practical ensure that the system is failsafe and almost certainly
doesn't rely on active control.
•      Consider slightly higher than nominal pressures for structural stability, but
steel clear of very high pressures.
•      If significant environmental control is required within the enclosure,
consider whether a tensile system is still the right answer.
•      If substantial snow loading is likely, then consider if an air-supported
system is appropriate.
•      Ensure the reliability of all active and mechanical systems with appropriate
redundancy and failsafe methods.
•      As for all spatial structures, the form is fundamental for air-supported roofs,
so ensure these comprise a low-rise profile and a regular cable spacing.
•      Consider using air-supported structures for only the largest building spans.
•      Consider   using   air-intlated  systems  for   medium   span   installations
primarily,
•      Consider    hybrid    forms    of     construction   -     such    as     combined
inflated/supported roofs, Tensairity, or non-pneumatic systems - to improve
the overall system performance and provide a new aesthetic.
•      Ensure that a risk-based assessment is carried out for all potential failure
and replacement scenarios.
•      And don't use pneumatics where gun use is likely.
Using the above, there are many potential opportunities for the adoption of
pneumatic structures in the built environment, including the following;
1.     Air-supported  structures  would   be    most   appropriate  in    regions   of
comparatively stable wind, and where snowfall is either low or non¬
existent. The Middle East is one such market, although sand accumulation,
thermal insulation and systems reliability would potentially be issues for
consideration.
2.     An air-supported roof could also potentially be manufactured from a
proprietary or bespoke insulated membrane sandwich system to provide an
outstanding holistic solution to an occupied space. Again, a large insulated

279


arena would be one such application, although the cost of the sandwich
system would be the tnost important factor to consider.
3.     In regions of" higher snow or wind loading, consider a hybrid system of air-
inflated cells supported on an air-supported primary structure. Such a
system was developed by Buro Happold for a 40 acre site in Northern
Alberta.
4.     Large open spaces with good security and excellent building control
systems also lend themselves to consideration for pneumatic structures,
either as air-supported or air-inflated systems. A good example of such a
facility would be a large airport building.
5.     Pneumatic air-inflated     systems as    cladding components are already
commonplace, albeit typically with ETFE, and their use in much larger
panels with other materials and potentially other layers of insulation etc
could provide interesting alternatives to traditional cladding. It is likely that
such a system would struggle to be cost effective in roofing-only
applications, but would be lar more attractive against most rival facade
systems.

7           Conclusions

Pneumatic structures have great potential to fulfil the needs of the built environment
if applied appropriately and imaginatively. Although there is much to do to improve
confidence in pneus for large enclosures, the industry has developed new-
technologies and capabilities in response to these and other drivers.
The above paper identifies these issues, and provides simple recommendations and
potential opportunities to designers and contractors alike. We have also provided an
overview of the main issues and recent developments of pneus and introduced the
other papers to be presented in this session so as to provide a context in which the
overall state-of-the-art for Pneumatic Structures can be assessed.

References

[1]    FORSTER, B., MOLLAERT, M. (eds.), European Design Guidefor
Tensile Surface Structures, TensiNet, Brussels, 2004.

[2]    HOUTMAN, R., WERKMAN, 11., Detailing ami Connections (Chapter
5). FORSTER, B., MOLLAERT, M. (eds.), European Design Guidefor
Tensile Surface Structures, TensiNet, Brussels, 2004, pp. 147-176.

[3]    LIDDELL, 1., Minnesota Metrodome. A study on the behaviour ofair-
supported roofs under environmental loads, Structural Engineering
Review Vol 6, No. 3-4, pp. 215-235, 1994.

 

 

280

 

Abstract

Air-supported structures conic in many forms and sizes. Their cconomy of materials
and large span capability is as relevant now as it was when Lanchester filed his first
patent in 1917. The long clear spans are particularly appropriate to sports enclosures
from stadia to swimming pool and tennis court covers. However, their very nature
lays them vulnerable to damage and collapse and even though good design can
mitigate this,   previous  failures and current  perceptions have   hindered  their
widespread adoption.

An opportunity arose in 2004 to rethink the airhail for a tennis club in Surrey, UK
where the Client wished to replace a damaged two-court demountable cover using
existing components. This project led to a subsequent commission the following
year, to replace an existing airhail at another tennis club in London. Here, a
complete   design   package   was   required  addressing  the   key   components  of
foundations, envelope, inllation controls and access and the formulation of a
'product' began to evolve. Despite its success, attempts to market the product - an
engineered mid-budget tennis dome - were thwarted by non-technical issues.
However, other related projects arose, including the replacement of a larger multi-
sport structure at a school in Wales.

The paper discusses the three air supported projects and identifies key engineering
and design features which were re-thought. Obstacles to the advancement of the
tennis airhail product are discussed, it is suggested that consideration of these may
be relevant to a wider range of air-supported structures and along with thoughtful,
robust design, instrumental in their next cycle of popularity.

Keywords: airhail, air-supported structure, tennis dome, product design

281

 

1            Introduction

Of the many types of air-supported structures, it is the inflated single skin, wide span
lyj:)e of enclosure to which this paper relates and which echoes the designs shown in
the 1917 patent of FW Lanchester [ 1 ].
Structural engineers often spend many hours developing a bespoke structure for a
specific set of design criteria. Wliilst they can be enthusiastic in wishing to
commercialise the final design, or an aspect thereof, this is often not possible. Yet in
2004 an unexpected opportunity arose to develop a product for an 'airhall'.
The evolution of a tennis dome product (known as 'Airplay') is presented through
the process of three linked projects which took place over a period of seven years.
Their success is considered in the concluding paragraphs.

2           Historical Background

The purity of form offered by air-supported structures was exemplified by the US
Pavilion at Expo' 70 in Osaka., combining a column-free clear span with minimal
material weight. These benelits had been equally appropriate to the development of
Radomes in the 1950's. The design principles were then commercially exploited in
small and medium sized enclosures for swimming pools, tennis courts and other
smaller sports venues.
Since their conception nearly a hundred years ago, the popularity of these smaller
'bubbles'  has bm'u.parLicular-ly—cyclic� having been   influenced by materials
development, fashion trends and failures, the latter usually as a result of poor
maintenance or extreme weather events.
It is intriguing that the Wikipedia entry for Lanchester [2] makes no mention of his
patents for air-supported structures, yet his description of the components and
observations on design are just as relevant today. He describes the key components
of an airhall as the enclosure membrane, the inflation blowers, the foundations and
the access. In a subsequent patent, Lanchester even indicates the desigrj_for an
enclosure for two tennis courts - foresight indeed.

3          Tennis Dome Design

The first two projects described in this paper are demountable, single skin PVC
polyester membranes restrained and reinforced b��a�net�of,iite_e.LcabieS-Qv.cr-the top
surface. The third project deviates from this approach, has no cables, incorporates a
second inner liner membrane and is a permanent ii�tallation.
The stability of the outer membrane is gained by an internal pressure of around
250Pa j;enerated by a blower unit. To resist higher winds or snow loading, this
pressure can be increased. Foundations resist the uplift forces around the perimeter
of the airhall, with access via air-locks using revolving doors or an airtight lobby.
For an enclosure of cylindrical section, a relatively straightforward calculation can
be made using the equation T=PR. The perimeter tension (T) will be at an angle and
not purely vertical; the pressure (P) will be a function of inflation and wind uplift

282


pressures; and the radius (R) will be a fijnction of the geometry (span and mid-span
rise).

The    Lawn    Tennis    Association (LTA) stipulates minimum clear zones 
around a  standard  tennis court within an airhall enclosure. As a result, typical 
geometry and thus stmctural requirements can be derived easily.   These zones 
are greater    than    for    a    traditional building  form and it is usually difficult    
to      satisfy    all       the dimensional    parameters    when covering existing courts.

For a double cotirt enclosure, the typical plan dimensions are approximately 36m x
36m, with a maximum height around 10m and with cables rimning parallel to the
length of die courts.
Key design guidance was taken from a number of references but particularly the
proceedings of the IStruclE conference of 1984 [3] and the state-of-the-art report by
the ASCE published in 1979 [4], Despite the age of these documents their content is
still relevant.

4          Project Background

The apparent simplicity of smaller airhall structures attracts opportunistic companies
offering low cost 'budget' demountable structures - attractive to those Clients with
minimal finance. Wliilst some budget products operate acceptably, others have not
lasted and lack the formal engineering basis of more expensive permanent structures
available from established suppliers.
Afler the failure of one such poorly executed dome at a small tennis club in Ash in
Surrey, UK, we were approached to pattern a replacement membrane. A good
relationship with the sub-contract fabricator existed and we shared an enthusiasm to
further involvement in this form of sports enclosure. We had also established contact
with the LTA who were instrumental in our involvement with the Coolhurst Tennis
Club in North London when they sought to replace their single court cover.
Coolhurst was a complete airhall package, including foundations, and spawned the
idea of a product which could be developed and marketed. Although the product
idea faced challenges, our fi-esh experience of air-supported structures led to another
project at a school in Haverfordwest, South Wales, whose multi-sports dome had
collapsed.
These three projects are described in more detail below,

 

 

283

 

5            Ash - Analysis and Membrane Detailing
The Ash Manor club is a small private club which also provides facilities to the
adjacent school. Two pairs of tennis courts are each covered with airhalls for the
winter season. The lower pair were covered successfully by a budget dome and
served as a useful benchmark for the re-covering of the two upper courts. Whilst the
Ash project started as a simple patterning request, there were no as-built records. It
was clear that a greater level of engineering input was required and so it was agreed
to replace the fabric and cables, but to re-use the existing two revolving door
assemblies, the ground anchors and the inflation fans.
5.1         Analysis
In order to prove the design of the enclosure components, some rudimenttiry
analysis was required. An assessment of the snow and wind loading was made to
British Standards and u.sed to set the target inllation pressures of 250Pa at steady
state and 600Pa to resist peak snow loading and .storm winds. The.se levels agreed
closely with those proposed in air-supported strtieture codes such as BS6661,
althotigh this had been withdrawn.
5.2         Inflation
The original enclosure interfaced with the tennis clubhouse via a poorly assembled
fabric link. There would have been significant leakage at this interface which would
have contributed to low inllation pressures and consequential loss ofairhall stability.
The low inflation could also be attributed to twin blower units which were in a poor
state, and ran off a single phase electricity supply. Whilst similar to those used on
the lower courts, we insisted that a new fan be used for the new enclosure.

Fan selection is probably the most complex component to specify. The key parameters are volu
pressures noted above. Overlaying the two curves gives the first step towards appropriate fan se

On this project, with a single phase elcctrical supply, even the largest available fans
would   have   struggled  to    meet   the   stipulated  criteria.  Consequently,  some
compromise on the target pressures was made but the eventual unit was still superior
to the old fans. These were incorporated within the design to augment the pressure
for the snow and storm conditions.

284

 

5.3          Fabric and Natural Lighting
Although a heavy grade PVC fabric can satisfy design requirements without the
need for cable reinforcement, these enclosures must be lit from the interior which
carries a risk of damage to the envelope if the dome deflates, or safety issues if Ihe
lighting units are suspended from the enclosure itself Lighting from outside the
enclosure using existing floodlighting is possible with a clear outer membrane and
simplifies installation, as well as making full use of natural light during the day.

5.4 Perimeter Detailing
fhe cables linked directly to the top of the existing ground anchors. These had been
installed at nominal centres of 1.2m (sides) and 1.5m (ends) but varied wildly.
Where anchor pairs were significantly out of alignment across the dome, steel
transfer angles were introduced. To avoid the usual slack areas in the rectangular
corners, the corners were truncated at 45 degrees in plan using a similar steel
member. Although only 1.5m long, this chamfer created a much improved form,
more uniformly stressed fabric and better access internally.
Traditionally, ihe bottom edge of the fabric would be damped down to a fixed
perimeter beam but this was outside the budget of this project. Hence, to minimise
movement of the fabric relative to the cables, reduce air leakage at ground level and
transfer the fabric tensions direct to the anchors, a webbing belt was placed around
the perimeter, attached to the skirt and retained with d-rings sharing the cable/anchor
connection. The bottom of the skirt tucked under the carpeted playing surface.
5.5 Patterning
Empirical patterning methods for airhalls tend to constrain the shape to a regular
form. To compensate for smaller plan dimensions additional height in the corner
zones is required if LTA guidelines are to be met. Formfinding techniques usually
employed on anticlastic tensile structures were adopted, manipulating membrane
stresses and cable dimensions to gain an extra one to two metres height. This
approach also enabled the generation of patterns for the two different ends to match
the asymmetry of the revolving door placement and the variable anchor spacing.
Fabric stretch compensations were introduced not only to allow for the clastic
stretch of the fabric, but also to allow for (he rise of the fabric between cables. The

285

dome was constructed as a separate middle and two ends for ease of handling in the
factory, with the union of the three pieces as the tlnal welding operation before
delivery to site as a single piece. Links to the doorways were tailored on site.

6           Coolhurst - The Complete Package

The Coolhurst Tennis and Squash Club was founded in 1903 and comprises 11
courts. Only one court at ihe West end of the site had a seasonal cover, albeit the
first tennis dome in the UK. originally built in 1964 for the princely sum of £4000.
The fabric had been replaced in the 1980's but with the inllation equipment also
nearing its end of life, the decision to replace the complete .structure was taken. A
club committee member, iMike Russum, acted as project manager. As an Architect,
he could see the advantage of employing professionals to tailor a bespoke enclosure.
Much of the enclosure design echoed that of the Ash airhall above ground using the
same materials and a new rationalised cable net arrangement. The key challenges
were the foundations and the inllation unit.
6.1         Foundations
The use of tension anchors came into question when the Coolhurst site investigation
uncovered a particularly complex set of conditions for such a simple enclosure;
1.     Courts had been newly tarmaced so minimal disturbance was required.
2.     A new concrete tree root barrier had been installed along the West
boundary which would inhibit placeinent of any foundations.
3.     To the South, a 0.9m diameter surface water main at 5m depth ran the full
length of the site, on the line of an old stream, restricting anchor placement.
4.     The site was old meadow lands, with the top 8m of soil being made ground
or alluvial deposits, requiring ground anchors to be at least 9m in depth, as
opposed to the anticipated 3m to 4m.
A study comparing the cost of a dead weight concrete ring beam to deep penetration
ground anchors concluded the latter to be cost competitive (around 50% at 2005
prices) although a hybrid concrete beam and anchor solution was still necessary
adjacent to the water main. The study also prompted the club to choose a two-court
enclosure which was better value.

 

286

 

6.2          Inflation and Controls
Building on the experience of fan selection from the Ash project, a bespoke inflation
unit was designed. It features manual controls to respond to high snow fail, and an
automatic stepped control linked to a wind anemometer to inerease inflation
pressure during sustained high winds. Using electronically controlled invertors, fan
speed is adjusted to produce inflation pressures between around 230Pa and 600Pa
from a single fan. Two 3-phase powered fans are cycled to ensure equal wear, and
the whole unit is mounted on wheels to allow it to be stored away from the eourts in
summer. The Club opted not to invest in a back-up power supply or heating.

6.3        Access
The airhall features a single access point located midway down the East edge.
Combining a revolving door and airtight lobby (for emergency stretcher use) into a
single unit, the bespoke design addressed the dillicult site constraints, it provided a
high level of detailing, reinforced glass viewing panels, and a smooth transition
between the differing floor levels. The link between the door and the dome was
specifically patterned (unlike Ash) to improve the appcarance and minimise leakage.

To meet minimum travel distances in the event of fire or collapse, two gas-zipped
emergency exits were also provided, integrated within the chamfered corner forms
of the main enclosure at either end of the West side.

287

 

1          Tasker Mihvarcl School - Patterning and Detailing

The Haverfordwest dome is larger than the two-court enclosures of Coolhiirst and
Ash, measuring approximately 38m x 55m covering two tennis courts and a multi-
surface area. Originally built in 2000, it incorporated a lining fabric, a raised
perimeter concrete wall and fully controlled inflation unit with back-up. The original
dome had been irreparably damaged when the back-up generator had failed and the
dome deflated onto an independent framed structure inside. The scope of the project
was to replace the double skin enclosure including the links to the perimeter
structure. The inflation unit and door frames were to be re-used. The new challenges
were the successful patterning of the links to the two storey entrance building, the
incorporation of suitable stretch compensations, and detailing the liner.
7.1         Patterning
The concrete perimeter wall and other adjacent structures meant that access to the
courts was limited. Consequently, (he outer membrane was welded in live separate
assemblies, each measuring approximately 44m x 12m, which could be manhandled
through the entrance doors, 'fhese were joined on site with a clamped connection.
The location of the joints was dictated by the fabrication constraints and the position
of the doorways, which could not be split across a joint.

Fabric stresses in cable reinforced airhalls are relatively low meaning that stretch
compensations are also minimal and tj'pically accounted for by the bulge of the

288

 

fabric between the cables. However, fabric stresses were much higher for the Tasker
Milward dome as the Type III fabric was carrying all the tension. Consequently,
more care was necessary to incorporate compensations as high as 3% within the
patterns and to allow for the necessary de-compensation down the site joints.
In addition to the four emergency exits located at the midpoint of each side, two
further links were patterned; one to the airtight store room, and one to the two-storey
entrance lobby and changing facilities. The latter measured approximately 8m across
and 4.5m high, attaching some way up the arch of the dome. At this height, the
potential sway of the dome is quite substantial and it was necessary to balance this
sway with the movement of the link fabric without compromising its own integrity.

7.2       Detailing
As on the previous airhalls, a chamfer to the comer was introduced to improve the
form and fabric assembly. The assembly was re-thought to improve the air-tightness
and integrate better with the re-used perimeter angle.
The attachment of the link forms was also an evolution of those used in Coolhurst,
and which were required to accommodate cables up to 22mm diameter in tightly
curved pockets. The Type I liner was simply suspended from the outer using cable
ties attached to welded plastic eyes, each of which had to be located and scheduled.
At the perimeter, the liner was attached to an eyelet strip incorporated within the
clamped edge detail of the outer membrane.

8           Conclusions

The programme and cost constraints on a typical building project often preclude the
furthering of designs originating with that project. In contrast, a series of related
projects, with essentially similar goals, does provide the opportunity to evolve those
designs and a 'product' can result. This was the case for the airhall design of the
Airplay tennis dome where the knowledge and experience from successive projects
was built upon. It is also clear however, that as with all products, the evolution is
organic and that improvements can always be made.
Applying engineering rigour to develop a mid-range product fitted well within the
marketplace and the aspirations of the LTA to fiind affordable, demountable
facilities. Key aspects of all the airhall components were re-appraised but the
success of a product relies on other factors beyond its functionality and design.

289


On Lhe siippiy-side, the team needs to have a long term commitment. Without this,
valuable effort can be wasted llnding alternative partners or ultimately, production
can stall as it did with the Airplay dome.       Costs need to be compatible with the
intended purpose and competing products; budget domes offer a very minimal
specification to keep costs low but do not per se attract grant funding for Clubs from
the LTA, whilst the fully specified permanent domes with heating, lighting and
back-up generators require larger Clubs who have the ability to match-fund LTA
grants. This directly relates to the customer-side consideration of potential market
size; a bigger marketplace will encourage the supply team commitment and loyalty
and provide greater product exposure. A higher volume of sales will also enable
further investment in the development of the product.
As individual projects, each of the above airhalls satisfied its own brief and was a
success in its own right. As a product, the Airplay responded well to its target brief
of an engineered, mid-range, demountable tennis dome. However, this focus limited
its potential market size and is considered another reason its progress stalled.
Each building project will remain influenced by its environment and the aspirations
of the Client. In this context, it may be more appropriate to refer to the Airplay
tennis dome as a 'bespoke product' - ready to be customised to suit. Certainly if the
rigour of good design and engineering helps to improve the lower end of the market,
confidence will grow in this form of air-supported structure and help it compete with
other solutions as a means of providing long span enclosures,

References

 

 [1]    LANCHESTER. F. W.. /j/? Imwoved Constmction of Tent for Field___
Hospitals. Depots and like purno.jes. GB Patent 1 19339A, 1917__�
[2] WrKfPEDlA, Frederick W, Lanchester
http://cn.wikipcdia.org/wiki/Frederick_W,_Lanchester , Jan 2013

[3]    HAPPOLD, E. et al. The Design ofAir-Supported Stnictures,
Conference proceeds., Bristol, Institution of Structural Engineers, 1984

[/ [4]    BOWER, E.J,_et-�AirrSuppprted Structures, ASCE ReQort. 1979.
Image credits (all images copyright): FW Lanehester,y;g i. LTA (Manipulated),fig
2. Paul Romain /fg.y 3-] 1. J&J Carter/tg 12. Pembs CC Jig 13.
Project credits
Ash Manor (2004): Client: Tennis Together; Project Management: Dragon Covers
& Domes; Structural Design/Patterns, Ingenu; Fabrication/Installation: AJ Tensile.
Cooihurst (2005): Client: Coo!hurst Tennis & Squash Club; Project Management:
M. Russum; Design & Patterning, Ingenu Ltd; Fabrication/Installation: AJ Tensile.
Tasker Milward (2010): Client: Tasker Milward School; Project Management,
Fabrication & Installation: J&J Carter; Structural Design & Patterning, Ingenu Ltd.

 

290

 

Abstract

The load bearing capacity and the weight of a structure is the result of the applied
materials and the applied structural concept. A high live load to dead load ratio is the
result of a smart combination of materials and stnicture. In the Tensairity concept,
compressed air, fabrics, cables and struts are combined. This light-weight structure
has been successfully apphed to roofs and bridges. In these applications, different
ways to couple the compression and tension element have been applied. Here, we
investigate the influence of this coupling on both the stifThess and the ultimate load
experimentally and with FEM. A major result is that the live load to dead load ratio
can be increased by a factor two with improved coupling of the compression and
tension element. In a new projcct Tensairity girders are investigated as the load
bearing structure of a high performance wing dedicated to harvest wind energy at
higher altitudes. With the proposed design a live load to dead load ratio of more than
270 is predicted using standard kite materials.

Keywords: Inflatable structure, Tensairity, Experimental tests. Finite Element
Analysis, Wing structure.




Introduction


The structural concept Tensairity is a synergetic combination of pneumatic fabric
structures with conventional structural elements such as cables and struts [1]. The
major focus of the Center for Synergetic Structures at Empa is to investigate the load
bearing behavior of Tensairity and to develop new applications for this lightweight
structure. In the last years several shapes of Tensairity structures have been studied
like plates and arches [2] but most of the efforts have been concentrated on straight

291

 

girders. In particular spindle shaped Tcnsairily girders have been investigated
experinienlally, analytically and numerically with asymmetric [3J as well               as
symmetric construction [4].
The studies have revealed the influence of the air pressure on the stiffness of the
structure. For the symmetric girder, results have also highlighted the subtle interplay
between the stitTchords and the soil inflated hull leading to a peculiar deformation
of the system. The weak coupling between the tension and the compression chords
has been emphasized. In this paper the influence of an improved coupling between
the two struts is                        investigated    experimentally and numerically for the same
symmetric spindle-shaped Tensairity girder.             The original girder is thereafter
referenced as the o-spindle. Two modified Tensairity girders are studied that have
the same chord geometry as the o-spindle but have in addition an improved coupling
of the chords. The reinforcement of the c-spindle is a continuous fabric web while
for the d-spindle it is discrete and given by a number of cables. These three designs
have already been applied for the construction of roofs or bridges (Figure 1).

In a second part the design of a Tensairity beam for a high performance kite is
presented.  First    investigations on the potential of Tcnsairily for  kites have
highlighted many advantages like the aerod>iiamic and structural performance, the
low weight and the small storage volume [5], In a new project, kites are developed
at the Center for S>'nergetic Structures for harvesting wind energy at higher altitude.
With the use of very light and .strong materials the Tensairity technology can reveal
its full potential in this application.

2           Design of symmetrical spindle shaped Tensairity girders

The geometrical characteristics of the three Tensairity girders are shown in Figure 2.
They are identical in the front view, with a span of 5 m and a ma.ximal distance
between the chords of 0.5 m at mid-span corresponding to a sicnderness of 10. The
parabolic chords are made of aluminum with a total cross section of 40 x 15 mm*.
The end pieces connecting the upper and lower chords are made of steel. It is
important that the support of the girder is located exactly at the theoretical
intersection point of the lower and upper chord. The hulls including the web were
fabricated using a PVC coated polyester fabric material (VALMEX 7318). Great
care was taken that the fabric hull cannot move relative to the chords. To this end, a
kcder was welded to the hull as shown in the Detail B of Figure 2. The two halves of

he chord are firmly clamped to the keder with a screw every 15 cm along the chord.
The force which pre-stresses the web of the c-spindle is given by the hoop stress and
depends on the air pressure, the radius of the htill segment and on the angle between
the hull and the web. This angle was varied along the span of the c-spindle in order
to obtain an equal pre-stress of the web. The pre-slress of the cables in the d-spindle
depends on the geometry of the hull and the air pressure. The same hull geometry
has been used for the c-spindle and d-spindle. Having a constant distance between
the cables, the same pretension in all cables can be obtained. In total 23 stainless
steel wire ropes with 5 mm diameter each are used in the d-spindle.

The total mass of the o-, c- and d-spindle is equal to 28,3 kg, 31.8 kg and 36.6 kg,
respectively. They all share the same chords, end pieccs and connectors that
represent most of the system mass with 22.2 kg. As far as the hull is concerned, it
weighs 6,1 kg for the o-spindle and about 8 kg for the reinforced girders. The o-
spindle is the lightest structure while the fabric web of the c-spindle increases the
mass by about 12 %. The heaviest girder is the d-spindle. While the mass of all the
cables is about the same as the mass of the web, two bladders needed to obtain an
airtight structure as well as spacers and other small metallic parts needed for
positioning the cables increase the total mass of the d-spindle by 4,8 kg compared to
the c-spindle.

3           Testing and finite element analysis of the Tensairity girders

A dedicated test rig was set up to test the load bearing behavior of the Tensairity
girders (Figure 3). Two electromcchanieal drives with a maximal force of 20 kN
each activate a whippletree system which distributes the load into 32 evenly spaced
points. The simply supported girder is laterally supported in order to prevent out of
plane movements utider loading. The applied load is measured with load cells
connecting the actuators with the whippletree system. Tests are displacement
controlled. Three load cycles arc applied. Deformation data of the girder arc taken
froin the last cycle. The deformation of the girder is measured with a 3D digital

293


image correlation system {Limess Vic 3D). To this end, several markers were placed
along the chords of the test specimen to determine the deformation of the lower and
upper chord along the span (Figure 4). A theoretical accuracy of about 0.1 mm (1/30
of a pixel) can be obtained with this sy.stem in this setting. Depending on the light
conditions and the calibration a minimal accuracy of about 0.5 mm was obtained in
practice.

m

Hull

SHELLiai

Mombrano onty

m

Chords

SHELL181

 

a

Erxj parts

soLioias

 

m

Membrano wob

SHELLtei

MembrarkO onty

 

Cablos

LINKIO

Tension ant/

 

 

 

The Tensairity girders were modeled and analyzed with the finite element method
using ANSYS. The steel end parts and the aluminum chords are modeled by 3D
bricks and 2D shells, respectively. The membrane for the hull and the web are
modeled with 2D shell elements without bending stiffness. The cables are modeled
by ID spar elements that have no bending stiffness and can only act under tension.
The meshes are presented in Figure 4. The material properties of the coated fabric
were obtained from in-house test procedures [6][7]. In addition a pressure-dependent
shear modulus was used as significant variations can be observed in inflatable
structures [8].

4          Comparison between the Tensairity girders

The measured and simulated displacement distributions along the span for the three
girders for the compression member and the tension member are given in Figure 6.
A distributed load of total 5000 N is applied. Obviously, the o-spindle deflects much
more than the c- and d-spindle. The displacement of the compression element adopts
an m-shape [4] with a maximal deflection at about 1.5 m from mid-span. This
behavior must be attributed to the arched shape of the compression element as it was
not found in the deflection behavior of an asymmetric o-spindle Tensairity girder
with a straight compression element [3]. Interestingly, the tension chord moves
against the direction of the applied load. This again can be attributed to the arched
shape of the compression chord. As the rise of the compression member becomes
smaller under the homogeneous loading, the ends connected with the tension
member are pushed slightly outwards. This spreading of the system tends to
straighten out the curved tension member leading to the observed displacement
against the direction of the applied load. The overall behavior with a different
displacement for the compression member and tension member indicates that the
coupling between the chords is rather weak for the o-spindle.

 

295

 

I'he deflection of the compression member of the c-spindle also shows a slight m-
shape. However, the difference between the displacement at mid-span and the
maximal displacement is small and close to the accuracy of the optical system. With
a dellection of about 3 mm the c-spindle is much stiffer than the o-spindle. Both the
compression element and the tension element move in a very similar way in the
direction of the applied load with a slightly larger displacement at the compression
side where the load is being introduced. This proves that there is a much tighter
coupling between the chords in the c-spindle than in the o-spind!e due to the fabric
web. In the case of the d-spindle, the maximal deflection is found at mid-span both
for the compression and the tension member which have an almost identical
displacement distribution. Again, as in the case for the c-spindle, a good coupling of
the compression and tension member is obtained by the connecting cables. The
deflection is about the same as for the c-spindle. Overall, it must be emphasized that
the correlation between the experimental results and the FEA predictions is very
good.
The experimental load-displacemont behavior of all three girders is shown in Figure
7 for two different pressures. Due to the particular deformation distribution of the o-
spindle the average displacement of the compression element over the entire span is
shown on the x-axis in order to have a meaningfijl comparison. As already hinted in
Figure 6, the c- and d-spindle perform much better than the o-spindle both in tenns
of stiffness and ultimate load. At 25 kPa for example the ultimate load is about a
factor of two higher compared to the o-spindle, while the stiffness increases by
about a factor of three due to the stronger coupling of the chords. Comparing the d-
spindle with the c-spindle, both the stiflriess and the ultimate load are a bit higher for
the d-spindle. Due to the higher mass of the d-spindle, the ratio of live load to dead
load is about the same for the c-spindle and the d-spindle and in the order of 60 for
the given pressure of 25 kl'a. This ratio almost reaches 100 for a pressure of 50 kPa
in some further tests. This is a dramatic improvement regarding the minute
modifications introduced in these girders in comparison to the original o-spindle
which reaches a live load to dead load ratio of only 54 for the same pressure.

 

296


The Figure 7 also emphasizes the influenee of the air pressure in (he hull. As the
pressure increases the ultimate load increases for all three girders. For the o-spindle
it has been shown that this influence is not linear and levels off at higher pressures
[4]. For the c- and d-spindle however, the ultimate load is almost proportional to the
pressure. For those girders, the ultimate load is rcached when the fabric web or the
cables lose their pre-tension, which is indeed proportional to the pressure. Another
interesting result is that the stiffness of the c- and d-spindle remains almost constant
while the stiffness of the o-spindie signillcantly increases with the pressure.
Actually, as long as the fabric web or the cables are under tension they act similarly
to the web of a flanged beam whose flanges would be the chords. Therefore the
stifFiiess of such girders can be roughly estimated using an equivalent I-beam model.
These results will be discussed in more detail in an upcoming paper.
The three girders have also been tested under asymmetric load as well as under local
load applied at mid-span. Under asymmetric load a sinusoidal displacement
distribution of the two members is observed with almost no deflection at mid-span.
Under local load the deflection has a maximum at mid-span and two negative
minima at about % and y4 of the span. For the o-spindle at 25 kPa the maximal load
is equal to 4 kN under asymmetric loading and to 1.5 kN under local loading [4].
These loads correspond to about 40% and 15% of the maximal homogeneous
distributed load, respectively. For the c- and d-spindle similar investigations are in
progress. First results show that the reinforced spindles are also stitTer and stronger
under non-homogeneous loading.
Based on the comparison between the three girders under homogeneous distributed
loading and preliminary results under non-homogeneous loadings, it appears that the
c- and d-spindles are the most suitable Tensairity designs for roof or bridge
structures as they allow for optimizing the live load to dead load ratio. The simpler
design of the o-spindle makes it still very attractive for temporary applications.

 

 

297



5 Lightweight wing structures for airborne wind energy



In order to satisfy the increasing demand for electric power as well as the CO2
emission reduction targets there is a growing need for sustainable energy production.
Among the various renewable technologies wind has seen a dramatic development
over the last twenty years. One major limitation of the wind turbines is however
their tower height which strongly limits their potential. Generally, the wind speed
increases with increasing altitude above ground. As the power density of the wind is
proportional to the cube of the wind speed, harvesting higher altitude wind could
significantly increase the energy production of the wind power systems. Today's
largest capacity wind turbines (>7 MW) have a hub height of about 130 m and reach
a maximum height of about 200 m. In order to reach higher altitude, wind airborne
wind energy concepts have been developed in the past decade [9]. One of these
concepts is to use a kite or a tethered wing connected to a winch on the ground.
Electrical energy is produced by transforming the linear aerodynamic lift force of
the flying kite into a rotational motion of the winch. A closed-loop process is
achieved by flying so called pumping cycles [10]. In the power phase, the kite flies
crosswind generating high loads. The tether pulls on the drum which starts to rotate.
The kite rises and the generator connected to the drum produces electrical power.
Having reached a threshold altitude, the kite is flown out of the wind and the
retraction phase starts. The kite is reeled in to a lower threshold altitude from where
the power phase starts again.
For this application the weight of the kite is a crucial topic to&n